Toward Managed Peace: The National Security Interests of the United States, 1759 to the Present

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Yale University Press, 1995 - 416 Seiten
With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, can the security of the United States be protected by reducing its involvement in international affairs? In this authoritative book, one of the world's leading political analysts and policy makers offers an emphatic and Wilsonian No. Basing his argument on a lively review of the diplomatic experience of the United States and of the prospects for world politics, Eugene V. Rostow contends that the most vital security interest of the nation is in the effective functioning of the state system as a system of peace. To achieve this goal, the state system must be based on a favorable balance of power, and it must be managed by the major powers, or a decisive number of them, in accordance with the United Nations Charter.

Rostow shows that except for the disastrous interlude between the two world wars, the United States has always played an active role in world affairs, first as a target state under the protection of Great Britain, and later as a leading participant. The lesson of America's international experience, Rostow finds, is that the moral goal of American foreign policy is the achievement and maintenance of peace, not a universal crusade for democracy and human rights. The United States, he says, is an indispensable leader in that effort.

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Inhalt

Introduction
3
Concept of Peace
29
The Quest for Peace from the Congress of Vienna
40
Introduction
53
The Vienna System Reborn April 1917
191
The Precarious Birth of
208
Pretense and SelfDeception
234
Hitlers Icarian Flight 19291939
252
PART HI The Age of Truman and Acheson 1945 to the Present
277
The Stalin
283
A Case Study
309
The Gorbachev Era and Beyond
337
United States Foreign Policy after the Soviet Collapse
362
Index
385
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