Scientific Dialogues: Intended for the Instruction and Entertainment of Young People: in which the First Principles of Natural and Experimental Philosophy are Fully Explained

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Knight and Son, 1852 - 362 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

Of the Laws of Motion
24
Of the Laws of Motion
27
Of the Mechanical Powers
33
Of the Lever
35
Of the Lever
37
Of the Wheel and Axis
41
Of the Pulley
43
Of the Inclined Plane
45
Of the Wedge
47
Of the Screw
49
Of the Pendulum
51
Of the fixed Stars
53
Of the fixed Stars
56
Of the fixed Stars and Ecliptic
58
Of the Ephemeris
61
Conversation Page XII Of the Equation of Time 83
63
Of the Solar system
65
Of the figure of the Earth
67
Of the diurnal Motion of the Earth
71
Of Day and Night
74
Of the annual Motion of the Earth
76
Of the Seasons
77
Of the Seasons
80
Of Leap Year
87
Of the Moon
88
Of Eclipses
92
Of the Tides
95
Of the Harvest Moon
97
Of Mercury
101
Of Venus
102
Of Jupiter
106
Of Saturn
107
Of the Herschel Planet
108
Of Comets
110
Of the Sun
111
Of the fixed Stars
112
Introduction
114
Of the Weight and Pressure of Fluids
118
Of the Weight and Pressure of Fluids
121
Of the Lateral Pressure of Fluids
124
Of the Hydrostatic Paradox
129
Of the Pressure of Fluids against the Sides of Vessels
131
Of the Motion of Fluids
135
Of the motion of Fluids
137
Of the Specific Gravity of Bodies
140
Of the Specific Gravity of Bodies
142
Of the Methods of finding the Specific Gravity of Bodies
148
Bodies
150
Of the Methods of finding the Specific Gravity of Bodies
153
Of the Hydrometer
155
Of the Hydrometer and Swimming
158
Of the Syphon and Tantaluss Cup
160
Of the Divers Bell
163
Of the Divers Bell
165
Of Pumps
167
Of the ForcingpumpFire engineRopepump Chainpumpand Waterpress
169
PNEUMATICS Conversation Pv I Of the Nature of Air
173
Of the Airpump
175
Of the Torricellian Experiment
178
Of the Speaking Trumpet
201
Of the Echo
203
Of the Winds
209
Of the Steamengine
213
Of the Steamengine
216
Of the Steam engine and Papins Digester
218
Of the Barometer
221
Of the Barometer and its Application to the Measur ing of Altitudes
223
Of the Thermometer
226
XXIt Of the Thermometer
228
Of the Pyrometer and Hygrometer
230
the Smallness and Velocity of its Particles
236
Reflection and Refraction
239
Refraction of Light
243
Refraction and Reflection of Light
244
Different Kinds of Lenses
247
Parallel diverging and converging Rays
250
Images of Objects Scioptric Ball c
253
Nature and Advantages of Light
255
Colours
257
Reflected Light and Plain Mirrors
259
Concave Mirrors
261
Concave Mirrors Experiments
264
Concave and Convex Mirrors
265
Optical Deceptions Anamorphoses c
268
Different Parts of the Eye
271
Conversation Page XVI Manner of Vision
272
Spectacles and their Uses
275
Rainbow
277
Refracting Telescope
280
Reflecting Telescopes
283
Microscope
285
Camera Obscure Magic Lanthorn and Multiplying Glass
289
The magnet
292
Magnetic Attraction and Repulsion
294
Methods of making Magnets
296
Mariners Compass
298
Early History of Electricity
301
Electrical Attraction and Repulsion
303
Electrical Machine
306
Electrical Machine
309
Electrical Attraction and Repulsion
311
Electrical Attraction and Repulsion
315
The Leyden Phial
317
Lanes Electrometer and the Electrical Battery
320
Experiments with the Battery
323
Miscellaneous Experiments
327
Electrophorus Electrometer ThunderHouse c
329
Atmospherical Electricity
331
Of Atmospheric Electricityof Falling Stars Aurora BorealisWaterSpouts and Whirlwinds Earthquakes
334
Medical Electricity
338
Animal Electricityof the Torpedoof the Gym notus Electricusof the Silurus Electricus
340
General Summary of Electricity with Experiments
342
Of Galvanism its Origin Experimentsof the Decomposition of Water
345
Galvanic Light and Shocks
348
Galvanic Conductors Circles Tables Experiments
350
Miscellaneous Experiments
354
Glossary and Index
357

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Seite 254 - Thus with the year Seasons return, but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine; But cloud instead, and ever-during dark Surrounds me, from the cheerful ways of men Cut off, and for the book of knowledge fair Presented with a universal blank Of nature's works to me expunged and rased, And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out.
Seite 85 - evidence of things not seen," in the fulness of Divine grace ; and was profound on this, the greatest concern of human life, while unable even to comprehend how the " inclination of the earth's axis to the plane of its orbit" could be the cause of the change of the seasons.
Seite 159 - It is not so generally known as it ought to be, that the...
Seite 90 - Its situation with respect to the sun is much like that of the earth ; and by a rotation on its axis it enjoys an agreeable variety of seasons, and of day and night.
Seite 318 - Leyden, of much eminence, said that " he felt himself struck in his arms, shoulders, and breast, so that he lost his breath ; and it was two days before he recovered from the effects of the blow and the terror ; adding, that he would not take a second shock for the kingdom of France.
Seite 98 - At the equator, the north and south poles lie in the horizon, and therefore the ecliptic makes the same angle southward with the horizon when Aries rises, as it does northward when Libra rises...
Seite 6 - ... of an inch in diameter ; and as the drop occupied a circle on a plate of glass containing 529 of these squares, there must have been in this single drop of water, taken out of the yellowishgreen sea, in a place by no means the most discoloured, about 26,450 animalcules.
Seite 112 - Addison very justly observes, this thought is far from being extravagant, when we consider that the universe is the work of infinite power, prompted by infinite goodness ; having an infinite space to exert itself in ; so that our imaginations can set no bounds to it.
Seite 19 - For the broader the base, and the nearer the line of direction is to the middle of it, the more firmly does a body stand ; but if the line of direction fall near the edge the body is easily overthrown.
Seite 272 - I mean by a figure, taking an arrow again as an illustration. As every point of an object ABC sends out rays in all directions some rays from each point on the side next the eye, will fall upon the cornea between...

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