The History of the Life of M. Tullius Cicero, Band 1

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J. J. Tourneisen; and J. L. Legrand, 1790 - 398 Seiten
 

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Seite 174 - Curius her gallant, one of the conspirators of senatorian rank, to send him a punctual account of all their deliberations. He presently imparted his intelligence to some of the chiefs of the city, who were assembled that evening as usual, at his house, informing them not only of the design, but naming the men who were to execute it, and the very hour when they would be at his gate : all which fell out exactly as he foretold ; for the two knights came before break of day, but had the mortification...
Seite 195 - ... wider than you imagine ; the Trojan horse is within our walls ; which while I am consul, shall never oppress you in your sleep. If it be asked, then, what reason I have to fear Catiline? none at all ; and I have taken care that nobody else need fear him : yet I say, that we have cause to fear those troops of his, which I see in this very place. Nor is his army so much to be dreaded, as those who are said to have deserted it : for in truth, they have not deserted, but are left by him only as spies...
Seite 205 - ... of lightning, earthquakes, &c. he could not omit what happened two years before, when the turrets of the capitol were struck down with lightning ; how the soothsayers, called together from all Etruria, declared, that fire, slaughter, the overthrow of the laws, civil war, and the ruin of the city, were portended, unless some means were found out of appeasing the gods : for which purpose they ordered a new and larger statue of...
Seite 151 - Decemvirate, or ten commiflioners, with abfolute power for five years over all the revenues of the Republic ; to diftribute them at pleafure to the Citizens, to fell and buy what lands they thought fit; to...
Seite 192 - ... never imagined, that the accusers would venture to say a word about the novelty of a family : that he himself had two patrician competitors, the one a profligate and audacious, the other an excellent and modest man ; yet that he outdid Catiline in dignity, Galba in interest ; and if that had been a crime in a new man, he should not have wanted enemies to object it to him™.
Seite 326 - ... trial, should be prohibited from fire and water *. Though Cicero was not named, yet he was marked out by the law : his crime was, the putting Catiline's accomplices to death ; which, though not done by his single authority, but by a general vote of the...
Seite 25 - Arpinum had the singular felicity to produce the most glorious contemner as well as the most illustrious improver of the ' arts and eloquence of Rome." He made no figure therefore in the gown, nor had any other way of sustaining his authority in the city, than by cherishing the natural jealousy between the Senate and the people ; that by his declared enmity to the one...
Seite 210 - The senate, indeed, as it has been said above, in cases of sudden and dangerous tumults, claimed the prerogative of punishing the leaders with death, by the authority of their own decrees : but this was looked upon as a stretch of power, and an infringement of the rights of the people, which nothing could excuse, but the necessity of times, and the extremity of danger.
Seite 24 - Scipio, from the observation of his martial talents, while he had yet but an inferior command in the army, gave a kind of prophetic...
Seite 24 - That Man : — replied he, pointing to Marius at the bottom of the table. In the field he was cautious and provident, and, while he was watching the most...

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