Shouts and Whispers: Twenty-One Writers Speak about Their Writing and Their Faith

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Jennifer L. Holberg
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 31.03.2006 - 257 Seiten
Flannery O'Connor once wrote that "to the hard of hearing you shout, and for the almost-blind you draw large and startling figures." Some of the twenty-one well-known writers included in this book prefer to "shout," as O'Connor did, while others offer what Doris Betts calls "whispering hope."

Shouts and Whispers contains a fascinating array of reflections on topics surrounding the often-perilous intersection of writing and faith. The authors all agree that literature can help us to be more faithful, yet they approach the subject in ways as diverse as their biographies. Some, like Katherine Paterson and Frederick Buechner, propose models of how literature and belief can fruitfully intersect. Several authors offer insightful metaphors for the experience of doing faith-filled writing, while others speak of writing as finding hope in the midst of brokenness. Finally, in essays by Madeleine L'Engle, Thomas Lynch, and others, readers are encouraged to make the connection between writing and embodiment, translating words into actions.

While the essays, addresses, and interviews in Shouts and Whispers are by no means the final word, they will provoke rich and nuanced reflection on the dynamic relationship between faith and writing.

Interviews with:
Joy Kogawa
Anne Lamott
Kathleen Norris
Paul Schrader


Essays by
Doris Betts
Frederick Buechner
Will Campbell
Betty Smartt Carter
Elizabeth Dewberry
David James Duncan
Ron Hansen
Silas House
Jan Karon
Madeleine L'Engle
Bret Lott
Thomas Lynch
Katherine Paterson
James Calvin Schaap
Luci Shaw
Barbara Brown Taylor
Walter Wangerin Jr.

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Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

I
1
II
13
III
29
IV
35
V
43
VI
61
VII
72
VIII
85
XIII
130
XIV
152
XV
162
XVI
172
XVII
183
XVIII
194
XIX
201
XX
214

IX
95
X
105
XI
113
XII
120
XXI
225
XXII
240
XXIII
256
Urheberrecht

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 27 - There was a time when meadow, grove and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream. It is not now as it hath been of yore ; — Turn wheresoe'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more.
Seite 106 - And she brought forth her first-born son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.
Seite 74 - The law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul : the testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple. The statutes of the Lord are right, rejoicing the heart : the commandment of the Lord is pure, enlightening the eyes.
Seite 29 - ... for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, "Peace be with you.
Seite 17 - Behold, the man has become like one of us, knowing good and evil; and now, lest he put forth his hand and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever...
Seite 110 - No man is an Hand, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the continent, a part of the maine; if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as well as if a...
Seite 74 - Moreover by them is thy servant warned: and in keeping of them there is great reward. Who can understand his errors? cleanse thou me from secret faults. Keep back thy servant also from presumptuous sins; let them not have dominion over me: then shall I be upright, and I shall be innocent from the great transgression.
Seite 100 - I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint. My heart is like wax; it is melted in the midst of my bowels.
Seite 17 - You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die.
Seite 27 - Thanks to the human heart by which we live, Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears ; To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.

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