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TABLE OF FEES REFERRED TO BY THE FOREGOING

ORDER.

C. 29—-continued.

PART I.

FEES TO BE TAKEN IN RESPECT of MATTERS IN WHICH The Consul's

INTERPOSITION IS REQUIRED BY LAW.

Matter in respect of which the Fee is to be taken.

Fee.

8.

d.

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For every Declaration made before the Consul in Forms

B., C., F., G., H., and L., in the Schedule to the Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, with a view to the registry, transfer, and transmission of Ships, interests in Ships, or mortgages on Ships

0 5 0 For indorsing a memorandum of change of Master upon the Certificate of Registry

02 0 For granting a Provisional Certificate of Registry. (This fee to be exclusive of fees on Declarations)

0 10 0 For recording a mortgage of a Ship or shares in a Ship made under a Certificate of Mortgage

0 10 0 For recording the transfer of a mortgage of a Ship or shares in a Ship made under a Certificate of Mortgage

07 0 For recording the discharge of a mortgage of a Ship or

shares in a Ship made under a Certificate of Mortgage 0 7 6 For every sale of a Ship or shares in a Ship made before the Consul under a Certificate of Sale

0 10 0 For inspection of the Register Book of Transactions in Ships 0 1 0 For every seaman engaged before the Consul

0 2 0 For every alteration in agreements with seamen made before the Consul .

0 2 0 For every seaman discharged or left behind with the Consul's sanction

0 2 0 For every desertion certified by the Consul .

0 2 0 For attesting a seaman's will

0 2 For examination of provisions or water, to be paid by the party who proves to be in default

0 10 0 For every Salvage Bond made in pursuance of 17 and 18 Vict.

c. 104, sec. 488, to be paid by the master or owner of the property salved .

• 2 0 0 On disbursements in respect of distressed seamen, a com

mission of 21 per cent.

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C. 29-continued.

PART II.

FEES TO BE TAKEN IN RESPECT of MATTERS IN WHICH THE CONSUL's

INTERPOSITION IS TO BE GIVEN ONLY WHEN REQUIRED BY THE
PARTIES INTERESTED.

Matter in respect of which the Fee is to be taken.

Fee.

d. 0 5 0 0 5 0

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For noting a protest, with certified copy if required
For order of survey, with certified copy if required
For extending a protest or survey, with certified copy if
required

1 0 0 And if it exceeds 200 words, for every additional 100 words

0 2 6 For preparing and attesting bottomry or arbitration bond 0 0 For attesting bottomry or arbitration bond not prepared by Consul

05 0 For attendance out of consular office at a shipwreck, or

for the purpose of assisting a ship in distress, or of saving wrecked goods or property, over and above travelling expenses per diem

1 1 0 For attending valuation of goods, if under 2007. in value 0 10 6 For attending valuation of goods, if 2001. and upwards in

value, for every day's attendance during which the valuation continues

1 1 0 For attending sale of goods, if the purchase money is under 2001. .

1 0 For attending sale of goods, if the purchase money is 2001.,

or upwards, for every day during which the sale continues 2 2 0 Certificate of due landing of goods exported from the United Kingdom.

( 9 0 Bill of health

0 10 0 Visé of passport

2 0 Opening of Will of a British subject, not being a seaman 1 1 0 Management of property of a British subject, not being a

seaman, dying intestate, commission of 24 per cent. Registration of documents or other matters

2 6 And if exceeding 100 words, for every additional 100 words 0 0 6 For

every certified copy of a document not before mentioned 0 2 And if it exceeds 100 words, for every additional 100 words 0 6 For administering an oath or declaration, including attestation of signature if required

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C. 29—continued.

Fee.

d. 0

Matter in respect of which the Fee is to be taken. For attesting a signature

02 For annexing the seal of office and signature to any docu

ment not mentioned in or otherwise provided for by this Table

. 0 5 0

Note 1.—No fee is to be taken for the custody of or indorsement on ship’s articles and papers deposited with the Consul in pursuance of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, Section 279.

Note 2.—Where any fee is fixed by the foregoing Tables for any particular act or transaction, no additional fee is to be demanded for signature, attestation, or annexing seal of office.

Note 3.—The above fees, if not paid in English money, are to be calculated at the current rate of exchange.

C. 30.-See paragraph 176. Statement of the Gross Amount of all Fees and Remuneration received at the British Consulate at

during the Year 18 according to the Table of Fees established by the Act of the 6th Geo. 4, cap. 87, and the Order in Council of the

1 8.

