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secretary, and dated the 23d of October, 1783 ; setting forth, that he was elected, on the 27th of June last, by joint ballot of both houses of assembly, a delegate to represent that commonwealth in the Congress of the United States of America.

Mr. S. Osgood, who produced a letter from the said J. Avery, dated 9th July, 1783, informing him, that he was elected that day by joint ballot of the senate and house of representatives, agreeable to the constitution, to serve as a delegate from that commonwealth in the United States in Congress assembled, for one year, to commence the first Monday in November.

RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. Mr. W. Ellery and Mr. D. Howell, who referred to the credentials read in Congress the 30th of June last, and registered in book of credentials, page 76.

CONNECTICUT. Mr. S. Huntington and Mr. B. Huntington, who produced credentials under the seal of the state, and signed George Wyllis, secretary ; by which it appears, that at a general assembly of the governor and company of the state of Connecticut, in America, holden at Hartford, on the second Thursday of May, A. D. 1783, the honorable Samuel Huntington, the honorable Oliver Ellsworth, the honorable Oliver Wolcott, the honorable Benjamin Huntington, Jedediah Strong, esq. Stephen Mix Mitchell, esq. and the honorable Richard Law, were elected and publicly declared to be delegates to represent that state in the Congress of the United States, according to law.

NEW-YORK. Mr. James Duane, who referred to the credentials of the delegates of that state, produced and read the 25th of November, 1782, and registered in the book of credentials, page 48.

NEW JERSEY. Mr. E. Boudinot, who referred to the credentials of the delegates of that state, produced and read in Congress the 5th of November, 1782, and registered in the book of credentials, page 46.

MARYLAND. Mr. D. Carroll, who referred to the credentials of the delegates of that state, produced and read in Congress, and registered in the book of credentials, page 67.

Mr. J. M'Henry, who referred to the credentials produced by him and read in Congress 11th of June, 1783, and registered in the book of credentials, page 71.

VIRGINIA. Mr. J. F. Mercer and Mr. A. Lee, who produced an extract from the journal of the house of delegates of that state, dated Friday, 6th June, 1783, and signed John Beckley, clerk, H. D. by which it appears, that on that day, Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Hardy, John Francis Mercer, Arthur Lee, and James Monroe, esqrs. were elected by joint ballot of the senate and house of delegates, delegates to represent that state in Congress for one year, fiom the 1st Monday in November.

NORTH-CAROLINA. Mr. Hawkins, and Mr Williamson, who referred to the credentials of the delegates for that state produced and read in Congress 14th May, 1783, and registered in the book of credentials, page 68.

SOUTH-CAROLINA. Mr. J. Reed, who referred to credentials produced by him and read in Congress the 17th June, 1783, and registered in book of credentials, page 72.

Mr. R. Beresford, who referred to credentials produced by him and read in Congress the 30th May, 1783, and registered in book of credentials, page 76.

Seven states being represented, they proceeded to the choice of a president; and, the ballots being taken, the honorable Thomas Miffin was elected.

The president not being present, the states proceeded to the choice of a chair. man; and, the ballots being taken, the hon. Daniel Carroll was elected.

On motion of Mr. Duane, seconded by Mr. M•Henry,

Resolved, That the thanks of Congress be given to the hon. Elias Boudinot, late president of Congress, in testimony of their approbation of his conduct in the chair, and in the execution of public business."

On motion of Mr. Howell, seconded by Mr. Osgood,

Resolved, That all committees appointed by the last Congress, and having business before them be, and they are hereby authorized to proceed in the same, and that they make report as soon as may be.

On a report from the Secretary at war, to whom was referred a letter from colonel Moylan:

Resolved, That colonel Stephen Moylan, colonel Samuel Elbert, colonel Charles ('otesworth Pinckney, and colonel William Russel, be promoted to the rank of bu gadiers by brevet.

