Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

ENGLISH POET.

the owner's country seat, Kelmscott Manor. The name was also given to Mr. Morris's town house, in Hammersmith, on the bank of the Thames.

Mr. Morris was brusque in manner, but kind, generous, and largehearted. He was a man of burly figure, and usually dressed in blue serge, which gave him somewhat the appearance of a bluff sea captain. He was full of nervous energy, to which, when engaged in a discus. sion, he used to give vent by striding up and down his long room and waving his arms to add emphasis to bis speech. This room was a

wonder in itself, filled as it was with all the art treasures that money could procure and good taste could suggest. He lived in a big, red, old-fashioned house in the Mall, Ham. mersmith, overlooking the Thames, with an old-fashioned garden around it, full of roses in summertime. In this house on Sunday evenings he would have frequent socialist meetings. Mr. Morris was mentioned for the poet laureateship after Lord Tennyson's death, but his political views made his selec. tion for that post impossible.

All the English papers unite in speak. ing of Mr. Morris in most gracious terms.

Says the London Times: COVENTRY PATŅORE,

"A poet,and one of our half dozen best poets, even when Tennyson and Browning were alive;

an artist whose influence is visible almost everywhere; a craftsman who devoted himself, in a commercial age, to the union of arts and crafts, it may be said of him, with little or no exaggeration, that he adorned all that he touched.

Enlarging on whatever Mr. Ruskin has said of the nobility of honest work, Morris held not only that executive handicraft was within the province of an artist, but that all crafts demanded artistic treatment. There can be no doubt of the hopefulness with which Morris taught and followed his opinions. If they led him, as they have led other generous men, towards socialism, the world can afford to judge hiin indulgently, as not apprehending much danger from

his rhetoric. The unpractical extremes to which his opinions tended are only the results of a warm heart and a mistaken enthusiasm. It is to be feared that his ideals and aspirations for art will never approach realization. Our national nature, and the inevitable laws of economy, will not yield to persuasion, or promises, or dreams."

The following observations on the work and influence of Mr. Morris, present a clear statement of the guiding principle of his life, as well as a seemingly fair estimate of the effects that are traceable to his influence:

"Morris was a socialist in the sense in which Ruskin was one. He believed that the condition of the world would be greatly improved if the masses were fused with the classes and influenced by a love of the beautiful in art and by a greater degree of material comfort in daily life than is now shared. Convinced that so long as there was individual ownership of land and capital there must be antagonism between a superior and an inferior class, he accepted the socialist generalization that all the means of production must be nationalized, and every one enabled to claim useful employment and compelled to render service to the community. *

[graphic]

*

* *

*

"A socialist of the Ruskin type he remained until the end of his days, but experience taught him that the professional agitators with whom he had been associated were incapable of creating a new social order or of leading a revolution. His march to Trafalgar Square in 1887 was his last active service with the proletariat. He did not retreat from the socialist ground which he had oocupied for years; but he changed his tactics, abandoned propagandist work in the streets, and restricted his activities to the Hammersmith Society, which met at his own house.

"What remains true of this craftsman of genius, is that while he dreamed

* 本

pind

his dreams of Utopia in which there was a common stock of property and a new vitalizing power in social equality, he dignified and adorned every art which he took up. and taught workmen of every trade to respect work for its own sake and to make it as true, honest, and perfect as possible. That is the real lesson of his eventful life, filled as it has been with useful activities and helpful sympathies; and possibly it will have a wider reach among his fellowcraftsman in consequence of his political adventures and the sacrifices which they entailed. From that point of view it may not have been wholly in vain that he preached Henry George's principles on street corners, or headed mobs toward Westminster Abbey or Nelson's Column, himself singing as wildly as any French revolutionist the Marseillaise."

PATMORE, COVENTRY KEARSEY DEIGHTON, English poet; born in 1823; died at Lymington, Eng., Nov. 26. He wrote Tamerton Church Tower, and Other Poems, published in 1853; an elaborate domestic poem, The Angel in the House (1854–62); and a selection entitled The Children's Garland (1862); The Unknown Eros (1877); a memoir of Barry Cornwall and Amelia, etc. (1878). Mr. Patmore's strictly critical writings are mainly to be found in his Principle in Art (1889); but Religio Poetæ (1893) and The Rod, the Root, and the Flower (1895); though professedly rather ethical or religious than æsthetic, abound with critical remarks.

