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Scleroi, Mr. Rutledge,

Georgia, Mr. Telfair,
Ramsay, ay ay

N. W. Jones, no no
Middleton, DOS

Few,

no ) Soit passed in the negative.

On motion, the resolution was postponed, and a motion was made by Mr. Madison, seconded by Mr. Bland, in the words following:

General Greene, commanding the army of the United States in the southern department, having represented to Congress that the appointment of a brrgavier-general, to command a brigade in the Maryland line of the army, was rendered expedient by the proposed formation of the said line into two brigades, and having recommended colonel Otho Williams, as an officer whose distinguished talents and services give him a just pretension to such appointment, which recommendation is also supported by the testimony of the com. mander in chief in favour of the said officer :

Resolved, That in consideration of the distinguished talents and services of colonel Otho Williams, he be, and hereby is appointed a brigadier-general in the army of the United States."

A motion was made by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Jones, " that the consideration of this motion be postponed ;" and on the question for postponing, the yeas and nays being required by Mr. Scott, Hesachusetts, Mr. Patridge,

Delaware, Mr. Dickinson,
Osgood,

Wharton,
Prade-Island, Mr. Ellery,

no | Maryland, Mr. Carroll, Cornell,

Wright,
Ceragedicut, Mr. Law,

Virginia, Mr. Madison,
Root,

Bland,
Ne Fers, Pr. Scott,

div. 1S.-Carolina, Mr. Rutledge, Floyd,

Ramsay,

no ne Nedozy, Wr. Clark, ay 2

Middleton,
Boudinot, no Say Georgia, Mr. Telfair,
Condict, ay)

N. W. Jones,
Penskbania, Mr. Montgomery, no

Few,
Smith,

Sno
Clymer,
Atlee,

no)
Sa it passed in the negative.

A division was then called for, and on the question to agree to the preamble; the reas and pays being required by Mr. Scott, Messachusetts, Mr. Patridge, ay2 Delawure, Mr. Dickinson,

ay ay

Wharton,
Rhode Island, Mr. Ellery,

Mr. Carroll,
Cornell,

Wright,
Currecticut, Mr. Law,

\Virginia, Mr. Madison, Root,

Bland, New York, Mr. Scott,

no ? div.

13.-Carolina, Mr. Rutledge, Floyd,

Ramsay,
Nes Jersey, Mr. Clark,

Middleton,
Boudinot, ay no Georgia, Mr. Telfair,
Condict, no

N. W. Jones, no no Penzylcania, Mr. Montgomery, ay?

Few,
Smith,
Clymer,

Atlee,
So it was resolved in the affirmative.
On the question to agree to the resolution, resolved in the affirmative.

MONDAY, May 13, 1782. According to order, the hon. the minister of France being admitted to a publie audience, addressed Congress in a speech, of which the following is a translation :

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GENTLEMEN OF THE CONGRESS : Since the alliance so happily concluded be. tween the king my master and the United States, you have taken too intimate a part in every event which interested his glory and happiness, not to learn with sincere joy, that Providence has granted a dauphin to the wishes of the king your ally, and to those of France. His majesty imparts this event, gentlemen, in the letter which I am directed to have the honor of delivering.

The connexions which unite the two nations, connexions formed in justice and humanity, and strengthened by mutual interests, will be as durable as they are natural The prince who is just born will one day be the friend and ally of the United States. He will, in his turn, support them with all his power, and while in his dominions he shall be the father and protector of his people, he will be here the supporter of your children, and the guarantee of their freedom.

The letter from his most Christian majesty was then delivered and read, of which the following is a translation :

VERY DEAR GREAT FRIENDS AND ALLIES: Satisfied with the interest you take in every event which affects us, we are anxious to inform you of the precious mark which Divine Providence has just given us of his goodness, and of the protection he has granted to our kingdoin. We do not doubt that you will partake in the joy we feel on the birth of our son the dauphin, of whom the queen, our most dear spouse, is just now happily delivered. You will easily be convinced of the pleasure with which we shall receive every proof that you may give of your sensibility upon this occasion. We cannot renew, at a period more affecting to us, the assurance of our affection and of our constant friendship for you. Upon which we pray God that he would have you, very dear great friends and allies, in his holy keeping. Written at Versailles, the 22d of October, 1781. Your good friend and ally,

