The Dawn of the XIXth Century in England: A Social Sketch of the Times, Band 1

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T.F. Unwin, 1886 - 476 Seiten

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Seite 292 - ... in Guild-Hall yard but the mayor liked his company so well, and was grown so intimate, that he pursued him hastily, and, catching him fast by the hand, cried out with a vehement oath and accent, Sir, you shall stay and take t'other bottle.
Seite 144 - SIR AND BROTHER, — Called to the throne of France by Providence, and by the suffrages of the senate, the people, and the army, my first sentiment is a wish for peace. France and England abuse their prosperity. They may contend for ages ; but do their governments well fulfil the most sacred of their duties, and will not so much blood, shed uselessly, and without a view to any end, condemn them in their own . consciences ? I consider it as no disgrace to make the first step.
Seite 206 - The Earl of Chatham, with his sword drawn Stood waiting for Sir Richard Strachan ; Sir Richard, longing to be at 'em, Stood waiting for the Earl of Chatham.
Seite 89 - He was too much agitated to make it advisable for me to prolong the conversation ; I therefore made no answer, and he retired to his apartment repeating the last phrase. " It is to be remarked, that all this passed loud enough to be overheard by two hundred people who were present; and I am persuaded that there was not a single person who did not feel the extreme impropriety of his conduct, and the total want of dignity, as well as of decency, on the occasion.
Seite 3 - In this situation it can for the present only remain for His Majesty to pursue, in conjunction with other Powers, those exertions of just and defensive war, which his regard to the happiness of his subjects will never permit him either to continue beyond the necessity in which they originated, or to terminate on any other grounds than such as may best contribute to the secure enjoyment of their tranquillity, their constitution, and their independence.
Seite 146 - Continent, with whom he is engaged in confidential connexions and relations, and particularly with the Emperor of Russia, who has given the strongest proofs of the wisdom and elevation o'f the sentiments with which he is animated, and the lively interest which he takes in the safety and independence of Europe.
Seite 144 - Your majesty has gained more within ten years, both in territory and riches, than the whole extent of Europe. Your nation is at the highest point of prosperity ; what can it hope from war ? — To form a coalition with some powers of the continent ? The continent will remain tranquil ; a coalition can only increase the preponderance and continental greatness of France.
Seite 163 - Hawkesbury moved an address to his majesty, praying, " that he would be graciously pleased to order...
Seite 145 - Finances founded on flourishing agriculture can never be destroyed. To take from France her colonies ? The Colonies are to France only a secondary object ; and does not your Majesty already possess more than you know how to preserve ? If your Majesty would but reflect, you must perceive that the war is without an object, without any presumable result to yourself. Alas ! what a melancholy prospect to cause two nations to fight merely for the sake of fighting.
Seite 145 - France her colonies ? — the colonies are to France only a secondary object ; and does not your majesty already possess more than you know how to preserve ? If your majesty would but reflect, you must perceive that the war is without an object, without any presumable result to yourself. Alas ! what a melancholy prospect, to cause two nations to fight merely for the sake of fighting ! The world is sufficiently large for our two nations to live in it, and reason is sufficiently powerful to discover...

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