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The two acids just referred to are similar in composition to sulphurous and sulphuric acids. Berzelius was not successful in his attempts to procure hypo-telluric acid, nor in those to obtain a lower degree of oxidation than tellurous acid.-Ann. de Chim. et de Phys.

Oxygen in Air contained in Snow.-M. Boussingault found in snow water, collected in his descent from Chimborazo, but 16 per cent. of oxygen.-Ibid.

Flint and Chalcedony not Simple Minerals.- Professor Fuchs, of Munich, finds that opal, which is amorphous silica, dissolves in caustic potash even when in mass, and that in powder it is rapidly taken up. Powdered opal unites with lime in the moist way, and the mass hardens under water.-Ibid.

Flint is a mixture of quartz and opal, and the latter may be separated from fragments of flint by potash. Chalcedony contains more of it than flint.-Jameson's Journal. Temperature of the Earth, as shown by that of the Waters of Artesian Wells. -M. Arago states as the result of observations not published, that the temperature of the water from these wells increases with the depth of the source, at the rate of one degree Fah, for every thirty-seven to fifty-four feet.-Jameson's Journal.

Quantity of Rain at Different Elevations. The register of the rain fallen at Kinfauns Castle, for the year ending in December, 1834, gives 23.10 inches by a rain gauge in the garden, 20 feet above the level of the sea, 23.25 by a gauge in the Castle tower, 180 feet above the same level. The greater quantity at the upper level,

Mechanics' Register.

Berlin Iron Ornaments.Some of these are so fine, consisting of rosettes, medallions, &c., that nearly ten thousand go to the pound. In the coarse fabrics the value of the material is increased by manufacturing eleven hundred times, and in the finer nearly ten thousand times.Arcana of Science, 1835.

Mortality in Europe. It appears from tables of mortality in the principal states of Europe that there dies annually 1 inhabitant out of 28 in the Roman States, and the ancient Venetian provinces; 1 in 30 in Italy in general, Greece and Turkey; 1 in 39 in Netherlands, France and Prussia; 1 in 40 in Switzerland, the Austrian Empire, Portugal and Spain; 1 in 44 in Russia in Europe and Poland; 1 in 45 in Germany, Denmark, and Sweden; 1 in 48 in Norway; 1 in 53 in Ireland; 1 in 58 in England, and 1 in 59 in Scotland and Iceland.

The Quadrant.-In 1734 it was said, “as soon as the common prejudice against new things is worn off, and the instrument is well known, I do not believe any ship will go on a long voyage without one of these excellent quadrants."

A French Mechanic.-M. Cavi was brought up a joiner. After serving in the army (what Frenchman is not a soldier?) be returned to Paris with a capital of 50 cents. He worked with a pattern maker during the day and in the evening took lessons in drawing; and as much of the night as could be spared from sleep worked upon the plans commenced in the drawing school. In 1823, be undertook the manufacture, in a small way, of steam engines, and in eigbt years had become possessed of stock in trade to the amount of one thousand dollars. After losing two-fifths of this by the failure of an individval connected in the way of business with him, he succeeded in recovering himself so far that in ten years he bad manufactured 123 steam engines, the total nominal power being 2,835 horses. He has made recently an iron steamboat, navigating the lakes Neuchatel, Thorum, &c. His present establishment enables him to furnish a steam engine of 160 borse power in a month-Baron Dupin.

Curious fact in relation to the Hedge-Hog.-It is stated on the authority of M. Lenž and Prof. Buckland, that the most virulent animal poisons have no effect on the bedge-hog, and further on the authority of a German phy. sician that prussic acid, arsenic, opium, and corrosive sublimate were given to an animal of the species, without injurious effect. --Arcana of Science, 1835.

List of American Patents which issued in January, 1836.