LOUIS. Underneath,

GRAVIER DE VERGENNES. The president then addressed the minister as follows:

Sir : The repeated instances of friendship which the United States of America have received from his most Christian inajesty, give hiin too just a title to their affections to permit them to be indifferent to any event which interests his happiness. Be assured, sir, that Congress learn with the most lively satisfaction, that it has pleased the Divine Giver of all good gifts, to bless their august ally with an heir to his throne. Our earnest prayer is, that he may with it inherit the virtues which have acquired to his majesty so much glory, and to his dominions so much prosperity, and which will be the means of cementing and strengthening the union so happily established between the two nations; an union the mutual advantages of which daily become more conspicuous, and which has derived new lustre and additional force from every effort of the common enemy to dissolve it. Congress do pot enlarge upon this subject, but satisfy themselves with the representations which your own observations will enable you, and your regard to the interests of both countries will induce you to make of the affectionate attachinent which every rank of people within these states manifest to your sovereign, and of their inviolable fidelity to the principles of the alliance.

Ordered, That a letter be written to the commander in chief, and to the commander in the southern department, by the secretary for foreign affairs, informing them of the public annunciation of the birth of the dauphin, that the same may be published in both armies with such demonstrations of joy as their commanders shall respectively direct:

That the secretary for foreign affairs also inform the governors and presi. dents of the respective states, of the birth of an heir to the crown of France that the people of each state may partake in the joy which an event that se nearly affects the happiness of their great and generous ally cannot fail to excite

TUESDAY, May 14, 1782. A letter, of the 10th, from the commander in chief, was read, enclosing a copy of a letter to him from sir Guy Carleton, dated head-quarters, NewYork, 7th May, 1782; wherein he expresses a desire to receive a passport for the passage of Mr. Morgan to Philadelphia, for the purpose of carrying a letter of compliment to Congress ; Whereupon,

On motion of Mr. Rutledge, seconded by Mr. Telfair,

Resolved, That the commander in chief be, and hereby is, directed to refuse the request of sir Guy Carleton, of a passport for Mr. Morgan to bring despatches to Philadelphia.

THURSDAY, May 16, 1782. On a report from the secretary at war,

Resolved, That a purveyor be appointed for the southern army, and that Thursday next be assigned for the election.

Resolved, That the pay-master general be, and he is hereby, authorized to appoiot a deputy pay-master to reside with the main army.

MONDAY, May 20, 1782. Mr. John Lowell, a delegate for the state of Massachusetts, attended and produced credentials, dated in council, May 7th, by which it appears that the hon. James Sullivan and the said J. Lowell, esqrs. were chosen in the room of the hon. S. Adams and A. Ward, esqrs. resigned. Ordered, That Mr. Patridge have leave of absence.

TUESDAY, May 21, 1782. On the report of a committee, consisting of Mr. Ellery, Mr. Clymer, Mr. Boudinot, to whom was referred a letter of the 24th of April, from the governor of Connecticut :

Resolved, That the executives of the several states be, and they are hereby authorized, on information of illegal intercourse, which hath taken place or shall take place between the captains of any private armed vessels belonging to these states and the enemy, or of any other mal-conduct to suspend the commission of such captains until the executive shall have examined into the offence; and if upon enquiry it shall appear that the information was well founded, they are requested to report their proceedings to the United States in Congress assembled, and in this case the commission shall stand suspended until Congress shall have taken order thereon.

On motion, and at the desire of the delegates of Georgia :

Resolved, That it be minuted on the journal, that on their motion such part of the letter of the 11th of January, 1782, from the assembly of Georgia, as respects the settlement of public accounts, was yesterday referred to the Superintendent of finance.

