Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Certificate in Favor George Cabot.

Boston Octo. 9. 1783 This Certifies

That the sum of One hundred & sixty three Pounds, two shillings, for part of the Arm’d ship Black Prince lost on the Expedition to Penobscott in the year 1779. and forty one pounds, nine shillings & one penny for Interest thereon to the first Instant, both sums amounting to Two hundred & four pounds eleven shillings & two pence, is due to George Cabot which when paid to George Williams Esq" will be in full for the same —£204 .. 11.12

Thomas Ivers / Comtee for Audits the Accots of

Peter Roe Dalton the late Board of War. His Excellency the Governor & the Hon the Council of the

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In Council Oct 13th 1783

Advised that a Warrant be drawn on the Treas' in full Discharge of this Certificate

John Avery Sec

Certificate in Favor John Lovett.

Boston Octo 9, 1783 This Certifies

That the sum of Two hundred & seventeen pounds, nine shillings & four pence, for part of the Ship Black prince, lost on the Expedition to Penobscott in the year 1779. and Fifty-five pounds, five shillings & five pence for Interest due thereon to the first Instant, both sums amounting to Two hundred & seventy two pounds, fourteen shillings & nine pence, is due to John Lovett, which when paid to George Williams Esq' will be in full for the same — £272.14.9

Thomas Ivers / Acets of the late Board of War.
Peter Roe Daltons Comtee for auditing the

Commonwealth of Massachusetts
His Excellency the Governor, & the Hon. the Council of the

In Council Oct 13th 1783

Advised that a Warrant be drawn on the Treasury in full Discharge of this Certificate —

John Avery Sec

Certificate in Favor John Gardner Jr.

VO

Boston Octo. 9. 1783 This Certifies

That the sum of One hundred & twenty seven Pounds, one shilling & seven pence half penny, for part of the Arm’d ship Black prince, lost on Expedition to Penobscott in the year 1779, and thirty two Pounds, nine Shillings & eight pence half penny. for Interest thereon to the first Instant, both sums amounting to One hundred & fifty nine pounds, eleven shillings & four pence, is due to John Gardner Jun" which when paid to George Williams Esq' will be in full for the same — £159.11.4

Thomas Ivers Comtee for Audits the Accts of the

Peter Roe Dalton , late Board of War — His Excellency the Governor & the Hon. the Council of the

Commonwealth of Massachusetts

In Council Oct 14th 1783

Advised that a Warrant be drawn on the Treas' in full of this Certificate —

John Avery Sec?

Certificate in Favor Andrew Cabot.

Boston 6th Octo. 1783 This Certifies

That the sum of Three thousand, three hundred & eighty five Pounds, four shillings & nine pence, for one half of the Arm’d Brig Defence, appurt & lost on the Expedition to Penobscott in the year 1779 — and the sum of eight hundred & sixty Pounds, eight shillings & two pence, for Interest thereon to the first Instant, both sums amounting to Four thousand two hundred & forty five Pounds, twelve shillings & eleven pence, is due to Andrew Cabot Esq. which when paid will be in full for the same — £4245.12.11

Thomas Ivers / Comte for auditing the Accots

Peter Roe Dalton" of the late Board of War His Excellency the Governor & the Hon. the Council of the

Commonwealth of Massachusetts In Council Oct 14 1783

Advised that a Warrant be drawn on the Treasury in full Discharge of this Certificate.

John Avery Sec

Certificate in Favor Jonathan Peele.

Boston 14 Octo. 1783 This Certifies

That the sum of Five hundred & thirty one Pounds eleven shillings & five pence, is due to Joseph Sprague, for the Balance due to him, for his eleventh part of the arm'd Ship Hector, lost on the Expedition to Penobscott in the year 1779. which sum when paid to Jonathan Peele will be in full for the same — £531.11.5 Thomas Ivers , the A/cts of the late Board of War. Peter Roe Dalton) Comtee for Audits His Excellency the Governor & the Hon, the Council of the

Commonwealth of Massachusetts

In Council 21st October 1783

Advised that a Warrant be drawn on the Treasury in full Discharge of this Certificate

John Avery Sec

Observations on Public Men.

General Washington.

Soon the Protector of America. A deep endless ambition, too thinly veiled to escape the penetration of some of those who saw him constantly in the various scenes of this Revolution, who saw him behind the Couliese, as well as upon the Stage, makes the basis of the character of this man, who has forever inscribed his name in the annals of the world; great, not by shining talents, but by a happy concurrence of circumstances, a good useful understanding, an unwearied passive perseverance, the mediocrity of all his competitors, & the ... or... of his antagonists. Genius it seems is not the growth of this western world, & even when imported droops and dies under this unfavorable Sky: May this be as it will, Genius it seems was not the lot of Washington. Without a spark of imagination, enthusiasm or that torrent of talent that carries everything before it, cold, deliberate, slow, patient, persevering, he now finds himself elevated to a pitch of grandeur he never dream'd of, and would not even now grasp at the supreme power, if, to obtain it, he must as Cromwell, surround the State House and tell them, “begone, the Lord you seek has left this place.” But no such exertion will be requir’d. The nation is sick of Congress, they speak of them with the utmost contempt: Congress themselves are tired of their situation, the unpopularity of which they feel even in the Streets of Princeton, & which is neither lucrative, nor honorable, nor durable enough to attach them. I know that they all expect, and that most of them wish a revolution.

This revolution is near at hand, but I do not venture to affirm that it will affect all America; there is an opposition to it in Congress (a weak one I believe in numbers and power, though not in abilities for I think Thompson is not at the head of it) besides, all the Eastern provinces oppose it, but their joint endeavours cannot entirely prevent it. The junto of Washington, Witherspoon, Marbois & the Cincinnati, besides the clear majority in Congress, & I am confident a majority of the people at large, will certainly carry the point. Congress.

Never was this Areopagus of America composed of men so little respectable either by their abilities, family, or fortune; they are so conscious of it themselves, that they retire from the Eye of the Traveller, to hide their weakness and poverty; but none of them seems more fearful to expose the mock Majesty of his public Character by a knowledge of his private one, than their President, Mr. Wilson it is generally thought will be nominated his Successor, but will not accept of it. His ostensible reason for declining this office is his business; but his real one perhaps, that he would lose his influence by becoming the Speaker of this Senate, that is to say the only man in it that never speaks at all. He is generally thought a French Pensioner, and Man of abilities.

Maryland is most likely to become the residence of Congress, as that State has made the largest offers. This certainly must be an object with men, half a dozen of whom used, even at Philadelphia, to live together with their Families, in a paltry boarding house. At Princeton they certainly will not remain. I heard the objection stated that Baltimore was too warm, but the answer was, "by the time the weather grows warm Congress will sit nowhere. The scene of this conversation was a Tavern.

« ZurückWeiter »