Letters Written During a Tour Through Normandy, Britanny, and Other Parts of France, in 1818: Including Local and Historical Descriptions; with Remarks on the Manners and Character of the People

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1820 - 322 Seiten
 

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Seite 88 - Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these ? O, I have ta'en Too little care of this ! Take physic, pomp ; Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, That thou mayst shake the superflux to them, And show the heavens more just.
Seite 62 - By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks...
Seite 251 - We hired a cabriolet, and left Auray early this morning; besides the driver, a man accompanied us, who walked by the side of the voiture, in order to render his assistance in preventing it from being upset by the large, loose, and broken rocks that strewed the way, and lie in confused heaps about the road. After travelling three leagues through a desolate and wild country, we arrived at a spot about a mile from the sea-shore, where this curious Celtic antiquity remains a monument at once of the power...
Seite 252 - formation; the stones are much broken, fallen down, and dis" placed; they consist of eleven rows, of unwrought pieces of rock " or stone, merely set up on end in the earth, without any pieces " crossing them at top. These stones are of great thickness, but " not exceeding nine or twelve feet in height; there may be some " few fifteen feet. The rows are placed from fifteen to eighteen " paces from each other, extending in length (taking rather a " semicircular direction) above half a mile, on unequal...
Seite 196 - Brittany the men wear a goat-skin dress, and look not unlike Defoe's description of Robinson Crusoe. The furry part of this dress is worn outside : it is made with long sleeves, and falls nearly below the knees.
Seite 291 - Fontevraud existed there from the eleventh century till the year 1793, when it was subverted by the Revolutionists, who drove the inhabitants from their sanctuary and both pillaged and dilapidated the convent. During that period several of the beautiful Gothic edifices were entirely demolished and others left in a ruined condition. " As Fontevraud was chosen for the burial-place of a few of our early kings, till they lost the provinces of Anjou and Maine in the time of King John, some mention of...
Seite 227 - came forward, seated us close to the fire, and " ordered more faggots to replenish it. He " pressed us to leave the inn, and begged we " would take up our residence at his house. " This we declined, but promised to breakfast " and dine with him the next day, in compliance " with his invitation, given in English, that we ." would take with him the luck of the pot. Ac" cordingly, the next morning we presented " ourselves at the door of Monsieur le Cure, " who received us in his state apartment; it...
Seite 227 - English people,' said the old gentleman ; " ' the English shall ever be welcome to rest at " my house ; I came into their country when I * was driven from my own ; I had neither friends, " money, nor their language ; for the first three " years I eat my daily meal at their cost...
Seite 236 - The countess of Montfort came down from the castle to meet them, and with a most cheerful countenance, kissed sir Walter Manny, and all his companions, one after the other, like ,a noble and valiant dame.
Seite 195 - Bretons dwell in huts, generally built of mud ; men, pigs, and children, live altogether, without distinction, in these cahins of accumulated filth and misery. The people are, indeed, dirty to a loathed excess ; and to this may be attributed their unhealthy, and even cadaverous aspect. Their manners are as wild and savage as their appearance : the only indication they exhibit of mingling at all with civilized creatures is, that whenever they meet you, they bow their heads, or take off their hats,...

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