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THE

OURISTIAN ECONOMY:

TRANSLATED FROM

TEE ORIGINAL GREEB

OF

An Old Manuscript

FOUND IN

THE ISLAND OF PATMOS

WHERE ST. JOHN WROTE

BILE BOOK OT TIL REVLLATION

GEORGETOWN, DO
SAML. S. RIND-CONGRESS STREET.

1830.

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INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.

It will be necessary, before the reader enters on this little tract, that he be acquainted with the means whereby it fell into my hands, and the reasons why I have presumed to send it into the world. Of the first, the following letter from my worthy and much esteemed friend will sufficiently inform him; and my sincere desire of doing all the good possible within my sphere, will I trust, satisfy him also on the latter. There appears to me so true a spirit of christianity breathing through the whole, so-concise, and at the same time so regular a display of our duty, that I must confess I could be glad it was in the hands of every christian ; since from my own experience, (the best way of judging) I can well answer for its advantages. And I cannot help.recommending it to the serious attention of all pious persons; earnestly requesting of them as they,, onits perusal, shall see and feel its usefulness, that they endeavour to disperse it abroad, and so renderit, under the High and Holy One, if he thinks good, an instrument to Spread his faith and increase the number of his children. This will appear to have been the principal design in my benevolent correspondent; and I should ill discharge the duties of our mutual love, if I failed in the performance of any single request

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of his. I trust the candid reader will excuse expressions in his letter which the freedom of such a correspondence may well justify, though in the eye of the public it may appear like vanity in me to send them abroad; but unwilling in any respect, to alter any single expression in this kind epistle, I here subjoin it exactly from his own copy.

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Introductory Remarks.

My Dear Friend.--I have agreeably to your kind request, sent you already three letters, which I fear have been but little entertaining and scarcely deserving your notice, did not your love for me make them welcome, and as you are pleased to say, render even a word from me delightful. I thank you for your tender concer; and believe me, my heart is no less warm to you, and no less" transported when my thoughts are fixed upon you:and when, my dear friend, has the sun yet beheld me during his daily course, forgetful of you? I have a much nobler object for my esteem and contemplation, and should wonder did I forget him who hath enabled me to contentplate and esteem that object; a thought which, as it always fills me with the greatest joy, so does it cause me to look on you with the highest veneration. And surely is it not to be admitted, that we hold those in the truest respect who have dragged us from darkness to light, who have prevented us from falling into the pit of destruction, and made us heirs of that hope which pointeth to immortality ? Such as the noblest benefactors, certainly merit the greatest réverence; and the gratitude which' is due to such, being founded on eternity, like eternity will never end. Wonder not that I am insensibly fallen into these thoughts, which you will object to me, are the constant topics of all my letters, and of course so often repeated;" must either grow tedious or sound like flattery: but on my word 'this is not the case : I was drawn into such reflections by

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