RICHARDS, SIR FREDERICK, British admiral; born in 1833; died at Bath, Eng., Nov. 16. Entered the navy in 1848, became commander in 1860, captain in 1866, rear-admiral in 1882, vice-admiral in 1888, and admiral in 1893. He served as commodore commanding the Cape of Good Hope and West Coast of Africa station from 1879 to 1882; in the Zulu war in 1879; in the Transvaal campaign, 1880–1, and Burmah war, 1885; was aide-de-camp to Her Majesty the Queen, 1879–82; commander-in-chief of the East India station, 1885–8; China station, 1880-5; a lord of the admiralty, 1882–5, and again from 1892.

RICHARDSON, SIR BENJAMIN WARD, English physician and author; born in Somerby, Leicestershire, Eng., Oct. 31, 1828; died Nov. 21. In 1866 he discovered the use of the ether spray for local anesthesia in surgical operations, and also introduced methylene bichloride as a general anæsthetic, and the use of nitrite of amyl in tetanus. He founded and edited for some years The Journal of Public Health, and afterward The Social Science Review, contributing many papers in the line of exploiting the experimental method as a means of advancing the medical profession. He invented the “lethal chamber,” for the painless killing of animals. The subject that brought Dr. Richardson before the largest public, however, and attracted the most widespread interest to bis work, was his investigation into hygiene, especially the effect of alcohol on the human system, and his prominence as a supporter of total abstinence. His latest researches were directed to the study of the diseases incident to modern civilization. Between 1884 and 1892 he published quarterly The Asclepiad, a book of original research and observation on the science, art, and literature of medicine, preventive and curative, all the work being from his own pen. He also published volumes in the field of general literature-The Son of a Star: A Romonce of the Second Century; and Thomas Sopurith, a Biography.

Dr. Richardson was president of the Medical Society of London, and was thirty-two times elected president of the St. Andrew's Medical Graduates' Association, and was honorary physician to the Royal Literary Fund, the Newspaper Press Fund, and the National Society of Schoolmasters; and in his long and distinguished career had received many honors from foreign scientific societies. The University of St. Andrews conferred the degree of LL.D. on him in 1877. He was knighted in 1893.

SALVINI, ALEXANDER, actor; born in Rome, Italy, Dec. 21, 1861, son of the Italian tragedian, Tomasso Salvini; died in Florence, Italy, Dec. 15. He was intended for the engineering profession, and came to America in 1881 with that end in view, but followed his natural bent and became an actor. He played with Clara Morris and Margaret Mather, but joined his father's company on his coming to this country in 1885. He won greatest favor at the Madison Square theatre, New York city, as Launcelot in Elaine and Henry Borgfeldt in The Partners. After his father's return to Europe, the son “starred" in this country, prospering greatly, especially at points away from New York. His plays were Don Cæsar de Bazan, The Duke's Motto, A Celebrated Case, Monte Cristo, A Child of Naples, Cavalleria Rusticana, L'Ami Fritz, The Three Guardsmen, Zamar, The Student of Salamanca, and Hamlet.

Sassoon, SIR ALBERT ABDULLAH DAVID, Bart., K. C. S. I.; born at Bagdad in 1817, son of David Sassoon of Bombay, India; died in Brighton, Eng., Oct. 24. He was a merchant and banker in Bombay, and member of the Bombay legislative council 1866–72; founded a hospital, high school, and mechanics' institute in Bombay, for which the freedom of the city of London was presented to him in 1873. He was made a C. S. I. in 1866; was knighted in 1872; and was made a baronet in 1890. He was chief of the Mesopotamian Jews, and was known as Nassi or Prince of the Captivity.

