Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

TABLE erhibiting the TONNAGE of OLD STAVES, of Leagers, Butts, Puncheons, Hogsheads, Barrels, and HalfHogsheads.

[blocks in formation]

Puncheon 00 Staves.

[blocks in formation]

Ilalf-hhd.
Staves.

[blocks in formation]

10 - Staves.

Punchs.

[ocr errors]

}

1

401

[ocr errors][merged small]

42

[ocr errors]

37

63

501

1.
1

3
2
1.}
1
2.1
2 1
1}

1

[blocks in formation]

1

5 7

10 13 17 equal to 7 9 11 13 17 23 10

13 1 16 20 25 31 12 1 16 19 | 23

30 14 | 18 22 27 34 46 15 | 20 24 30 33 | 51 17 22 27 33

57 19 | 24 30

47 | 20 26 32 40

65 22 | 29 35 43 53 71 24 30 38 47 59 80 23 33 40 50 63 85 27 31 43 | 53 67 91 29 | 37

46 57 30 | 39 48 60 1 75 | 102 32 / 41 51 63 79 108

43 53 67 S4 111 33 43 57 70

88 119 48 60 73 92 | 125 39 50 63 | 77 97 | 131 40 52 66 80 102 136 SO 104 132 160 204 272 120 156

198 210 306 408 160 208 261

320 408 511 200 260

330 400 510 680 210 312 396 450 | 612 816 250 361 426 560 714

932 320

410 528 | 610 816 | 1088 390 | 468 594 1 720 918 1221 100 520 660 SOO

1020 1360

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

CORDAGE TABLES; showing how many Fathoms, feet, and

Inches, of a Rope of any Size, not erceeding Fourteen Inches, make a Hundred Weight; with the Use of the Table.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

At the top of the table, marked inches, fathoms, feet, inches, the first column is the thickness of a rope in inches and quarters; the other three, the fathoms, feet, and inches, that make up a hundred weight of such a rope. One example will make it plain :

Suppose it is required how much of a 7-inch rope will make a hundred weight? Find 7, in the first column, under inches, or thickness of the rope, and, against it, in the other columns, you will find 9 56; which shows that, in a rope of seven inches, there will be 9 fathoms, 5 feet, 6 inches, required to make one hundred weight.

The Weight of any CABLE or ROPE, of 120 Fathoms in

Length, and for every half-inch, from 3 Inches to 24 in Circumference.

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The Use of the Table.—The first column, marked for inches, is the thickness or circumference of the cable to every { inch, from 3 to 24. The second, marked cwt. qrs. for hundred weights and quarters that it will weigh, if 120 fathoms long.

As, for instance, suppose it be a cable of 14 inches and a }; look against 14), and you will find in the other column 52 cwt. 2 qrs, which shows that 120 fathoms of 14} inch cable will weigh 52 cwt. 2 qrs. ; and so in others. And any quantity of less length will weigh in proportion.

Cables, of what thickness soever, are generally formed of three ropes twisted together, which are then called strands ; each of these is composed of three smaller strands, and those last of a certain number of rope-yarns: this number is therefore greater or smaller in pro portion to the size of the cable required.

All cables ought to be 120 fathoms in length; for which purpose, the threads or yarns must be 180 fathoms, inasmuch as they are diminished one-third in length by twisting.

The number of threads also of which each cable is composed being always proportioned to its length and thickness, the weight and value of it are determined by this number.—Thus a cable of 10 inches in circumference ought to consist of 485 threads, and weigh 1940 lbs. and on this foundation is calculated the following table.

A TABLE of the NUMBER of THREADS and WEIGHT

of CABLES of different Circumferences.

Inches in Circumf.

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

[blocks in formation]

18

19 20

TABLE showing the Comparative strength of COMMON and

PATENT CORDAGE.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][subsumed][merged small]

The preceding table is deduced from experiments made by the breaking of ropes of various sizes, with one of their ends attached to a frame suspended to a strong iron beam, moving on steel pivots; to the other end of which beam weights were progressively suspended until the ropes broke. By these means the patent shroud-laid ropes, made of Petersburgh clean hemp, were found almost uniformly to break with a stress fluctuating between 6 and 71 cwt. per inch of their girt, in inches squared; thus a patent rope of 5 inches girt would, on an average, require 175 cwt. to break it. Common made ropes of the same hemp, and of 25 threads in each strand, broke with 5 cwt. per inch, and kept a progressive decrease, so as with about 130 threads to fall off to 4 cwt. per inch. The threads were of the common size; and the latter rope rather exceeded 8 inches girt. When strands were broken separately, the disparity between those of the common and the improved methods was much greater than in the ropes themselves. These experiments being made in the manner before stated, no deduction from the strength given has to be made for friction, which otherwise would have been requisite.

The duration of patent ropes in drawing coals, &c. from mines, or for other purposes where they are subject to be worn, is still greater than their superiority of strength over common rope; because, when the outside shell or coat of yarns of the latter is much worn, the whole of it gives way; the rope then lengthens suitably to the next coat, loses its form, and becomes unfit for use.

Whale lines are generally of 24 inches girt and 28 threads to the strand, and made from finely dressed hemp of the best quality; these lines have been found to break under resistances of between 25 and 32 cwt., equal to between 5 and 6 cwt. per inch rope ; whilst lines made from the same yarns, patent laid, and only 2 inches girt, have carried considerably above two tons; so that the latter are much stronger and lighter, and of course worthy of general preference.

The WEIGHT of each PIECE or BOLT of BRITISH SAIL

CLOTH, as required by Law; the Length being 38 Yards and
Breadth 24 Inches.
Double Threads.

Single Threads.
No. 1 to weigh
441b. No. 7 to weigh

241b. 2

41
8

21 3

38
9

18 4

35
10

15 5

32 6

29

=

[ocr errors]

PROPORTIONS of one SPECIES of PROVISIONS to another,

as allowed by Government. 1 lb, of bread....

equal to 1 lb. of flour. 1 lb. of sugar, or 1 lb. of butter 2 lb. of cheese, or 2 lb. of rice. 1 lb. or a pint of rice

or lb. of butter. 1 gallon of oatmeal

2 lb. of butter, or 4 lb. of rice. 2 lb. of pork

3 lb. of beef.
And rice versa. The above are the only useful and proper substitutes.
I quart of calavances ......... = I qrt. of peas, or 3 pints oatmeal.
Where turtle is issued, the proportion is 2lb. of turtle to llb. of beef.

In case of issuing stock fish,
4 lb. are computed equal to 1 gallon of oatmeal.
2 lb. yams...

1 lb. bread.
1 lb, wheat

do.
I gallon of wheat.... 1 gallon oatmeal.

I quarter of wheat 336 lb. bread.
I qr. of malt with 10 lb. hops .. 1 ton of beer.

Cocoa in the West Indies, when issued for butter, pound for pound. When there appears, on passing a transport's account, any debt in this article, the Victualling Board have generally charged 3s. per Ib.

=

« ZurückWeiter »