Beyond Survival: Managing Academic Libraries in Transition

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Libraries Unlimited, 2007 - 220 Seiten
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One part theory (borrowed from business world), one part practice (including detailed case studies of the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Arizona), one part inspiration: Beyond Survival offers ideas about how academic libraries can not only survive in the short term, but take advantage of emergent opportunities by judiciously adopting the same organizational development tools and concepts espoused by the business world.

While there is a great deal of anecdotal evidence that significant organizational changes are taking place in academic libraries, the literature suggests that most of these changes take the form of evolutionary, or incremental improvement. But what happens when libraries find themselves in a society characterized by increased information availability compression of time and space, and growing turbulence and unpredictability?

These are conditions with which the business world has been grappling for years, conditions that require not an evolutionary approach, but nimbleness and rapid response. One part theory (borrowed from business world), one part practice (including detailed case studies of the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Arizona), one part inspiration, Beyond Survival shows you how the transition tactics and strategies developed by businesses can be adapted to academic libraries. By judiciously adopting the same organizational development tools and concepts espoused by the business world, academic libraries can not only survive in the short term, but can take advantage of emergent opportunities to ensure long-term excellence.

 

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Beyond Survival: Managing Academic Libraries in Transition

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Academic libraries must change! This message appears in print regularly, usually accompanied by dire warnings of doom if change does not happen quickly. A similar message is found here, but this new ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

1 Why Not Just Keep On Keeping On?
1
2 Theoretical Underpinnings of Change
17
3 Embedding and Perpetuating Change in Academic Libraries
41
4 Lessons in Organizational Change from the University of Arizona Libraries
67
First Cycle of Change at the University of Pittsburghs University Library System
85
6 Change Becomes a Given
111
The Second Change Cycle at ULS
127
Standing Up to Scrutiny
153
Positioning the Academic Library for a Vibrant Future
171
Appendix
195
Reference List
207
Index
215
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Über den Autor (2007)

Elizabeth J. Wood, holding an AMLS and BA in German from the University of Michigan and an MBA from Murray State University in Kentucky. Author of the first in the Greenwood Library Management Series Strategic Marketing for Libraries (1988) as well as a chapter in James Rettig's Distinguished Classics of Reference Publishing (1992), Elizabeth was keynote speaker at the 1986 LOEX Conference, has written several articles, and has presented many workshops about academic library marketing and strategic planning. A veteran of more than 30 years of academic library service and some 12 years as head of the Information Services Department at Bowling Green State University library.

Dr. Rush Miller earned the BA, MA and PhD in Medieval History along with the MLS. His library administrative career spans 32 years, including 12 years in his current position as Hillman University Librarian and Director of the University Library System at the University of Pittsburgh. Prior to Pittsburgh, he was Dean of Libraries and Learning Resources at Bowling Green State University, and Director of Libraries at Sam Houston State University and Delta State University. He has authored numerous articles and presentations dealing with subjects ranging from management, digital libraries, organizational development, fund raising, diversity, and staff development. At Pitt, he is known as an innovative leader and has launched a number of wide ranging initiatives on campus and internationally. He has served on the Boards of ARL, PALCI, PALINET, and other professional organizations.

Amy Knapp, Assistant University Librarian at the University of Pittsburgh's University Library Systems, holds an MA in English Literature, an MLS degree, and a Phd in Library Science all from the University of Pittsburgh. For several years before accepting her current position, she paid her dues and learned the realities of academic library work as Assistant Head of Database Searching and Coordinator of Library Instruction. Amy has taught classes in Information Retrieval and US Government Resources in the Graduate School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh for ten years. Her dissertation research focused on how faculty access US Federal Government documents in an electronic age. A long-time advocate of a user focus in academic libraries, she has published in the areas of faculty and student use of electronic resources and applications of LibQUAL+TM data to academic library planning and operations.

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