A Dramatic Synopsis: Containing an Essay on the Political and Moral Use of a Theatre; Involving Remarks on the Dramatic Writers of the Present Day, and Strictures on the Performers of the Two Theatres

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Lackington, Allen, and Company; Symonds; Jordan and Maxwell, 1804 - 146 Seiten
 

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Seite 45 - I have often observed that, on mimicking the looks and gestures of angry, or placid, or frighted, or daring men, I have involuntarily found my mind turned to that passion whose appearance I endeavoured to imitate...
Seite 124 - Pity it is, that the momentary beauties flowing from an harmonious elocution, cannot like those of poetry be their own record! That the animated graces of the player can live no longer than the instant breath and motion that presents them; or at best can but faintly glimmer through the memory, or imperfect attestation of a few surviving spectators.
Seite 45 - When he had a mind to penetrate into the inclinations of those he had to deal with, he composed his face, his gesture, and his whole body, as nearly as he could, into the exact similitude of the person he intended to examine ; and then carefully observed what turn of mind he seemed to acquire by this change. So that, says my author, he was able to enter into the dispositions and thoughts of people as effectually as if he had been changed into the very men.
Seite 119 - ... their faces are wrinkled, their eyes purging thick amber and plum-tree gum, and that they have a plentiful lack of wit, together with most weak hams : all...
Seite 129 - A ruffian, murderer, a base assassin ! And all to please a false ungrateful woman. Henceforward let the laws of nations cease ; And let the pale that severs right and wrong, Things sacred and profane, be broken down ; Gods in their temples, kings upon their thrones, Are not in safety, while Orestes lives. Oh, never more shall my torn mind be heal'd, Nor taste the gentle comforts of repose ! A dreadful band of gloomy cares surround me.
Seite 121 - That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please. Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart, As I do thee.
Seite 45 - tis a bold pretence To judgment, breeding, wit, and eloquence : Nay more ; for they muft look within, to find Thofe fecret turns of nature in the mind : Without this part, in vain would be the whole, And but a body all, without a foul.
Seite 102 - There's fennel for you, and columbines; there's rue for you; and here's some for me; we may call it herb of grace o' Sundays. O, you must wear your rue with a difference. There's a daisy; I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died.
Seite 45 - This man, it seems, had not only made very accurate observations on human faces, but was very expert in mimicking such as were in any way remarkable. When he had a mind to penetrate into the inclinations of those he had to deal with, he composed his face, his gesture and his whole body, as nearly as he could, into the exact similitude of the person he intended to examine ; and then carefully...
Seite 45 - Campanella. This man, it seems, had not only made very accurate observations on human faces, but was very expert in mimicking such as were any way remarkable. When he had a mind to penetrate into the inclinations of those he had to deal with, he composed his face, his gesture, and his whole body, as nearly as...

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