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day of

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year 18

I hereby certify, That the above is a true and correct statement of the total amount of all Fees received at this Consulate within the

and that the average rate of exchange during the year has been as follows: viz.

January the

18

(Place.)

(Signature of the Consul.)

R

CHAPTER IV.

THE CONSULAR DUTIES IN THE LEVANT AND TURKEY.

Lct everything be observed in conformity to these Capitulations, and contrary

thereto let nothing be done." WE

ERE it the object of this work to recapitulate the history of

the great nations now slumbering in the East, borne down by the stream of time, and passed like a shadow from among us, we might fill volumes with the history of kings and people who have traversed those parts, and are now beneath the shade whence none return. From the foundation of the Roman Empire, through her triumphs and decline; through the glories of Greece, and the capture of Constantinople, what lessons can be afforded to the Consul. This, however, does not come within our present aim.

We shall, therefore, begin with the reign of Sultan Mehemed-with the capitulations and articles of peace between Great Britain and the Ottoman Empire, as agreed upon, augmented, and altered at different periods, and finally confirmed by the Treaty of Peace, concluded at the Dardanelles, in 1809, in which it was stipulated, that the English nation and merchants should trade and go into the Ottoman dominions without any prejudice or molestation being given to their persons, property, or effects, by any person whomsoever. That English ships and vessels, entering the ports and harbours of the Ottoman States, shall and may safely abide and remain therein;, and at their free will and pleasure depart therefrom, without any opposition or hindrance from any one. That if any ship be wrecked, all Beys, etc., shall give all help and assistance, and restore whatever goods may be driven ashore. The Preamble of the Treaty then goes on relating the privileges as regard Englishmen absconding for debt, or becoming bankrupt. That all cases of calumniation shall be referred to the Ambassador. That all Englishmen found as slaves, shall be immediately delivered to the Consuls. That the English Ambassador might establish Consuls at Aleppo, Alexandria, Tripoli, Barbary, Scio, Smyrna. All disputes between the English should be settled by the Ambassador; all capitulations and privileges granted to other princes should be extended to the English.

During the reign of James II., an Ambassador was also sent to the Sublime Port, who added fresh articles to the above treaty.

Queen Anne, also, about the year 1708, sent an Ambassador to the Sultan, for the furthering of other and more extensive privileges to the English. Again, in the reign of the Georges, Ambassadors were

sent for the same object, and greatly increased the immunities the British mercantile community enjoy in the Turkish dominions.

In the reign of His Majesty George III., an important treaty was concluded on the 5th January, 1809, by Robert Adair, Esq., which became the treaty of peace and friendship, in which the before-mentioned capitulations, agreed upon, in 1675, were again put in force; and that like reciprocity should be given to Turkish vessels trading to the English ports. That Consuls may be appointed, and Ambassadors furnish themselves with dragomen.

In the reign of George IV., an Act of Parliament was passed relating to the Levant Company, a part of which has been since repealed by the 6 & 7 Vict. c. 94.

In furtherance of the above Treaties, firmans were issued in 1799 and 1835, the first granting to English Merchant vessels the privileges of commerce in the Black Sea, and the other relative to the execution in Egypt of the Treaties of commerce between the Ottoman Porte and Great Britain.

On the 13th August, 1836, an Act of Parliament was passed to enable His Majesty to make regulations for the better defining and establishing the powers and jurisdiction of His Majesty's Consuls in the Ottoman Porte. This Act has been since repealed by the 6 and 7 Vict. cap. 34.

On the 16th August, 1838, a further Convention was signed at Balta-Liman, amending and altering certain stipulations contained in the capitulations before mentioned, and confirming those not so amended for now and for ever; regulating the purchase of all articles in the Turkish dominions, and the Tariff of duties, and for the issue of firmans, and the circumstances rising therefrom. An additional Article was also added to this, relating to the above stipulations; and on the 27th August, 1838, an explanatory note relative to the second Article was delivered to Her Majesty's Ambassador.

We then pass to the Convention between Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, and Russia, and the Ottoman Porte, which has so often been discussed in the present period, but which does not form part of the object we have in view, and to that of 1841, respecting the passage of the Dardanelles and Bosphorus by ships of war.

Passing along in panoramic view, as it might be, we come to the Act of Parliament 6 and 7 Vict. cap. 94, repealing part of the 6 Geo. IV. c. 33, and that of the 6 and 7 Wm. IV. c. 78; to the Order in Council of the 2nd October, 1843, providing for the temporary exercise of power and jurisdiction by British Functionaries in the Ottoman dominions ; and that of the 19th June, 1844, being for the exercise of power and jurisdiction by British Functionaries in the states of the Sultan.

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