The Golden Gems of Life, Or, Gathered Jewels for the Home Circle

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Central Publishing House, 1880 - 608 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

PowerWomans Moral InfluenceSource of Womans Happiness
88
Influence of a Happy HomeIn what a Happy Home consistsBusi
96
at HomeHome LanguageHappiness of ChildrenThe Domestic
104
by ToilDanger of overlooking this FactEarnestness the Secret
118
LaborLife necessarily RoutineLabor not an End of LifeVictories
125
AmountAll Excellence the Result of PerseveranceExample of Gib
131
EnterpriseEnterprise an InheritanceValue of SelfrelianceDemands
138
and WisdomMans Duty_Value of EnergySuccess the Result
145
the Life of the Universe The Value of TimePunctuality gives Force
151
Evil of DissipationConcentration not OnesidednessYou must
159
ionDecision of Character a Necessity of the Present Age Decision
165
on Good NameGreat Men have been SelfreliantWe admire Self
172
and Speculative AbilityKnowledge of Men Indispensable Intellectual
179
the whole of LifeEducation Right or wrongA Just Appreciation
187
Training Pleasant and within Reach of AllImportance of Reading
194
sity of Mental CultureEducating Influence of Everyday LifeMoral
201
tion of LiteratureLiterature the Soul of ActionHow to choose
207
of Bad Associates to debase youPersons whom Society has most
216
need FriendsTest of FriendshipFriendship a Tender Sentiment
223
Influence
229
Thing exerts InfluenceExamples from NatureInfluence of Great
236
acter is PowerDifference between Character and ReputationCharac
243
HealthTemperance dwells in the HeartTemperance consists in Self
252
necessary to Acquisition of WealthThe Danger of going beyond
258
of Eminent MenPatience an Element of Home Happiness PAGE
264
Government and ProgressComposure Highest Form of PowerStrong
270
Spirit of Charity always doing GoodUniversal CharityDeath
279
Should never feel ashamed of KindnessKindness not necessarily
286
has regard to Looks and ActionsLying a Cowardly TraitDanger
296
LifeDuty of doing Something for SocietyAll Social Duties Recip
367
Ennobling Quality of PolitenessThree Kinds of DignityDignity
371
Mental Qualities shown by the Toilet Beauty of SimplicityThe Style
382
TalentsAll Great Events complete themselves in SilenceModesty
397
made a StudyCourtship a Voyage of DiscoveryThe True Companion
407
nied by SorrowLoving Trust of WomanImportance of the Act
415
mony brings Cares as well as JoysMarriage not the Chief End
422
Nature of the Marriage TieGold can not purchase LoveUnhappy
429
change Human NatureLove not the Only Requisite of Domestic
436
Test of Married LoveDomestic Happiness reached through Trials
442
SelfsacrificeKeep Faults to yourselfConstant Tenderness and Care
448
selfwroughtDeath an Occasion of Much RegretShadowed Lives
457
CordTreasure of a Good MemoryMemory of Past DaysSlight
465
ing Power of HopeShould only hope for Probable ThingsHope ever
472
PAGE
482
piness like TomorrowWealth and Fame not Necessary to Happiness
494
cellenceThe Result of Individual ExertionInfluence of Youth
507
plesGood Principles ever actingFalse Principles
516
do our DutyDuty and MightDuty does not fear Censure PAGE
524
ness renders us All EqualsThe Blessings of SicknessSickness
532
GenialLife abounds in Sorrowful ScenesSorrow the Noblest of Dis
539
a Gift of PovertyThe Advantages of struggling with PovertyPoverty
545
Adversity the Touchstone of CharacterThe Uncertainty of Human
551
Influence of HopeDuty of resisting DespondencyDespondency
570
Outward ActionPrayer the Password to HeavenFamily Worship
580
leads to True ReligionPlan running through Natures WorksWon
592
Future LifeMen at All Times have pondered the Question of Death
599
The Evening of gife
603

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Seite 255 - It buries every error, covers every defect, extinguishes every resentment ! From its peaceful bosom spring none but fond regrets and tender recollections. Who can look down upon the grave, even of an enemy, and not feel a compunctious throb that he should ever have warred with the poor handful of earth that lies mouldering before him...
Seite 222 - ... nothing will supply the want of prudence; and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.
Seite 546 - The day is thine, the night also is thine: thou hast prepared the light and the sun. Thou hast set all the borders of the earth: thou hast made summer and winter.
Seite 266 - Truth is always consistent with itself, and needs nothing to help it out ; it is always near at hand, and sits upon our lips and is ready to drop out before we are aware; whereas a lie is troublesome, and sets a man's invention upon the rack, and one trick needs a great many more to make it good.
Seite 114 - ... and they go to their graves with purposes unaccomplished and wishes unfulfilled. Better for them, and for the world in their example, had they known how to wait' Believe me, the talent of success is nothing more than doing what you can do well; and doing well whatever you do, — without a thought of fame.
Seite 351 - It renounces no just right from fear. It gives up no important truth from flattery. ( It is indeed not only consistent with a firm mind, but it necessarily requires a manly spirit, and a fixed principle, in order to give it any real value. Upon this solid ground only, the polish of gentleness can with advantage be superinduced.
Seite 568 - Weeping at the feet and head, I can see your falling tears, I can hear your sighs and prayers; Yet I smile and whisper this, — "I am not the thing you kiss; Cease your tears, and let it lie; It was mine, it is not I.
Seite 557 - Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Seite 220 - There are many more shining qualities in the mind of man, but there is none so useful as discretion ; it is this indeed which gives a value to all the rest, which sets them at work in their proper times and places, and turns them to the advantage of the person who is possessed of them. Without it, learning is pedantry, and wit impertinence ; virtue itself looks like weakness ; the best parts only qualify a man to be more sprightly in errors, and active to his own prejudice.
Seite 183 - My mind to me a kingdom is ; Such perfect joy therein I find As far exceeds all earthly bliss That God or nature hath assigned ; Though much I want that most would have, Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

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