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cleared by his Gospel, and shewn us that the body may and shall be united to the spirit in the day of the Lord, so that the complete man shall stand before the great tribunal, to receive a just recompence of reward for the things done in the body. This has restored religion, which had hardly one sound foot to stand on, and made our faith and our reason consistent, which were before at too great a distance. Nature indeed taught us to hope for immortality; but it was in spite of sense and experience, till the great Prince of our peace appeared, who brought life and immortality to light through his Gospel

DRYDEN

John Dryden, the celebrated poet, son of Erasmus Dryden, of Tichmersh in Northamptonshire, baronet, was born at Aldwinkle in that county, in 1631. He was educated at Westminster, where he was king's scholar, under the famous Dr. Busby; whence he was elected, in 1650, scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge.

In 1662, he was chosen fellow of the Royal Society; and on the death of sir William Davenant, in 1669, was made poet-laureat and historiographer to Charles II. Soon after the accession of James II. Dryden was converted to popery; in consequence of which, he was dismissed at the revolution from his office of poet-lau,reat. His life is so well known that it were

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needless to add other particulars. He died in 1701.

The prose works of Dryden were collected, in 1900, into four volumes octavo, by Mr. Malone, with notes and illustrations; to which is prefixed an account of the life and writings of the author. This publication contains also a collection of his letters, the greater part of which was never before published. It were superfluous to specify the several particulars in this collection. It is sufficient to observe, that the most valuable of the prose productions of Dryden, is his “ Essay on Dramatic Poesy,” from which alone I shall make my selections. This celebrated essay contains the relation of a dialogue, supposed to have taken place between Eugenius, Çrites, Lisideius, and Meander, who, on occasion of the engagement between the English and Dutch fleets, June 3, 1665, about eight leagues to the east of Lowestoff in Suffolk, are represented to have taken a barge, and proceeded down the -Thames towards Greenwich, that they may listen more attentively to the low and hollow murmurings, arising from the reports of the distant canon.; When the noise had ceased, and they had congratulated each other by anticipation on the

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victory of their country, the conversation began with Crites' cxpressing his apprehension, that they should now be inundated with a deluge of bad verses on that memorable occagion. After some desultory talking, the dispute is limited to dramatic poetry, when Lisideius* defines a play to be :

- A just and lively image of human nature, representing its passions and humours, and the changes of fortune to which it is subject, for the delight and instruction of mankind.”

I have room only for his admirable charac-. ters of our principal dramatists.

* The characters in this dialogue allude to real personages, who are thus identified by Mr. Malone :-" The person hid under the feigned name of Eugenius, as we shall presently find, was Charles, earl of Dorset. Crites and Lisideius, perhaps, were meant to represent Wentworth, carl of Ruscommon, (or as he corrects himself in a subsequent note, more probably sir Robert Howard) and John Sheffield, earl of Musgrave, afterwards duke of Bucks and Normandy, under the character of Neander, who, in the latter part of this essay, appears as a strenuous advo. cate for rhyming tragedies. Our author himself, I conceive, is shadowed."

cleared by his Gospel, and shewn us that the body may and shall be united to the spirit in the day of the Lord, so that the complete man shall stand be fore the great tribunal, to receive a just recompence of reward for the things done in the body. *** This has restored religion, which had hardly one sound foot to stand on, and made our faith and our reason consistent, which were before at too great a distance. Nature indeed taught us to hope for immortality; but it was in spite of sense and experience, till the great Prince of our peace appeared, who brought life and immortality to light through his Gospel

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