Women of the Klan: Racism and Gender in the 1920s

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University of California Press, 2009 - 228 Seiten
Ignorant. Brutal. Male. One of these stereotypes of the Ku Klux Klan offers a misleading picture. In Women of the Klan, sociologist Kathleen M. Blee dismantles the popular notion that politically involved women are always inspired by pacifism, equality, and justice. In her new preface, Blee reflects on how recent scholarship on gender and right-wing extremism suggests new ways to understand women's place in the 1920s Klan's crusade for white and Christian supremacy.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - ScoutJ - LibraryThing

Has that train-wreck quality of fascinating while horrifying. More of a political historical overview than an outright chronicle of activity, though. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Women of the Klan: racism and gender in the 1920s

Nutzerbericht  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Blee, a sociology professor, has written a fascinating and disturbing book about the women of the Ku Klux Klan (WKKK) in the 1920s. In Part 1, she examines the historical, cultural, and symbolic ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Organizing 100 American Women
11
Womanhood and the Klan Fraternity
42
Battling the Seductive Allurements
70
Joining the Ladies Organization
101
Epilogue
175
Notes
181
A Postscript on Sources
219
101
225
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2009)

Kathleen M. Blee is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh.

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