William Shakespeare Not an Impostor

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G. Routledge & Company, 1857 - 122 Seiten
 

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Seite 119 - tis slander, Whose edge is sharper than the sword ; whose tongue Outvenoms all the worms of Nile ; whose breath Rides on the posting winds, and doth belie All corners of the world : kings, queens, and states, Maids, matrons, nay, the secrets of the grave This viperous slander enters.
Seite 1 - Truth may perhaps come to the price of a pearl, that showeth best by day ; but it will not rise to the price of a diamond or carbuncle, that showeth best in varied lights.
Seite 79 - As Plautus and Seneca are accounted the best for comedy and tragedy among the Latines, so Shakespeare among the English is the most excellent in both kinds for the stage...
Seite 96 - ... ordain'd otherwise, and he by death departed from that right, we pray you do not envie his friends the office of their care and paine...
Seite 106 - I remember, the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, Would he had blotted a thousand.
Seite 99 - ... and that he Who casts to write a living line must sweat (Such as thine are) and strike the second heat Upon the Muses...
Seite 91 - EPITAPH. ON THE COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE. UNDERNEATH this sable hearse Lies the subject of all verse, Sidney's sister, Pembroke's mother : Death, ere thou hast slain another, Fair, and learned, and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee.
Seite 94 - ... where [before] you were abus'd with diverse stolne, and surreptitious copies, maimed and deformed by the frauds and stealthes of injurious impostors, that expos' d them : even those, are now offer'd to your view cur'd, and perfect of their limbes ; and all the rest, absolute in their numbers, as he conceived them.
Seite 89 - ... one of the greatest men, and most worthy of admiration that had been in many ages : in his adversity, I ever prayed that God would give him strength, for greatness he could not want...
Seite 103 - What things have we seen Done at the ' Mermaid ? ' Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life.

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