The Beauties of Wiltshire: Displayed in Statistical, Historical, and Descriptive Sketches: Interspersed with Anecdotes of the Arts, Band 1

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J.D. Dewick, 1801
 

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Seite 232 - Permit me, sire, further to observe, that whoever has already dared, or shall hereafter endeavour, by false insinuations and suggestions, to alienate your Majesty's affections from your loyal subjects in general, and from the City of London in particular, and to withdraw your confidence...
Seite 232 - We do, therefore, with the greatest humility and submission, most earnestly supplicate your Majesty, that you will not dismiss us from your presence, without expressing a more favourable opinion of your faithful citizens, and without some comfort, without some prospect at least of redress.
Seite 214 - Its living hues where the warm pencil pours, And breathing forms from the rude marble start, How to life's humbler scene can I depart ? My breast all glowing from those gorgeous...
Seite 232 - Majesty's person and family, or more ready to sacrifice their lives and fortunes in the maintenance of the true honour and dignity of your crown. We do therefore, with the greatest humility and submission, most earnestly supplicate your Majesty that you will not dismiss us from your presence without expressing a more...
Seite 215 - In my low cell how cheat the sullen hours ? Vain the complaint ! For Fancy can impart (To Fate superior, and to Fortune's doom) Whate'er adorns the stately-storied hall : She, 'mid the dungeon's solitary gloom, Can dress the Graces in their Attic pall, Bid the green landscape's vernal beauty bloom, And in bright trophies clothe the twilight wall.
Seite 302 - You, my dear brother! you live in a hovel ! You are a man ; you are an honour to the family. I am nothing. You shall take this house and the estate, and I will be your guest, if you please.
Seite 231 - I should have been wanting to the public, as well as to myself, if I had not expressed my dissatisfaction at the late address. My sentiments on that subject continue the same; and I should ill deserve to be considered as the Father of my people, if I...
Seite 310 - Why will the great, who can have no interest but in the glory of their country, why will they suffer any dirty, whispering medium to interfere between them and such characters as Mr. Hussey, who appears to have been no less amiable as a man, than he was admirable as an artist ? " The public are likely never to know the whole of what they have lost in Mr. Hussey.
Seite 231 - No sooner had the King heard this than, facing Beckford in a way to show his natural obstinacy, he read the following answer :— " I should have been wanting to the public, as well as to myself, if I had not expressed my dissatisfaction at the late address. My sentiments on that subject continue the same; and I should ill deserve to be considered as the Father of my people, if I should suffer myself to be prevailed upon to make such an use of my prerogative as I cannot but think inconsistent with...
Seite 96 - That the influence of the Crown had increased, was increasing, and ought to be diminished:

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