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RESOLUTIONS.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Columbus, Ohio, Feb. 26, 1833. } SIR,

I have the honor to transmit the accompanying preamble and resolutions, passed by the General Assembly of Ohio, on the 25th inst, to wit: a preamble and resolutions on the subject of the South Carolina Ordinance: a resolution in relation to the call of a Convention to amend the Constitution of the United States; and a resolution relating to the President's proclamation and message.

I have the honor to be,
Very respectfully,
Your obd't. serv't.

ROBERT LUCAS. To his Excellency,

the Governor of New-York.

Preamble and Resolutions on the subject of the

South Carolina Ordinance.

Whereas His Excellency the Governor has transmitted to this General Assembly the Ordinance of the late Convention of the people of South Carolina, together with the proceedings of that body, whose object appears to be a resistance to the collection of duties, imposts, &c. upon foreign commodities imported into that State, by nullifying the acts of Congress, providing for the levying and collecting such duties. And this General Assembly cannot but view, with the deepest regret, the avowed determination of a majority of the citizens of the State of South Carolina, to resist the operation of the laws of the General Government, in the manner pointed out by the Ordinance adopted by their late Convention; and we have no doubt that such a course, if persisted in, must inevitably lead to consequences the most disastrous, and ruinous to the peace, prosperity and happiness of our common country.

Being connected, as we are, with our brethren of South Carolina by the strongest ties of consanguinity, and endeared by the mutual reciprocity of friendly intercourse and national attachment, and being sensible of the importance of our connection as States belonging to the same Federal Union; we cannot but deprecate every

effort or measure which is calculated, in the remotest degree, to operate to the severance of any of those ties, or render doubtful the permanent existence of our Confederacy. And entertaining as we do the most implicit confidence in the wisdom, justice and integrity of the General Government, we are well persuaded that no partial evil would be permitted to exist in any particular section of the Union, should it not be apparent that such evil was fully overbalanced by a general benefit afforded, by the same policy out of which that evil was found to spring up. Such evils, if such exist, we should endeavor to remedy in a spirit of moderation and good faith; to the end that the unparalleled prosperity of the whole Union, unequalled as it is, in the history of civilized man, may not be intercepted or paralized in any of its parts.

Believing that the prosperity and independence of this Republic mainly depend upon the general peace and harmony which ought to exist among the several States, and that all should ever keep in view the adopted maxim, “united we stand, divided we fall;" wę feel it a duty, therefore, as American citizens, to cling with pertinacity to the Constitution of the United States, and to the

preservation of the Union of the States. We cannot, therefore, view with indifference, much less can we lend our aid to any measure which is calculated to disturb the integrity of that Union.

Resolved, therefore, by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That we view with the deepest regret the unhappy movements, and apparent determination of the late Convention of the people of South Carolina, to nullify the laws of the General Government, made in conformity to the Constitution of the United States.

Resolved, That the Federal Union exists in a solemn compact entered into by the voluntary consent of the people of the United States, and of cach and every State, and that therefore, no State can claim the right to secede from, or violate that compact, and however grievous may be the supposed or real burthens of a State, the only legitimate remedy is in the wise and faithful exercise of the elective franchise, and the solemn responsibility of the public agents.

Resolved, That the doctrine, that a State has the power to nullify, a law of the General Government, is revolutionary in its character, and is in its nature calculated to overthrow the great temple of American liberty. Such a course cannot absolve that allegiance which the people of this Union owe to the supremacy of the laws.

Resolved, That in levying and collecting duties, imposts and excises, whilst the general good should be the primary object: a special regard ought to be had to the end, that the interest and prosperity of every section of the country should be equally consulted and its burthens proportionably distributed.

Resolved, That the first object of the American people, should be, to cherish the most ardent attachment to the Constitution and Laws of this Union; and as a first and paramount object of a free people, we should use every honorable means to preserve the honor and integrity of the Union.

woed, That ihamble and cutives of ine T. DISNE

Resolved, That the Governor be requested to transmit copies of [the] foregoing preamble and resolutions to the President of the United States, and to the Executives of the several States.

DAVID T. DISNEY,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.

SAMUEL R. MILLER,

Speaker of the Senate. FEBRUARY 25, 1833.

Resolution in relation to a call of a Convention to

amend the Constitution of the United States.

Resolved, by the General Assembly of the State of Onio, That in the opinion of this General Assembly it is inexpedient at the present time to apply to the Congress of the United States, for a call of a Convention of the people to amend the Constitution of the United States, or to call a Convention of the States to consider and define questions of disputed powers which may have arisen between any State of this Confederacy and the General Government.

Resolved further, That His Excellency, the Governor, be, and he is hereby requested to transmit copies of the foregoing resolution to each of the Executives of the several States of this Union for the consideration of the Legislatures thereof. •

DAVID T. DISNEY,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,

SAMUEL R. MILLER,

Speaker of the Senate, FEBRUARY 25, 1833.

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Resolution relating to the President's Proclamation

and Message.

Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That this Legislature do cordially approve of the exposition of the prin ciples of the Constitution of the United States, touching the pernicious doctrines of nullification and secession set forth in the proclamation of the President of the United States, of the tenth of December last, and in his late message to Congress, and that this Legislature do also feel the strongest assurance that the principles contained in that exposition will be firmly sustained by the people of Ohio.

Resolved, That the Governor be requested to forward a copy of the foregoing resolution to the President of the United States, to

the Executive of each of the United States, and to each of our Senators and Representatives in Congress.

DAVID T. DISNEY, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

SAMUEL R. MILLER,

Speaker of the Senate. FEBRUARY 25, 1833.

SECRETARY OF STATE'S OFFICE,

Columbus, Ohio, Feb. 25, 1833. I HEREBY certify, That the foregoing Resolutions are true copies of the original rolls now on file in this Office.

MOSES H. KIRBY, Secretary of State.

SECRETUMBUS, OROSTATE, 1852FICE, }

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PRINTED BY E. CROSWELL, PRINTER TO THE STATE.

1833.

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