The Familiar Past?: Archaeologies of Later Historical Britain

Cover
Sarah Tarlow, Susie West
Psychology Press, 1999 - 294 Seiten
The Familiar Pastchallenges the popular perception that archaeologists are people who dig up things from the prehistorical or classical world. A survey of material culture from 1500 to the present day, this collection demonstrates how its study can bring a new understanding to what we think of as the known past.

In fourteen case studies, grouped under related topics, the editors draw together current interpretive work explicitly influenced by recent methodological and theoretical developments. Discussion of issues include the origins of modernity in urban contexts, the historical anthropology of food, the social and spatial construction of country houses, the social history of workhouse sites, changes in memorial forms and inscriptions, and the archaeological treatment of gardens.

Im Buch

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

V
15
The familiar past?
17
VI
33
VIII
49
X
65
Familiar spaces
67
XI
85
XIII
101
XIX
179
Familiar spirits
181
XX
197
XXIV
217
XXVIII
233
Old familiar places
235
XXIX
248
XXXI
263

XV
121
Breeding contempt
123
XVI
138
XVII
153
Afterwords across the Atlantic
265
XXXIII
275
XXXV
289
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 49 - I will not cease from Mental Fight, Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand Till we have built Jerusalem In England's green and pleasant Land.
Seite 55 - I hope the people of England will be satisfied!" "I hope my country will do me justice!
Seite 82 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and a king of England too...
Seite 197 - ELEGY IN A COUNTRY CHURCHYARD The men that worked for England They have their graves at home; And bees and birds of England About the cross can roam. But they that fought for England, Following a falling star, Alas, alas, for England They have their graves afar. And they that rule in England In stately conclave met, Alas, alas, for England They have no graves as yet.
Seite 82 - The King as he stood there, majestic in his splendour, was so lifelike that the spectator felt abashed, annihilated in his presence".
Seite 188 - Dear is the spot where Christians sleep, • And sweet the strains that angels pour. O! why should we in anguish weep? They are not lost, but gone before." I am the resurrection and the life." ' From darkness and from woe, A power like lightning darts; A glory cometh down to throw Its shadow o'er our hearts.
Seite 29 - The dialectic of conditions and habitus is the basis of an alchemy which transforms the distribution of capital, the balance-sheet of a power relation, into a system of perceived differences, distinctive properties, that is, a distribution of symbolic capital, legitimate capital, whose objective truth is misrecognized.

Über den Autor (1999)

Sarah Tarlow is Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Wales, Lampeter. Susie West is the Managing Editor of East Anglian Archaeology at the University of East Anglia.

Bibliografische Informationen