Slavery in the Courtroom: An Annotated Bibliography of American Cases

Cover
The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1998 - 312 Seiten

Classic analysis of the law of slavery that received the Joseph A. Andrews Award from the American Association of Law Libraries in 1986. Offers a detailed discussion and analysis of the pamphlet materials on the law of slavery published in the United States and Great Britain, and as such, provides readers with easy access to an understanding of most of the important American and British cases on slavery, including Somerset v. Stewart (Eng., 1772), The United States v. Amistad (U.S., 1841), and Dred Scott v. Sanford (U.S., 1857). Illustrated. xxvii, 312 pp.

Im Buch

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

The Slave in a Free Jurisdiction
19
Fugitive Slaves
59
Abolition and Abolitionists in the North
139
Abolitionists in the South
157
Slave Revolts
197
The African Slave Trade
211
Miscellaneous Trials and Cases
251
British Cases
271
Selected Bibliography of Secondary Sources
293
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 59 - There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; Provided, always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Seite 200 - Daniel. A journal of the proceedings in the detection of the conspiracy formed by some white people, in conjunction with Negro and other slaves, for burning the City of New- York in America, and murdering the inhabitants.
Seite 5 - The life of the law has not been logic: it has been experience. The felt necessities of the time, the prevalent moral and political theories, intuitions of public policy, avowed or unconscious, even the prejudices which judges share with their fellow men, have had a good deal more to do than the syllogism in determining the rules by which men should be governed.
Seite 6 - Next to personal security, the law of England regards, asserts, and preserves the personal liberty of individuals. This personal liberty consists- in the power of locomotion, of changing situation, or moving one's person to whatsoever place one's own inclination may direct, without imprisonment or restraint, unless by due course of law.
Seite 20 - The state of slavery is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only by positive law...
Seite 6 - And this spirit of liberty is so deeply implanted in our constitution, and rooted even in our very soil, that a slave or a negro, the moment he lands in England, falls under the protection of the laws, and so far becomes a freeman (g) ; though the master's right to his service may possibly still continue (6), (7).
Seite 150 - All men are by nature free and independent, and have certain natural and inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and of pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness.
Seite 53 - They had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations; and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect; and that the negro might justly and lawfully be reduced to slavery for his benefit.
Seite 53 - On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.
Seite 59 - Ohio, under the laws thereof, shall escape into any other of the said states or territory, the person to whom such labor or service may be due, his agent or attorney, is hereby empowered to seize or arrest such fugitive from labor, and to take him or her before any judge of the Circuit or District Courts of the United States, residing or being within the state, or before any magistrate of a county, city, or town corporate, wherein such seizure or arrest shall be made...

Über den Autor (1998)

Paul Finkelman is the President of Gratz College, in greater Philadelphia. He is the author of more than 200 scholarly articles and the author or editor of more than 50 books. He has been cited in five opinions by the U.S. Supreme Court. Before accepting the Gratz presidency he held chairs at Duke Law School, Albany Law School, LSU Law School, the University of Saskatchewan College of Law, and the University of Pittsburgh Law School, as well as the Fulbright Chair at the University of Ottawa Law School.

Bibliografische Informationen