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the officers herein provided, the captains and lieutenants not required for duty with the troops shall be available for detail as regimental and squadron staff officers and such other details as may be authorized by law or regulations. Squadron adjutants shall receive one thousand eight hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of first lieutenants; squadron quartermasters and commissaries shall receive one thousand six hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of second lieutenants. Each cavalry band shall be organized as now provided by law. Each troop of cavalry shall consist of one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieutenant, one first sergeant, one quartermastersergeant, six sergeants, six corporals, two cooks, two farriers and blacksmiths, one saddler, one wagoner, two trumpeters, and forty-three privates; the commissioned officers to be assigned from among those herein before authorized: Provided, That the President, in his discretion, may increase the number of corporals in any troop of cavalry to eight, and the number of privates to seventy-six, but the total number of enlisted men authorized for the whole Army shall not at any time be exceeded. Sec. 2, ibid.

THE ARTILLERY CORPS.

That the regimental organization of the artillery arm of the United States Army is hereby discontinued, and that arm is constituted and designated as the Artillery Corps. It shall be organized as hereinafter specified and shall belong to the line of the Army. Sec. 3, ibid.

That the Artillery Corps shall comprise two branchesthe coast artillery and the field artillery. The coast artillery is defined as that portion charged with the care and use of the fixed and movable elements of land and coast fortifications, including the submarine mine and torpedo defenses; and the field artillery as that portion accompanying an army in the field, and including field and light artillery proper, horse artillery, siege artillery, mountain artillery, and also machine-gun batteries: Provided, That this shall not be construed to limit the authority of the Secretary of War to order coast artillery to any duty which the public service demands or to prevent the use of machine or other field guns by any other arm of the service under the direction of the Secretary of War. Sec. 4, ibid.

That all officers of artillery shall be placed on one list, in respect to promotion, according to seniority in their several grades, and shall be assigned to coast or to field artillery according to their special aptitude for the respective services. Sec. 5, ibid.

That the Artillery Corps shall consist of a Chief of Artillery, who shall be selected and detailed by the President from the colonels of artillery, to serve on the staff of the general officer commanding the Army, and whose duties shall be prescribed by the Secretary of War; fourteen colonels, one of whom shall be the Chief of Artilley; thirteen lieutenant-colonels, thirty-nine majors, one hundred and ninety-tive captains, one hundred and ninety-five first lieutenants, one hundred and ninety-five second lieutenants: and the captains and lieutenants provided for in this section not required for duty with batteries or companies shall be available for duty as staff officers of the various artillery garrisons and such other details as may be authorized by law and regulations; twenty-one sergeants-major, with the rank, pay, and allowances of regimental sergeantsmajor of infantry; twenty-seven sergeants-major, with the rank, pay, and allowances of battalion sergeants-major of infantry; one electrician sergeant to each coast artillery post having electrical appliances; thirty batteries of field artillery, one hundred and twenty-six batteries of coast artillery, and ten bands organized as now authorized by law for artillery regiments: Provided, That the aggregate number of enlisted men for the artillery, as provided under this Act, shall not exceed eighteen thousand nine hundred and twenty, exclusive of electrician sergeants. Sec. 6, ibid.

Twelve of the veterinarians herein provided for may be assigned to the artillery. Act of March 3, 1901 (31 Stat. L., 901).

That each company of coast artillery shall be organized as is now prescribed by law for a battery of artillery: Provided, that the enlisted strength of any company may be fixed, under the direction of the Secretary of War, according to the requirements of the service to which it may assigned: And provided, That first-class gunners shall receive two dollars a month, and second-class gunners one dollar per month in addition to their pay. Sec. 7, act of February 2, 1901 (31 Stat. L., 749).

That each battery of field artillery shall be organized as is now prescribed by law, and the enlisted strength thereof shall be fixed under the direction of the Secretary of War. Sec. 8, ibid.

That the increase herein provided for the artillery shall be made as follows: Not less than twenty per centum before

July first, nineteen hundred and one, and not less than twenty per centum each succeeding twelve months until the total number provided for shall have been attained. All vacancies created or caused by this Act shall be filled by promotion according to seniority in the artillery arm. Second lieutenants of infantry or cavalry may, in the discretion of the President, be transferred to the artillery arm, taking rank therein according to date of commission, and such transfers shall be subject to approval by a board of artillery officers appointed to pass upon the capacity of such officers for artillery service: Provided, That the increase of officers of artillery shall be only in proportion to the increase of men. Sec. 9, ibid.

INFANTRY.