On the report of a committee, consisting of Mr. Clark, Mr. Peters and Mr. S. Huntington, to whom was referred a letter of the 4th October, from the paymaster general,

Resolved, That the pay-master general be informed, that all moneys drawn on account of pay, by commanding officers and pay-masters of reginients, and not paid over to the officers and soldiers of the corps for which such pay was drawn, should be accounted for in the settlement of their accounts with the pay-master general; and such accounting will be a sufficient discharge to the commanding officers and pay-masters respectively,

Resolved, That the pay-master general deposit in the hands of regimental agents, the certificates for the arrears of pay due to the officers and soldiers of the respective lines, to be by them delivered to the individuals to whom they belong, or deposited for their benefit as the supreme executive of the state to which the respective agents belong, shall direct.

Resolved, that the superintendent of finance, take measures for compelling the officers late in the issuing department, forth with to furnish the pay-master general, with accounts against the officers of the respective lines, for articles furnished out of the public magazines in that department, to the end, that no , further delay may prevent the adjustment of the accounts of those officers with the pay-master general.

On a report of the secretary at war:

Resolved, That John Pierce, pay-master general, be directed to settle the accounts of captain Pendleton, for himself and company of artificers and those of the late regiment of colonel Bedle, and give certificates of the balance or balances, should there be any due, as is given to the line of the army.

On motion of Mr. M`Henry, seconded by Mr. Gerry,

Resolved, That the chairman, in the absence of the president, be, and he is hereby empowered and directed to adjourn Congress on the 6th instant, to meet at Annapolis on the 26th, agreea Sle to the resolution of the 21st of October last.

TUESDAY, November 4, 1785.
Mr. Jefferson, a delegate for Virginia, attended, and took his seat.

Congress took into consideration the report of the committee appointed to enquire fully into the proceedings of the department of war, and the same being read:

Ordered, That it be entered on the journals. The report is as follows:

The committee, consisting of Mr. Rutledge, Mr. Peters, Mr. Carroll, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Bland, appointed to enquire into the proceedings of the department of war, and to report the result of their enquiries; report,

That they have enquired fully into the proceedings of the department of war, from the first Monday in January, to the first Monday in July, 1782, and from that time, until the first Monday in January, 1783, and find that the secretary at war, hath faithfully executed and discharged the several powers and duties committed to and required of him, by the resolves of Congress.

On motion of Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Osgood,

Resolved, That Samuel Hodgdon, commissary of military stores, under the appointment of the secretary at war, be continued in that office until the further order of Congress, and that he be empowered to continue such assistants as may be necessary to take care of the military stores.

That Joseph Carleton, secretary in the war-office, be continued in office until the further orders of Congress.

That the secretary at war instruct Mr. Hodgdon, not to remove from the town of Providence, in the state of Rhode Island, and the Head of Elk, the military stores at present deposited at those places respectively, till the further orders of Congress.

On motion of Mr. Gerry, seconded by Mr. Williamson,

ay Lay

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Resolved, That the chairman of Congress, in the absence of the president, give the necessary directions respecting the president's household.

On the report of a committee, consisting of Mr. Osgood, Mr. Williamson and Mr. Tilton, to whom was referred a letter of the 30th March last, from majorgeneral Lincoln:

Resolved, That major-general Lincoln be credited, in the books of the treasury, the sum of 5,424,109 dollars, and that the several departments be charged with the amount of the bills drawn in their favor: And that all such bills as may hereafter be presented for payment, be charged to the departments in whose favor, from the face of the bill, they shall appear to have been drawn; and that major-general Lincoln bé credited for the amount thereof.

A motion was made by Mr. Gerry, seconded, by Mr. M`Henry,

That the commander in chief be authorized and directed, after the evacuation of New York by the British forces, to discharge the federal army, except 500 men, with proper officers, or such number as he may judge necessary for garrisoning the posts, and guarding the public magazines of the United States : And that this motion be referred to the commander in chief, to take order.

On the question to agree to this, the yeas and nays being required by Mr.
M•Henry,
Massachusetts, Mr. Gerry,

Lav |Virginia, Mr. Jefferson, no
Osgood, ay ay

Mercer,

ay Say Rhode Island, Mr. Ellery, Howell,

N.-Carolina, Mr. Hawkins,
Connecticut, Mr. S. Huntington, ay z

Williamson,
B. Huntington, ay so

is.-Carolina, Mr. Read, Maryland, Mr. Carroll, ayo..

