Records of the Geological Survey of India, Bände 8-10

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Geological Survey of India, 1875
 

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Seite 184 - Hira (diamond) occurs may have reference to some longforgotten discovery. In addition to diamonds, pebbles of Beryl, Topaz, Carbuncle, Amethyst, Cornelian, and clear quartz used to be collected in the Mahanadi ; but I have not seen either sapphires or rubies. It is probable that the matrix of these, or most of them, exists in the metamorphic rocks, and is therefore distinct from that of the diamonds.
Seite 184 - ... eight or nine months, than would be possible in the case of the washings in the bed of the Mahanadi itself. According to the accounts received by me, the southern channel of the Mahanadi used not to be emptied in the Raja's time ; but from various causes I should expect it to yield, proportionately, a larger number of diamonds than the northern.
Seite 182 - Jharas having been at any time worse than it is at present. No doubt the gambling element, which may be said to have been ever present in work of the above nature, commended it to the native mind. According to Mr. Emanuel these people show traces of Negro blood, and hence it has been concluded that they are the " descendants of slaves imported by one of the conquerors of India.
Seite 183 - With regard to the origin of the diamonds, the geological structure of the country leaves but little room for doubt as to the source from whence they are derived. Coincident with their occurrence is that of a group of rocks, which has been shown to be referable to the Vindhyan series, certain members of which series are found in the vicinity of all the known diamond-yielding localities in India, and in the cases of actual rock-workings, are found to constitute the original matrix of the gems.
Seite 182 - Stones," gives some particulars regarding the diamonds of Sambalpur, but the limited information at his disposal does not appear to have been very accurate. He records one diamond of 84 grains having been found within the period of British rule, but does not mention his authority. There are said to be a good many diamonds still in the hands of the wealthier natives in Sambalpur. Of course, large diamonds such as those above mentioned, are of exceptional occurrence ; those ordinarily found are said...
Seite 183 - Raja's operations had been carried on without any original outlay, materially altered the case, and rendered the employment of a considerable amount of capital then, as it would be now, an absolute necessity. Within the past few years statements have gone the round of the Indian papers to the effect that diamonds are now occasionally found by the gold-washers of Sambalpur.
Seite 156 - Catalogue of the publications of the United States Geological Survey of the Territories. FV Hayden, geologist-in-charge.
Seite 182 - Tavernier (vide supra) said 8,000 in his time, — assembled and raised an embankment across the mouth of the northen channel, its share of water being thus deflected into the southern. In the stagnant pools left in the former, sufficient water remained to enable the washers to wash the gravel accumulated between the rocks in their rude wooden trays and cradles. Upon women seems to have fallen the chief burden of the actual washing, while the men collected the stuff. The implements employed and ....
Seite 183 - When Sambalpur was taken over by the British, in 1850, the Government offered to lease out the right to seek for diamonds, and in 1856 a notification appeared in the Gazette describing the prospect in somewhat glowing terms. For a short time the lease was held by a European, at the very low rate of two hundred rupees per annum ; but as it was given up voluntarily, it may be concluded that the lessee did not make it pay. The facts that the Government resumed possession of the rent-free villages, while...
Seite 183 - Sambalpur diamonds, the geological structure of the country leaves but little room for doubt as to the source from whence they are derived. Coincident with their occurrence is that of a group of rocks, which has been shown to be referable to the Vindhyan series, certain members of which series are found in the vicinity of all the known diamond-yielding localities in India, and in the cases of actual rock-workings, are found to include the matrix of the gems.

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