The Works of John Locke, Band 9

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Thomas Tegg, 1823
 

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Seite 263 - And it shall come to pass, if they will not believe also these two signs, neither hearken unto thy voice, that thou shalt take of the water of the river, and pour it upon the dry land: and the water which thou takest out of the river shall become blood upon the dry land.
Seite 263 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.
Seite 132 - Wisdom I take, in the popular acceptation, for a man's managing his business ably, and with foresight, in this world. This is the product of a good natural temper, application of mind and experience together, and so above the reach of children. The...
Seite 27 - ... safely enough indulge their little irregularities, and make themselves sport with that pretty perverseness, which they think well enough becomes that innocent age. But to a fond parent, that would not have his child corrected for a perverse trick, but excused it, saying it was a small matter; Solon very well replied, ' Ay, but custom is a great one.'2 35.
Seite 69 - It will perhaps be wondered that I mention reasoning with children; and yet I cannot but think that the true way of dealing with them. They understand it as early as they do language; and, if I misobserve not, they love to be treated as rational creatures sooner than is imagined.
Seite 181 - If any one among us have a facility or purity more than ordinary in his mother tongue, it is owing to chance, or his genius, or any thing, rather than to his education or any care of his teacher.
Seite 282 - God forbid that I should justify you : Till I die I will not remove mine integrity from me. My righteousness I hold fast, and will not let it go : My heart shall not reproach me so long as I live.
Seite 133 - There are two sorts of ill-breeding: the one a sheepish bashfulness, and the other a mis-becoming negligence and disrespect in our carriage; both which are avoided by duly observing this one rule, not to think meanly of ourselves, and not to think meanly of others.
Seite 154 - ... at the same time he might have his mind and manners formed, and he be instructed to boot in several sciences, such as are a good part of geography, astronomy, chronology, anatomy, besides some parts of history', and all other parts of knowledge of things that fall under the senses and require little more than memory.
Seite 6 - I think I may say, that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education. It is that which makes the great difference in mankind. The little, or almost insensible impressions on our tender infancies, have very important and lasting consequences.

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