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CONTRIBUTORS TO

TO THIS

THIS ISSUE

The Rev. MARTIN J. Scott, S.J.,

is the author of several noteworthy books on Christian fundamentals. Among them are: The Credentials of Christianity, The Hand of God, and God and Myself. The last named book is now in its three hundred thousandth. Father Scott is considered an authority on basic religious questions. He now contributes, as a spokesman for the Roman Catholic Church, the second in The NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW's series of articles by eminent leaders of thought on the relation of the various religions and ethical faiths to the restoration

of the world after the Great War. W. P. M. KENNEDY, M.A., Litt.D.,

has been a member of the Staff in Modern History, University of Toronto, since 1914. He is a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, with highest first class honors. He is a leading authority on sixteenth-century European history and on federal law. His publications include: Studies in Tudor History, Documents of the Canadian Constitution, and The

Nature of Canadian Federalism. JAMES G. RANDALL

received his degree of Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and is now Assistant Professor of History at the University of Illinois. He is a frequent contributor to the technical

journals, and is a close student of modern historical problems. STÈPHANE LAUZANNE,

former member of the French High Commission to the United States, and the accomplished editor-in-chief of

Le Matin, is now a familiar contributor to THE REVIEW. JOHN CORBIN,

essayist, critic, novelist, and dramatist, is a searching student of social evolution. Mr. Corbin's published works include: Which College for the Boy? Iusband, The

Forbidden Guests, and The Edge. E. A. CROSS

is Dean of the Colorado State Teachers College and also Professor of Literature and English. He has published a

volume on The Short Story. HENRY BELLAMANN,

now a resident of South Carolina, is both musician and poet. A volume of verse under his name was published in 1920.

MARJORIE MEEKER

is a native of Bradford, England, but has lived in the United States for some years. She was formerly a student at Bryn

Mawr College, and is now engaged in literary work. WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY,

whose Night Off Gallipoli, published in The Review, attracted

admiring notice, is contributing to numerous periodicals. HORACE HOWARD FURNESS, JR.,

the distinguished Shakespearean scholar, as his father before him, has devoted most of his time to editing the historical plays. The King John of the Variorum Edition appeared

in 1919. STANLEY ALDEN

is Associate Professor of English at Smith College. He

now makes his first contribution to THE REVIEW. ALEXANDER WOOLLCOTT,

the well-known dramatic critic of The New York Times,

offers some hints to those who would become actors. ANNE C. E. ALLINSON,

formerly Dean of Women at Brown University, is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College, where she received her degree of Doctor of Philosophy. To students of Hellenism her Greek Lands and Letters, written in collaboration with her husband, is a familiar and companionable volume. The first of the two papers entitled Paul and Two Women appeared in

the August issue. MRS. SCHUYLER VAN RENSSELAER,

a frequent contributor to The REVIEW, has published English
Cathedrals, Art Out-of-Doors, History of New York in the Seven-
teenth Century, One Man Who Was Content, and a volume of

Poems.
MARY VIDA CLARK

was, for several years, Executive Secretary of The Women's
Prison Association and formerly Assistant Secretary of the
State Charities Aid Association. Miss Clark has contributed
many articles to the technical as well as the literary

magazines. STANLEY T. WILLIAMS

is now Assistant Professor of English in Yale College, where he was graduated in 1911, and where, in 1915, he received his degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The present article concludes the series of four papers.

CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE

JOSEPH SILVERMAN

was ordained rabbi in 1884, and came to New York as minister of Temple Emanu-El in 1888, the charge he still holds. He has been president of numerous important Jewish organizations and was founder of the Emanu-El Brotherhood. He is the author of Catechism on Judaism, and corresponding editor of The Jewish Encyclopædia, and an authoritative writer on Hebrew subjects. His article in this number of THE REVIEW is the first of a series on World Restoration by eminent leaders of thought.

DAVID JAYNE HILL

is among the foremost authorities upon international law. His writings include A History of European Diplomacy, Impressions of the Kaiser, and American World Policies.