Mr. Scott, a delegate for the state of New York, delivered at the table two papers which he desired to have read; and the same being read, a motion was made by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Middleton, in the following words :

That two papers which have been this day read in Congress, purporting to be certified by Robert Harpur, deputy secretary of the state of New York, as true copies of two certain original acts of the legislature of the said state lodged in the secretary's office of the said state : the one in the words and figures following, to wit, ** An act for pardoni g certain offences committed in the north-eastern partof this state. Passed the legislature, represented that they were seduced and misled by artful and designing men, from their duty and allegiance to this state: and have moreover professed a sincere rup ntance of their crimes and misdemeanors, and implored the clemency of government, and humbly entreated the passing of an act of indemnity, oblivion and pardon: and this legislature being disposed to extend mercy:

14th April, 1782. *Whereas divers inhabitants residing in the north-eastern part of this state, who have heretofore denied the sovereignty and jurisdiction of the people of this state in and over that part of this state, and by their unwarrantable combinations, created cominotions, to the great Osturbance of the peace aud tranquillity of this state, have by their humble petition to the

“Be it therefore enacted by the people of the state of New York, represented in senate and assembly, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, that all such of the inha. bitants of this state, who dwell and reside north of tlie north bounds of the state of Massachu. setts continued to Hudson's river, east of Hudson's river, south of the latitude 45 degrees north, and west of Connecticut river, are hereby acquitted, pardoned, released and discharged from all treasons, felonies and conspiracies whatsoever, at any time heretofore done and committed by them or any of them, against the people of the state of New York as sovereign thereof, or against the government and authority derived from or established by the said people; all capital, corporeal or pecuniary punishment, fines and forfeitures, judgments and executions, to which they severally were liable in consequence of the crimes and offences aforesaid, are hereby remitted and discharged ; and all and every the said persons shall be, and hereby are fully and wholly restored in person and estate, to the same state and condition wherein they severally were at any time before the said crimes and offences were committed or perpetrated.

« And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that no person or persons whatsoever shall have the benefit of the said pardon, for the purpose of pleading the same against any charge of treason or other offence already found, or hereafter to be found, against them or any of them, for adhering to the king of Great-Britain, the enemy of this state, or for any murder; or that such pardon shall be a bar to a conviction, judgment or execution for the said treason or other offence last mentioned, or for murder as aforesaid."

And the other of the said papers in the words and figures following, to wit, “ An act for quieting the minds of the inhabitants in the north-eastern parts of this state. Passed the

14th April, 1782. “Be it enacted by the people of the state of New-York, represented in senate and assembly, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, that all charters, patents or grants for lands within this state, lying within the following bounds, to wit, beginning at a certain point in the west bank of Connecticut river, where the boundary line between the states of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, if continued across the said river, would intersect the said west bank, and running from the said point along the west bank of Connecticut river to the latitude of 45 degrees north, thence westerly in the said latitude to the west side of Missisqua-Bay, in Lake-Champlain, thence westerly in the said latitude to the east bank of the waters of the said lake, thence southerly along the east bank of the said lake and the waters thereof, to the most southerly point where any of the grants heretofore issued or made by the late government of the late colony of New-Hampshire come to the said lake, thence along the south and west bounds of the said grants, or as the said grants are now held or possessed under such grants, so far south as to meet with a line continued from the first mentioned boundary, between the states of Massachusetts and New-Hampshire, through the said place or point of beginning, thence easterly by the said continued line as aforesaid to the said place or point of beginning, made or issued by the government of the late colony now state of NewHampshire, and which were made or issued prior to any charter, patent or grant for the same lands, heretofore made or issued by the government of the late colony now state of NewYork, or by the government of any other colony, shall be, and hereby are ratified and confirmed to the respective grantees, their heirs and assigns forever; and every such prior charter, patent or grant is hereby declared to be as legal and valid, to all intents, constructions and purposes whatsoever, as if the same had been made or issued under the great seal of the late colony of New-York, or had been made or issued under the great seal of this state, and as such may be given and shall be allowed in evidence in every court of record within this state: and no such charter, patent or grant hereby ratified and confirmed as aforesaid, shall be deemed void, or in any wise injured, by reason of the non-performance of any condition or provision therein contained, or by reason of the non-payment of any quit-rent therein reserved, any law, usage or custom to the contrary thereof notwithstanding: provided always, that any person or persons who heretofore held or claimed lands under grants from the late colony of New Hampshire, who have afterwards obtained grants for the same lands, either to themselves or to others in trust for them, under the late colony of New-York, operating as a confirmation thereof, in such case or cases such person or persons, or their assignees, shall be deemed forever hereafter to hold the said lands by the latter title.