That each regiment of infantry shall consist of one colonel, one lieutenant-colonel, three majors, fifteen captains, fifteeen first lieutenants, and fifteen second lieutenants; one sergeant-major, one quartermaster-sergeant, one commissary-sergeant, three battalion sergeants-major, two color sergeants, with rank, pay, and allowances of battalion sergeants-major, one band, and twelve companies, organized into three battalions of four companies each. Of the officers herein provided, the captains and lieutenants not required for duty with the companies shall be available for detail as regimental and battalion staff officers and such other details as may be authorized by law or regulations. Battalion adjutants shall receive one thousand eight hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of first lieutenants, mounted; battalion quartermasters and commissaries shall receive one thousand six hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of second lieutenants, mounted. Each intantry band shall be organized as now provided by law. Each infantry company shall consist of one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieutenant, one first sergeant, one quartermaster-sergeant, four sergeants, six corporals, two cooks, two musicians, one artificer, and forty-eight privates, the commissioned officers to be assigned from those hereinbefore authorized: Provided, That the President, in his discretion, may increase the number of sergeants in any company of infantry to six, the number of corporals to ten, and the number of privates to one hundred and twenty-seven, but the total number of enlisted men authorized for the whole Army shall not, at any time, be exceeded. Sec. 10, ibid.

ENGINEER TROPS.

That the enlisted force of the Corps of Engineers shall consist of one band and three battalions of engineers. The engineers band shall be organized as now provided by law for bands of infantry regiments. Each battalion of engineers shall consist of one sergeant-major, one quartermaster-sergeant, and four companies. Each company of engineers shall consist of one first sergeant, one quartermaster-sergeant, with the rank, pay, and allowances of sergeant, eight sergeants, ten corporals, two musicians, two cooks, thirty-eight first-class and thirtyeight second-class privates: Provided, That the President may, in his discretion, increase the number of sergeants in any company of engineers to twelve, the number of corporals to eighteen, the number of first-class privates to sixty-four, and the number of second-class privates to sixty-four, but the total number of enlisted men authorized for the whole Army shall not, at any time, be exceeded: And provided, That officers detailed from the Corps of Engineers to serve as battalion adjutants and battalion quartermasters and commissaries shall, while so serving, receive the pay and allowances herein authorized for battalion staff officers of infantry regiments. Sec. 11, ibid.

CHAPLAINS.

That the President is authorized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, chaplains in the Army, at the rate of one for each regiment of cavalry and infantry in the United States service and twelve for the corps of artillery, with the rank, pay, and allowances of captains of infantry: Provided, That no person shall be appointed a chaplain in the Regular Army who shall have passed the age of forty years, nor until he shall have established his fitness as required by existing law: And provided, That the office of post chaplain is abolished, and the officers now holding commissions as chaplains, or who may hereafter be appointed chaplains, shall be assigned to regiments or to corps of artillery. Chaplains may be assigned to such stations as the Secretary of War shall direct, and they may be transferred, as chaplains, from one branch of the service or from one regiment to another by the Secretary of War, without further commission. When serving in the field, chaplains shall be furnished

with necessary means of transportation by the Quartermaster's Department. Sec. 12, ibid.

THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT.

That the Adjutant-General's Department shall consist of one Adjutant-General with the rank of major-general, and when a vacancy shall occur in the office of Adjutant-General on the expiration of the service of the present incumbent, by retirement or otherwise, the Adjutant-General shall thereafter have the rank and pay of a brigadier-general, five assistant adjutants-general with the rank of colonel, seven assistant adjutants-general with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and fifteen assistant adjutants-general with the rank of major: Provided, That all vacancies created or caused by this section shall, as far as possible, be filled by promotion according to seniority of officers of the AdjutantGeneral's Deparment. Sec. 13, ibid.

THE INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT.

That the Inspector-General's Department shall consist of one Inspector-General with the rank of brigadier-general, four inspectors-general with the rank of colonel, four inspectors-general with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and eight inspectors-general with the rank of major: Provided, That all vacancies created or caused by this section shall be filled, as far as possible, by promotion according to seniority of officers of the Inspector-General's Department. Sec. 14, ibid.

Upon the occurrence of a vacancy in the grade of colonel in the Inspector-General's Department after the present lieutenant-colonels therein shall have been promoted or retired, such vacancy shall not be filled, and thereafter the number of officers authorized for that department shall be as follows: One inspector-general with the rank of brigadier-general; three inspectors-general with the rank of colonel; four inspectors-general with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and nine inspectors-general with the rank of major. Act of March 3, 1901 (31 Stat. L., 899).

THE JUDGE-ADVOCATE-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT.

That the Judge-Advocate-General's Department shall consist of one Judge-Advocate-General with the rank of brigadier-general, two judge-advocates with the rank of colonel, three judge-advocates with the rank of lieutenant

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