London lions for country cousins and friends about town, being all the new buildings, improvements and amusements in the British metropolis

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William Charlton Wright, 1826 - 112 Seiten
 

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Seite 14 - But free and common as the sea or wind; When he, to boast or to disperse his stores, Full of the tributes of his grateful shores, Visits the world, and in his flying towers Brings home to us, and makes both Indies ours; Finds wealth where 'tis, bestows it where it wants, Cities in deserts, woods in cities plants; So that to us no thing, no place is strange, While his fair bosom is the world's exchange.
Seite 14 - But free and common as the sea or wind : When he to boast or to disperse his stores, Full of the tributes of his grateful shores, Visits the world, and in his flying towers Brings home to us, and makes both Indies ours ; Finds wealth where 'tis, bestows it where it wants, Cities in deserts, woods in cities, plants.
Seite 14 - Nor then destroys it with too fond a stay, Like mothers which their infants overlay ; Nor, with a sudden and impetuous wave, Like profuse kings, resumes the wealth he gave ; No unexpected inundations spoil The mower's hopes...
Seite 14 - twixt anger, shame, and fear, Those for what's past, and this for what's too near, My eye, descending from the hill, surveys Where Thames among the wanton valleys strays. Thames, the most lov'd of all the Ocean's sons By his old sire, to his embraces runs ; Hasting to pay his tribute to the sea, Like mortal life to meet eternity. Though with those streams he no resemblance hoi*. Whose foam is amber, and their gravel gold, His genuine and less guilty wealth t...
Seite 22 - Builders, and to this finery every thing out of sight is sacrificed, or is no further an object of attention, than that no defects in the constructive and substantial parts shall make their appearance while the Houses are on Sale; and...
Seite 96 - The great dome over the central area is supported by eight stupendous piers, four of the arches formed by which open into the side aisles. The cathedral church of Ely is said to be the only other one in this country, in which the central area is thus pierced by the side aisles. The advantages of this mode of construction are, that it gives an air of superior lightness to the clustered columns, affords striking and picturesque views in every direction, and gives greater unity to the whole area of...
Seite 38 - The first, viz. the porch and entrance, is for catechumens, or the children to be instructed in the principles of religion ; where no child is to be admitted but what can read and write. The second apartment is for the lower boys, to be taught by the second master or usher ; the third for the upper forms, under the head master: which two parts of the school are divided by a curtain, to be drawn at pleasure. Over the master's chair is an image of the child Jesus, of admirable work, in lhe gesture...
Seite 21 - ... (see the engraved plan of the Regent's Park) "which commands at every turn some fresh features of an extensive country prospect. " This is indeed a desirable appendage to so vast a town as London, more especially as the rage for building fills every pleasant outlet with bricks, mortar, rubbish and eternal scaffoldpoles, which, whether you walk east, west, north, or south, seem to be running after you. We heard a gentleman say, the other day, that he was sure a resident in the suburbs could scarcely...
Seite 38 - Hear ye him,' — these words being written at my suggestion. The fourth, or last apartment, is a little chapel for divine service. The school has no corners or hidingplaces, nothing like a cell or closet. The boys have their distinct forms or benches, one above another. Every form holds sixteen, and he that is head or captain of each form has a little kind of desk, by way of pre-eminence. They are not to admit all boys of course, but to choose them...
Seite 21 - The artificial causes of the extension of the Town are the speculations of Builders, encouraged and promoted by Merchants dealing in the materials of Building, and Attorneys with monied Clients...

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