“And whereas, many of the inhabitants residing within the district of country above described, did, in or about the year 1777, declare themselves an independent people, and did assume a government under the name, stile or title of the government of the state of Vermont, or of the state of Vermont, and the said assumed government hath made grants of lands within the said territory:

“Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that all charters, patents or grants of lands so made or issued before the passing of this act, and which were made or issued prior ba charter, patent or grant for the same lands beretofore made or issued by the governmes the late colony of New York, shall be, and hereby are ratified and confirmed to the repectve grantees, their heirs and assigns for ever; and such charters, patents or grants Te hereby declared to be as legal and valid to all intents, constructions and purposes whatwar, as if the same had been made or issued by the government of this state, and as such may be gives and shall be allowed in evidence in any court of record within this state ; and no such charter, patent or grant so ratified and confirmed as last aforesaid, shall be deemed void in any wise injured by reason of the non-performance of any condition or proviso theria contained, or by reason of the non-payment of any quit-rent therein reserved, any lar, age, or custom to the contrary notwithstanding

And be it further enacted by the author:ty aforesaid, that all persons now actually occupring, possessing and improving lands within the said district of country, or who did at any tite befate the passing of this act, actually occups, possess and improve lands therein, not hereure granted by any late colony, shall be, and they and their legal representatives respectrels are hereby confirmed in such their respective possessions and improvements, and shall hare and receive patents there for from the government of this state, without paying for Fica patent any fee or reward, the expense of surveymg such lands excepted: provided that to such patent as last aforesaid shall issue for more than the quantity of 5J0 acres of lands, ad ucre such occupant, possessor or improver, or legal representatives, shall not have possessed the ad quantity of 500 acres of land, he or she shall respectively be allowed and granted such additional quantity of land, out of any vacant unappropriated lands, lying con. tiguous to sich possession, as shall be equal to the deficiency.

"And whereas, it is the intention of the legislature, that such parts of this act as relate to queting or confirming tits and possessions within the district of country as aforesaid, should not take effect, and that the inliabitants residing within the said district of country should pot fare the benefits hereby intended, unless they should agree to renounce the said asPated guretimeat and return to their allegiance to the gov-rnment of this state:

"Be it therefore further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that upon application of comDisoners or agents authorized and appointed by the inhabitants residing in the said district of country, or by the inhabitants of any town or towns, or district or districts therein, to the person administering the government of this state for the time being, touching or concernng the ret fying, confirming and quieting any titles to or possessions of lands within the distact foresaid, in cases not provided for by this act, and of and concerning the mode, manner, frants and conditions agreeable to and on which the inhabitants within the district of country aforesaid, shall agree to renounce the said assumed government, and acknowledge alegiance to the government of this state, it shall and may be lawful for the person alministenag the government of this state for the time being, by and with the advice and consent

the council of appointment, to appoint and commissionate, under the great seal of this state, tate commissioners, to meet,confer and agree with such commissioners or agents authorized zad appointed by the said inhabitants of the said district of country, or by the inhabitants of ar toen de torns, or district or dis ricts therein, on all and singular the matters and things above-mentioned, and all compacts, agreements and acts entered into, made or done by the sa constanter to be appointed on behalf of this state, or any two of them, of or concerning the premises, shall be finally conclusive and binding on the government of this state: provided nevertheless, that nothing in this act contained shall be construed to authorize the usd commissioners to agree to cede or relinquish the jurisdiction of this state over the distret of country aforesaid, or any part thereof, to any people, assemblies of people, or person er persons whatsoever, or to consent or agree that any part of the constitution of this state albe altered or changed. *Aml be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that nothing in this act contained na be deemed, construed or taken to restore any person or persons, or his or their heirs, to les or their estate within the said district of country, who now stand attainted by the governfast of this state for adherence to the king of Great-Britain, or whose estate or estates have

sal become confiscate for such adherence by virtue of any law of this state;" Be committed to a special committee to report thereon :

And on the question for commitment, the yeas and nays being required by
Mr. Scott,
Manedusetts, Mr. Osgood,

Delaware, Mr. Dickinson,
Lovell,
nos"

Wharton,
A llard, Mr Ellery,

Maryland, Mr. Hanson,
Cornell,

Wright,
Canicul, Mr. Root,

Virginia, Mr. Madison, York, Mr. Scott,

Rland,
Pagania, Mr, Montgomery,

Smith,
Clymer,

Atlee,
Vol. IV.

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