Democritus in London: With the Mad Pranks and Comical Conceits of Motley and Robin Good-fellow, to which are Added Notes Festivous, Etc

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W. Pickering, 1852 - 312 Seiten
 

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Seite 76 - I do love these ancient ruins. We never tread upon them but we set Our foot upon some reverend history ; And, questionless, here in this open court, Which now lies naked to the injuries Of stormy weather, some men lie...
Seite 297 - Tis a very good world to live in, To lend or to spend or to give in, But to beg or to borrow or get a man's own, 'Tis the very worst world that ever was known.
Seite 235 - London, to thee I do present the merry month of May; Let each true subject be content to hear me what I say: For from the top of conduit-head, as plainly may appear, I will both tell my name to you, and wherefore I came here. My name is Ralph, by due descent though not ignoble I, Yet far inferior to the flock of gracious grocery...
Seite 32 - What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difficulty is to choose or to reject ; to run them into verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose.
Seite 290 - Of every hearer; for it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours.
Seite 32 - I think myself as vigorous as ever in the faculties of my soul, excepting only my memory, which is not impaired to any great degree; and if I lose not more of it, I have no great reason to complain. What...
Seite 35 - Lives of great men all remind us We may make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time ; Footprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, may take heart again.
Seite 32 - Spenser more than once insinuates that the soul of Chaucer was transfused into his body, and that he was begotten by him two hundred years after his decease.
Seite 210 - Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low, — an excellent thing in woman.

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