January

6 6 6 6 6 6 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 15 15

15

1. Water-proof silk hats.- George B. Dexter, Boston, Mass.
2. Belt saw for timber.— Benjamin Barker, Ellsworth, Maine,
3. Saw for felling trees.-Walter Hunt, New York,
4. Cleaning clover seed.—James Manning, Lambertsville, New Jersey,
5. Washing machine.--Joab H. Hubbard, Bloomfield, Conn.
6. Cutting wooden screws.-Joseph Peavy, Levant, Maine,
7. Dying hats.-Aaron Gould, Washington, Conn.
8. Lock for doors.--Solomon Andrews, Perth Amboy, N. J.
9. Cutting grain, &c., mill for.-William Gerrish, Portsmouth, N. H.
10. Wharves, piers, &c. - John G. Pray, Brooklyn, N. Y.
11. Napping machine.—Stephen Marsh, Jericho, Vermont,
12. Drills for metal, &c.—William R. Jones, Granville, N. Y.
13. Hanging wagons, &c.—Henry Mellish, Walpole, N. H.
14. Planting corn.-Charles R. Belt, Washingion city,
15. Plough.-- John Dalkaner, Canton, Obio,
16. Bedsteads.Jonas Maguire, Philadelphia,
17. Hydraulic cement.-Levi Kidder, New York,
18. Wells, &c., covers of.—Levi Kidder, New York,
19. Packing tobacco.-J. B. Allen, Richmond, Va.
20. Ropes, &c., making.-- John Whiteman, Philadelphia,
21. Trunks, valises, &c. - James W. Noble, Pittsfield, Mass.
22. Plough.-Samuel Witherow, Gettysburg, Pa.
23. Slove, air-tight.-Isaac Orr, Washington city,
24. Baker, reflecting.-L. B. Olmsted, Binghampton, N. Y.
25. Grooves in corset rings, &c.-Charles Buckland, Middletown, Conn.
26. Thrashing machine. -Ebenezer Brown, Chenango, New York,
27. Horse power.-Samuel Newton, Dayton, Ohio,
28. Propelling boats.-Philander Noble, Westfield, Mass.
29. Plough.-J. P. Chandler, and P. Ranger, Milton, Maine,
30. Saddles and collars.-Ebenezer Hale, New York,
31. Hulling corn.-Warren Carpenter, New Castle, Pa.
32. Force pump.-Benjamin Egbert, Lansing, N. Y.
33. Stove-pipes.-Ezra Ripley, Albany, New York,
34. Sulkey seat.-0. H. Capron, and G. Barton, Jr., Shaftsbury, Vermont,
35. Packing flour.–J. F. Barrett, Granville, N. Y.
36. Wooden bridges.-Stephen H. Long, Topographical Engineer, U. S.
37. Hoes.-Adna Allen, Ramapo, New York,
38. Trap for rats, &c.—Thomas Neill, Herkersville, Ohio,
39. Hydraulic cement.-- John White, Syracuse, N. Y.
40. Horse collar.—John Hopkinson, Warren county, Ohio,

15 15 15 15

15

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194 265 158

55 124 308

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284 N. 140° V. 102°

225 320 212 104

67 253

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CELESTIAL PHENOMENA, FOR MAY, 1836.

Calculated by S. C. Walker.

subtract 15.1 from time of end.
Im. a Sagittarii,
21 *Im. sun by moon,

26 N. App. centres,
32 33 Em. sun by moon,

[m. a Cancri,
* For irradiation, 5", and 12.1s. to time of beginning.

Im. A Ophinchi,
Em.
Em.

Em.
47
47

57
Day. H'r. Min.Sec.

8 9 21 11

12 † " 20 20 30 30

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Meteorological Observations for January, 1836.
Tberm.
Barometer. Wind.

Water State of the weather, and
Moon. Days. Sun 2 Sun 2P.M.

Remarks.
rise. P.M. rise.

Direction. Force.

rain. Inches Inches

Inches. 170 36°

29.90
29.90 W. Moderate

Clear day.
28 47
.93 30.00 SW Calm.

Clear day.
35 35
30.15 .20 E.

Drizzle-cloudy.
32 37
.20 .05

E.

Moderate. Rainy day.
37 36
29 86 29.90 NE.

Drizzle.
31 31
30.13 30.24 E.

Drizzle-cloudy.
7 26 32
.14 .00 NE. Brisk.

Cloudy-light snow.
8
33 33
29.66 29.60 E. Blustering 2.20

Rain.
9 32 32 .50 .50 NE

Snow, 2 feet, drifted.
27 30
.34 .34 W.

Snow-cloudy.
11 29
32
.54 .56 W. Moderate.

Snow-clear.
12 30
35
.70 .75 W.

Clear day.
13 32
40 .86 .94 W.

Clear-cloudy.
14 33 49
.96] 30.00 W.

Clear day.
32
30,05
.05 W.

Clear day.
23
.20 NW. do.

Clear-lightly cloudy.
27
29.90 29.76

Snow-sleet.
32
.50

W.
do.

Sleet-cloudy.
29
.95 .95 W.

Clear-lightly cloudy.
25
30.10 30 15 W.

Clear day.
2110
34 .20 .15 SE

Cloudy-lightly cloudy.
22 36

40 29 70 29.70 W.

Rain-lightly cloudy. 23 16

21 30.00 30.10

NW. do.

Clear day.
24 9 26
.40 .45 NW.

Partially cloudy-sleet, with snow
25 25 30 29 53 29.60 NW. Blustering. Snow-clear.
D 26 17 31
.90 SW. Moderate.

Cloudy, lightly cloudy.
7 20
.96 .96

W.
do.

Clear day.
28 1 11 30.000 30.03

W. do.

Clear day 29 3 23

.00 .03

Clear day. 301 17 32 29.90] 29.90 WSW.

Lightly cloudy.
31/ 34 32 .60 .54 SSW

Snow.
Mean 22.68|31.39 29.90 29.90

do. do.

fallen in

do.

do.

do.

do.

do.

do.

do.

do.

do.

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do.

do.

do.

do.

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Barometer.

30.45 on 24th,

29.34 on 10th. In consequence of an accident which happened to the rain gauge, no es

1. on 8th.

Thermometer. Maximum height during the month, 49. on 14th. timate could be made of the quantity fallen since the 8th of January.

29.90 do.

do. Minimum Mean

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