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QOMPILED WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE TRUSTEES OF

WASHINGTON'S HEAD-QUARTERS,

BY MAJOR EDWARD C. BOYNTON.

NEWBURGH, N. Y.:
E. M. RUTTENBER & SON,
64 Second Street.

HARVARD UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY

INTRODUCTION.

THE General Orders of Washington during the :1 War for Independence have never been published in full; and in consequence of the dispersion and destruction of the original copies, no hope is entertained of their ever being presented in one unbroken, continued series, from the first to the last.

Many of the Orders herein have not been placed in type until now. The two Newburgh letters, “To the Officers of the Army," have been furnished from original copies, and are absolutely correct. The Roll of Officers of the Continental Army is taken from original MSS., as is also the letter in regard to the Great Chain. This collection includes all the Newburgh Orders of Washington known to exist, and it is probable that few, if any, are missing.

The sketches of individuals and incidents of a local character are chiefly compiled from the “American Historical Record, through the courtesy of Dr. Benson J. Lossing and Messrs. John E. Potter & Co., Publishers, Philadelphia, and are appended as interesting centennial subjects. An especial acknowledgment is due to Mr. Joseph Van Cleft, of Newburgh, for the cut of the old Head-quarters.

NEWBURGH, N. Y., May 1, 1883.

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WASHINGTON'S HEAD-QUARTERS

AT NEWBURGH, N. Y.

F all the buildings used by General Washington

as head-quarters during the Revolutionary War, none is so interesting as “ The Hasbrouck House” at Newburgh on the Hudson.

Its locality, in the south-west portion of the city, is not at present, with its surroundings of manufactories and irferior dwellings, suggestive of its former dignified position somewhat apart from the town, and standing on a rise of ground which commanded a prospect in every direction; but there is still the wide 'outlook from it up and down the river which made the residence so valuable to Washington as a point of observation.

It is a rough gray stone mansion, a story and a half in height, with a gamble roof, and nearly fifty-six feet in depth and width. An old picture represents it as being rather an attractive house externally, and it probably was as good in all respects as any dwelling in the neighborhood.

“The Hasbrouck House” takes its name from Jonathan Hasbrouck, grandson of one of the Huguenot founders of Newburgh. It was completed in 1770, and from the first seems to have in part been used for patriotic purposes. Public meetings were held in it,

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