WILLIAM HOWARD GARDINER

is known in naval circles, abroad as well as here, as an unusually well-informed student of naval policy in its relation to past and present statecraft. Formerly a consulting engineer, he is now Vice-President of the Navy League of the United States, Secretary of the Naval History Society, member of the United States Naval Institute, and a writer whose opinions receive careful consideration.

JOHN CORBIN,

essayist, critic, novelist, and dramatist, is a searching student of social evolution. Mr. Corbin's published works include: Which College for the Boy?, Thusband, The Forbidden Guests, and The Edge.

JOSEPH COLLINS,

the eminent neurologist, is the author of Diseases of the Brain, The Way with the Nerves, Sleep and the Sleepless, and Jy Italian Year.

WAYNE B. WHEELER

is a graduate of Oberlin, and in 1919 received his LL.D. degree from his Alma Mater. He is General Counsel and Secretary of the Legislative Committee of the Anti-Saloon League of America, and author of The Federal and State Laws Relating to the Liquor Traffic.

MALCOLM COWLEY,

a recent graduate of Harvard University, is now studying in

France. He makes his first appearance in The REVIEW. JOSEPH ANDREW GALAHAD,

the young soldier-poet, who died in April of this year, won merited praise for his verse. The Knife, which THE REVIEW published, brought him recognition on both sides of the Atlantic.

ARCHIBALD MACLEISH,

one of the younger poets, has already published a volume of verse.

His prose, too, is to be found in numerous periodicals. BEATRICE RAVENEL,

a poet of the South, studied for some time at Radcliffe

College. She is a native of Charleston, South Carolina. ANNE C. E. ALLINSON,

formerly Dean of Women at Brown University, is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College, where she received her degree of Doctor of Philosophy. To students of Hellenism her Greek Land and Letters, written in collaboration with her husband,

is a familiar and companionable volume. EDWARD A. THURBER

is a graduate of Yale University, but received his Master's

degree from Harvard. MARTIN ARMSTRONG,

one of the group of the Young Poets in England, is essayist

as well, and a familiar contributor to English periodicals. JOHN ARCHIBALD MacCallum

has been minister of the Walnut Street Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, for the past twelve years. He is a graduate of Union Theological Seminary, New York, and has written much

on religious and ethical subjects. STANLEY T. WILLIAMS

is now Assistant Professor of English in Yale College, where he was graduated in 1911, and where, in 1915, he received his degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The present article is the third

of a series of four papers which The REVIEW is publishing. RICHARD ALDINGTON

holds a high place in the group of exponents of the New Poetry in England and has secured the same recognition here. He is essayist as well.

CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS NUMBER

Right HONORABLE SIR GEORGE E. FOSTER

has been Minister of Trade and Commerce and also Minister of Finance under several Governments in Canada. He was Canadian representative at the Peace Conference at Paris and later Vice-President of the League of Nations. Sir George is a Liberal Conservative in politics and has always been a strong supporter of adequate protection for Canadian industries.

JOSEPH CONRAD FEHR,

Special Assistant to the Attorney-General in the Department of Justice at Washington, enjoys two professions-Law and Journalism.

PHILIP MARSHALL BROWN

is Professor of International Law at Princeton University. Since his graduation from Williams College he has also been in the diplomatic service, having been Secretary of the American Legation at Constantinople, and Minister to Honduras.

STUART H. PERRY

is a Member of the Michigan Community Council Commission and Industrial Relations Commission, and since 1921 a Vice-President of the Associated Press. During the war he was Director of the Michigan State Bureau of Military Relief at New York.

IRVING BACHELLER,

a native of Pierrepont, New York, has peculiar affection for and appreciation of the background secured to the men of the North Woods. The present essay is a picture of a citizen of these woods in the making. Mr. Bacheller's many volumes count among the more recent The Light in the Clearing and A Man for the Ages.

MURIEL HARRIS

is connected with The Manchester Guardian. For ten years she has been art critic of Truth. Miss Harris is now in Paris.

ANNE GOODWIN WINSLOW

(Mrs. E. E. Winslow) is already known to the readers of THE REVIEW.

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