Beresford,
M'Henry, ay say
So the question was lost.
On motion of Mr. S. Huntington, seconded by Mr. Williamson,

Resolved, That the resolution passed yesterday, empowering the chairman to adjourn Congress on the 6th, be re-considered and altered to the 4th.

On motion, Resolved, That this Congress be, and it is hereby adjourned to meet at Annapolis on the 26th of this present month.

ANNAPOLIS. * A number of members met according to adjournment, but there not being a sufficient number of states assembled to proceed to business, Congress was adjourned from day to day, til

SATURDAY, December 15, 1783,
When the following states and members appeared:
From New Hampshire, Mr. A Foster,

Maryland, Mr. M'Henry,
Massachusetts, Mr. E. Gerry,

Mr. E. Lloyd,
Mr, S. Osgood,

Virginia, Mr. T. Jefferson,
Mr. G. Patridge,

Mr. S. Hardy,
Rhode Island, Mr. W. Ellery,

Mr. A. Lee,
Mr. D. Howell,

Mr. J. Monie,
Pennsylvania, Mr. T. Mimin,

North-Carolina, Mr. Hawkins,
Mr. C. Morris,

Mr. H. Williamson,
Delaware, Mr. J. Tilton,

Mr. R. D. Spaight, Mr. E. M'Comb,

South-Carolina, Mr. J. Read, The delegates for Pennsylvania and Maryland produced credentials, which were read.

The president then laid before Congress, a joint letter from the ministers of the United States at Paris, dated at Passy, the 10th of September, 1789, accompanied with the definitive treaty between Great-Britain and the United States of America, signed at Paris, the 3d of September, 1783, which were read.

MONDAY, December 15, 1783. Mr. J. T. Chase, a delegate for Maryland, attended, and produced credentials; whereby it appears, that on the 9th of this present month, Mr. John Hall and Mr. Jeremiah Townley Chase, were duly elected additional members, to represent the said state in Congress.

Sis states only attending, namely, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia and North-Carolina; and from the state of Maryland, Mr. Chase, and from New Hampshire, Mr. Foster, the president adjourned Congress to 10 o'clock to-morrow.

TUESDAY, December 16, 1783. Congress assembled : Present seven states, viz. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and North-Carolina; and from the state of New Hampshire, Mr. Foster.

The letters from the ministers of the United States at foreign courts, were read, and referred to a committee.

WEDNESDAY, December 17, 1783. Only six states attending, namely, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia and North Carolina; and from the state of Maryland, Mr. Chase, the president adjourned Congress to ten o'clock to-morrow.

THURSDAY, Decender 18, 1783. Congress assembled : Present seven states, viz. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina; and from the state of New Hampshire, Mr. Foster.

Sundry letters and memorials were read, among which a letter of the 23d November, from the minister plenipotentiary of the United Netherlands, and a pote respecting the capture and condemnation of the sloop Chester, and a letter of the 28th of October, from governor Hancock, in behalf of the government of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, which were committed.

FRIDAY, December 19, 1783. Congress assembled: Present as before; and from the state of South-Carolina, Mr. Read.

SATURDAY, December 20, 1783. Congress assembled : Present as before.

A letter, of this day, from the commander in chief, was read, informing Congress of his arrival in this city, with the intention of asking leave to resign the commission he has the honor of holding in their service, and desiring to know their pleasure in what manner it will be most proper to offer his resignation; whether in writing or at an audience; Whereupon, .

Resolred, That his excellency the commander in chief be admitted to a public audience, on Tuesday next, at twelve o'clock.

Resolved, That a public entertainment be given to the commander in chief on Monday next.

On motion of Mr. Monroe, seconded by Mr. M`Henry,

Ordered, That an authenticated copy of the act passed by the United States in Congress assembled, the 13th of September last, relative to the act of the legislature of Virginia, of the 20 January, 1781, be transmitted by express, to the executive of Virginia.

