The Ecclesiologist, Band 22

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Cambridge Camden Society, 1864
 

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Seite 192 - THE HISTORY OF OUR LORD, as exemplified in Works of Art, with that of His Types, St. John the Baptist, and other persons of the Old and New Testament.
Seite 67 - On the Egyptian Obelisks in Rome, and Monoliths, as Ornaments of Great Cities ; read at the Ordinary General Meeting of the Royal Institute of British Architects, May 31. 1858, by the Rev. Richard Burgess, BD Followed by remarks on the application of the Entasis to the Obelisk, by John Bell, Esq. Together with discussions upon the whole subject by members of the Institute.
Seite 317 - ... interficiendos a maximo usque ad minimum et ad praedas adducendas. Et ipse cum parte exercitus quam sibi elegit, intravit villam de Werkeurd et earn combussit, et interfecit in ea omnes quos invenit, viros et mulieres, magnos et parvos : et fecit satellites suos...
Seite 194 - ... this time commence the triumphs of art proper — the glories of colour, the feats of anatomical skill, the charms of chiaroscuro, and the revels of free-handling ; all claiming to be admired for themselves, all requiring the subject to bend to their individualities. Here, therefore, there is little to say, however much to delight in. This is art alone — as much as, in another sense, the Dutch school is art alone — taking its forms from elevated or from homely nature, and accordingly producing...
Seite 328 - Gloriae,' victory over the old enemy, surrounds a head of divine peace. He is restored to His own, and rests among them with a security as if He knew the loving hands so quietly and mournfully busied about Him. And His peace is with them already : ' Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you.' In this picture it is as if the pious artist had sought first the kingdom of God, and all things, even in Art, had been added unto him. He who could hardly set a figure in action, or paint the development...
Seite 193 - VOL. 1. c painters may be said to have done the reverse. The transition from the one to the other, considered in a general way, is a curious scale, beginning with moral and ending with physical indications. Thus reverence is seen first, endowing scenes devoid of almost every other quality with a pious propriety, which, if not Art, is its best foundation. Then came a certain stereotyped dignity of forms, descended from Byzantine tradition; to this followed expression of feeling and dramatic action,...
Seite 25 - We must now proceed to the two great poems which were produced at the end of the eleventh or beginning of the twelfth century.
Seite 328 - Accademia there, is the perfect realisation of the most pious idea. No more Christian conception of the subject, and no more probable setting forth of the scene, can perhaps be attained. All is holy sorrow, calm and still ; the figures move gently and speak in whispers. No one is too excited to help, or not to hinder. Joseph and Nicodemus, known by their glories, are highest in the scale of reverential beings who people the ladder, and make it almost look as if it lost itself, like Jacob's, in heaven....
Seite 155 - The roofs, floor, and what else was therein, were consumed — these rooms, courts, and offices are appropriated to the same place wherein they were kept formerly, but much more regular and loftier, and more substantially built.
Seite 112 - I am directed by the Committee of Council on Education to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, dated December 19.

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