Diary of a journey overland, through the Maritime Provinces of China from Manchao, on the south coast of Hainan, to Canton in the years 1819 and 1820

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Sir R. Phillips, 1822 - 116 Seiten
 

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Seite 77 - O'er the dark trees a yellower verdure shed, And tip with silver every mountain's head ; Then shine the vales, the rocks in prospect rise, A flood of glory bursts from all the skies; The conscious swains, rejoicing in the sight. Eye the blue vault, and bless the useful light.
Seite 96 - Portugueze ships arrive at Macao, it is incumbent to search and examine each ship. And let the viceroy widely publish a proclamation, stating, that Opium, being an article produced abroad, and from thence flowing into China: and as every region has its usages and climate proper for itself, and differing from others, the celestial empire does not forbid you people to make and eat Opium, and diffuse the custom in your native place.
Seite 32 - Seldom is there a houshold without its internal divisions, and lasting enmities, most commonly too on the score of interest. The women partake of this spirit of discord. Held in slavish subjection by the men, they rise in furious passions against each other, which vent themselves in such loud, virulent...
Seite 97 - ... officer from the custom-house, and to the armed police at Whampoa, to be very strict in searching ; and further confidential soldiers are sent in all directions to search and seize. " Besides these precautions, the Hong merchants are required to promulgate to all foreign factory chiefs, resident at Macao or Canton, our commands to them to yield implicit obedience to former imperial edicts, which disallow the clandestine introduction of opium, and which require the sources from which it comes...
Seite 96 - Majesty's command, and frequent proclamations have been issued against it, which are on record. But the passages on the coast of Canton being very numerous, Macao being the resort of foreigners, and Whampoa being the anchorage for foreign ships, should be more strictly watched and searched. "It is found on record, that during the...
Seite 106 - Yuen-mun-paa (ie A report from the outer gate of the palace,) containing about 500 words, or monosyllables, is printed .with these wooden types, but in so clumsy a manner as to be scarcely legible . , At Macao, in the Missionary department of the College of St. Joseph, I have seen several large cases full of this description of type, with which they print such Roman Catholic books as are wanted for the Missions. In the .Anglo- Chinese College Library at Malacca, there is a Life of the Blessed Virgin...
Seite 38 - I have been able to learn, are iiijf.ir, betel-nut, cocoa-nuts, cocoa-nut oil, salt, and tanned hides: the imports consist of a great variety of China articles, cotton, furs, English broadcloth, flints, and opium ; all which they receive by way of China. The junks take in their cargoes and sail hence about the month of May or June for the coast, and the trading-vessels from China arrive here with the last of the northeast monsoon, and return with the first of the southwest monsoon. " In this city,...
Seite 115 - To exalt and aggrandi/ privileged orders of men, and keep the people in a low, degrading servitude, ever children in understanding, and the vassals of arbitrary power, seems the uniform tendency of every native government on this side of India, without the exception of one. Their constitutions seem framed on this principle, and the spirit of their laws tends to this end. In as far as the theory of their governments may be investigated and reduced to general philosophical principles, and the annual...
Seite 100 - Most of the forms of mythology which make any figure in the page of history, now exist in China, except that their indecent parts, and their direct tendency to injure human life, have been cut off.
Seite 104 - ... which sets every thing masculine in so exalted, and every thing feminine in so inferior, a light, was doubtless greatly increased thereby. Their general belief in the metempsychosis, and in the inevitable decisions of a numerical fate, prevents the cordial exercise of benevolence and beneficence. Their cold-hearted philosophy, indeed, teaches and applauds the practice of alms-deeds. Charity falls clear as the dew-drop from the lips and pens of their sages, but often freezes ere it reach the ground....

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