SCOTT-SIDDONS, Mrs. MARY FRANCES, actress and reader; born in India in 1848, died in Paris, France, Nov. 19. She was great granddaughter of the famous English actress Sarah Siddons. Her husband, Mr. Scott, was an officer of the British navy. She began giving readings in London, Eng., about 1868, and her first appearance as an actress was at the Haymarket theatre there shortly afterwards as Rosalind in As You Like It. Her success in America was established under the management of Augustin Daly. She travelled extensively in this country, Europe, and Australia.

TISSERAND, FRANÇOIS FÉLIX, well known French astronomer, director of the Paris Observatory since 1892; born Jan. 15, 1845; died Oct. 20.

TROCHU, GENERAL Louis JULES, French military officer; born in Brittany Mar. 12, 1815; died Oct. 7. Educated at St. Cyr, he entered the army in 1837, reaching the rank of lieutenant-colonel in 1853. For services in the Crimean war he was made a general of division; served in the Italian campaign of 1859; was assigned to duty at the ministry of war, and awarded the grand cross of the Legion of Honor. During the war with Germany in 1870–1 he gained his greatest prominence as governor of Paris and commander-in-chief of the forces for defense of that city during the critical times of the siege after the battle of Sedan. He was elected member of the national assembly in 1871, and retired in 1873. He was the author of an Orleanist work entitled The French Army, and wrote a defense of his own administration under the title For Truth and Justice.

WÜRTEMBERG, WILLIAM NICHOLAS, DUKE OF, died on his estate in the Tyrol Nov. 6, aged 68.

PUBLISHED BY GARRETSON, COX & CO.

BUFFALO, N. Y.
ALFRED S. JOHNSON, A.M., PH.D.--EDITOR.

Table of Contents.

64
66

[ocr errors]

60

FRONTISPIECE.

PAGE.
PROFESSOR WILHELM KONRAD RÖNTGEN, accompanying article on "The
Discovery of X Rays".
LEADING TOPICS OF THE QUARTER.
PAGE. .

PAGE.

The Venezuelan Controversy.

18 Present Outlook in the Trans-

The Boundary Commission. 19 vaal...

British Case Presented

21 The Matabele Uprising.

Venezuelan Case Presented.. 26 Abyssinia and the Soudan.

68
Public Opinion in the United Italian Defeat at Adowa.

68

States....

28 English Expedition to the Sou-

Public Opinion in Great Britain 82 dan...

75
Plans of Settlement Proposed.. 33 The Armenian Question..

78
The Yuruan Incident...

Enforced Conversions.

79
The Cuban Revolt......
85 Surrender of Zeitoun.

80

General Campos Retired from

The Massacres (ontinued. 81

Command..
37 The Red Cross Mission.

82

Military Situation and Opera-

Russo-Turkish Secret Treaty. 84

tions...
401 Armenia in Congress..

85

Cuban Expeditions from the Lord Salisbury on Armenia. 87

States

43 Armenia in the British Parlia-

Congressional Proceedings.. 45 ment........

87
Crisis in the Transvaal.

The Porte's Reliance.

88

History of the Transvaal. 51 Crisis in the Salvation Army... 89

The Uitlander Agitation.
52 History of the Army.....

90
Dr. Jameson's Raid.

Causes of the Crisis.

93

The Anglo-German Crisis.. 61 The American Volunteers.. 96

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS.

The Bering Sea Dispute....

97 The Partition of Siam....

106

General European Situation. 98 The Partition of Africa

108

A Russo-Turkish Alliance. 101 The Ashanti Expedition. 108

Conversion of Prince Boris. 102

Madagascar Annexed by France 111

The Far Eastern Situation.

103 Anglo-French Boundaries.. 112

Russo-Chinese Relations.. 103 Other International Affairs..

113
Revolt in Korea..
101 The Trinidad Dispute....

113
Formosa Opened to Commerce. 106 Miscellaneous...

114
AFFAIRS IN AMERICA.
United States Politics...

115)

Property of the Mormon
Free-Silver Agitation.

116
Church..

126

The Fifty-fourth Congress....

119 Income Tax Returns to be De-

Free-Silver Debate.

119
stroyed.

127

Tariff Revision Checked. 121

Other Measures.

127

Appropriations....

Measures Still Pending.

127

New Laws Enacted..