MONDAY, December 22, 1783.
Congress assembled: Present, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania,
Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North-Carolina; and from the state of New-
Hampshire, Mr. Foster, and froin the state of South-Carolina, Mr. Read.

TUESDAY, December 23, 1783.
Congress assembled : Present as before.
On motion of Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Jefferson,

Resolved, That letters be immediately despatched to the executives of NewHampshire, Connecticut, New-York, New Jersey, South-Carolina and Georgia, informing them, that the safety, honor and good faith of the United States, re

quire the immediate attendance of their delegates in Congress ; that there have not been, during the sitting of Congress at this place, more that seven states represented, namely: Massachusetts, Rhode-Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and North-Carolina, and most of those by only two delegates ; and that the ratification of the definitive treaty, and several other matters, of great national concern, are now pending before Congress, which require the utmost despatch, and to which the assent of at least nine states is necessary.

According to order, his excellency the commander in chief was admitted to a public audience, and being seated, the president, after a pause, informed him, that the United States in Congress assembled, were prepared to receive his communications; Whereupon, he arose and addressed as follows:

MR.PRESIDENT: The great events on which my resignation depended, having at length taken place, I have now the honor of offering my sincere congratulations to Congress, and of presenting myself before them, to surrender into their hands the trust committed to me, and to claim the indulgence of retiring from the service of my country.

Happy in the confirmation of our independence and sovereignty, and pleased with the opportunity afforded the United States, of becoming a respectable nation, I resign with satisfaction the appointment I accepted with diffidence; a diffidence in my abilities to accomplish so arduous a task; which however was superseded by a confidence in the rectitude of our cause, the support of the supreme power of the union, and the patronage of Heaven.

The sticcessful termination of the war has verified the most sanguine expectations; and my gratitude for the interposition of Providence, and the assistance I have received from my countrymen, increases with every review of the momentous contest.

While I repeat my obligations to the army in general, I should do injustice to my own feel. ings not to acknowledge, in this place, the peculiar services and distinguished merits of the gentlemen who have been attached to my person during the war. It was impossible the choice of confidential officers to compose my family should have been more fortunate. Permit me, sir, to recommend in particular, those who have continued in the service to the present moment, as worthy of the favorable notice and patronage of Congress.

I consider it an indispensable duty to close this last act of my official life by commending the interests of our dearest country to the protection of Almighty God, and those who have the superintendence of them to his holy keeping

Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of action, and bidding an affectionate farewell to this august body, under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life.

He then advanced and delivered to the president his commission, with a copy of his address, and having resumed his place, the president returned him the following answer : .

Sir, The United States in Congress assembled, receive with emotions, too affecting for utterance, the solemn resignation of the authorities under which you have led their troops with success through a perilous and a doubtful war. Called upon by your country to defend its invaded rights, you accepted the sacred charge, before it had formed alliances, and whilst it was without funds or a government to support you. You have conducted the great military contest with wisdom and fortitude, invariably regarding the rights of the civil power through all disasters and changes. You have, by the love and confidence of your fellow-citizens, enabled them to display their martial genius, and transmit their fame to posterity. You have persevered, till these United States, aided by a magnanimous king and nation, have been enabled, under a just Providence, to close the war in freedom, safety and independence ; on which happy event we sincerely join you in congratulations.

Haying defended the standard of liberty in this new world: having taught a lesson useful to those whoinAiet and to those who feel oppression, you retire from the great theatre of action, with the blessings of your fellow-citizens, but the glory of your virtues will not terminate with your military command, it will continue to animate remotest ages.

We feel with you our obligations to the army in general, and will particularly charge our. selves with the interests, of those confidential officers, who have attended your person to this affecting moment.

We join you in commending the sterests of our dearest country to the protection of Almighty God, beseeching him to dispose the hearts and minds of its citizens, to improve the opportunity afforded them, of becoming a happy and respectable nation. And for you we ad. dress to him our earnest prayers, that a life so beloved, may be fostered with all his care ; that your days may be happy as they have been illustrious; and that he will finally give you that reward which this world cannot give.

WEDNESDAY, December 24, 1783. Congress assembled : Present as before.

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