123 Business and Industry.

128

Prize Fighting Prohibited.. 123 The Bond Sale.

180
Alaska Boundary Commis- Tariff and Reciprocity.

131

sion.....

124 Public Accounts....

133

Daughters of the American The Public Debt.

183

Revolution Incorporated.... 124 Receipts and Expenditures. 133

World's Fair Awards.. 121 Monetary Circulation..

134

Seed Distribution Continued. 125 The Army....

184

Proof of Death in Pension The Navy..

135

Cases..

125 Additions to the Navy.

185

Annulment of Land Patents.. 126 Dynamite Guns..

136

Uniform Census Returns..... 126 Oiher Naval Matters..

186

Confederate Disabilities Re- Labor Interests.

136

moved..

126 Strikes....

136

122

... 190

192

PAGE.

PAGE.
Sporting....
137 Cometallism

155
The Yacht Race Investigation.. 137 The Manufacturers' Association 156
The Passing of Pugilism... 140 The St. Paul Stranded..

157
International Chess Tourna-

Miscellaneous.

157
ment........
140) Canada.....

139
Oxford-Cambridge Race.

140 The Dominion Parliament.--
Notable Crimes..

140 Manitoba School Question..., 159
Affairs in Various States...
142 The Remedial Bill..

161
Iowa....

142 Tupper Ministry Formed. 167
Kentucky

142 The Copyright Question..
Massachusetts,

1431 Ontario. —The Legislature. 169
Minnesota..
143 The Patrons of Industry.

170
New York.

The British Empire League. 170
Greater New York

144
Miscellaneous....

171
The Raines Liquor Bill. 146 The West Indies ......

172
The School Reform Bill 148 Hayti....

172
Political Developments.. 149 Riot at St. Kitts

173
Miscellaneous...
150 Central America..

173
Ohio...

151 The Nicaragua Canal.
South Dakota
152 The Panama Canal..

175
Texas...

152 South American Republics....
Utah..
152 Colombia

176
Wisconsin.

153 Venezuela..
Personal and Miscellaneous... 153 Ecuador.

176
Personal Notes....
153 Brazil..

177
The Stanford Case..

155

AFFAIRS IN EUROPE.
Great Britain and Ireland..
1771 Miscellaneous.

190
Parliamentary Proceedings.... 177 France.

190
Naval Defense..

179 A Political Crisis.
The New School Bill.

180 Miscellaneous..
Intra-Imperial Free Trade. 181 Italy.

193
The Irish Nationalists..

183 Fall of the Crispi Ministry...... 153
General Political Situation. 184 Austria-Hungary.

19
Miscellaneous....
185 Russia..

186
Labor Interests.....

187 Belgium..
Germany...
187/Servia.

196
Celebration of the Empire. 187 Greece.

198
Insurance Retaliation .......... 189

AFFAIRS IN ASIA.
India....

197 Samoa...
Australasia.
197 The Republic of Hawaii.

199
Malaysia....

198

AFFAIRS IN AFRICA.
Affairs in Africa....

2001 Morocco..
The Waller Case...

200 Suppressing the Slave Trade ... 33
The Kongo Free State.
200 Rebellion in Mozambique

913
Egypt....

202 African Commerce.
SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND MISCELLANY.
SCIENCE...
204 ARCHÆOLOGY..

216
Geographical Exploration...... 204 The American School at Athens 216
Astronomy:
205 Babylonian Discoveries.

216
Atomic Weight of Helium.

Miscellaneous..

217
Color Photography..

207 RELIGION.......
Rapid-Printing Telegraphy. 207 The A. L. G. A. C
The Kinematograph..

207 Missions in Japan..
Aseptolin....

208 Miscellaneous...
Mannocitin

208 IMPORTANT STATISTICS
Miscellaneous.

208 Mineral Production of the
ART
210 United States..

221
The Royal Academy

210 Foreign Trade and Immigration 221
Exhibitions.

211 DISASTERS.
Sales....

212 American.
EDUCATION..

212 Foreign..
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA.
213 LITERATURE.

994
NECROLOGY.
AMERICAN...
237 FOREIGN

.... 244

199

« ZurückWeiter »