An Inquiry Into the History, Authenticity, & Characteristics of the Shakspeare Portraits: In which the Criticisms of Malone, Steevens, Boaden, & Others, are Examined, Confirmed, Or Refuted. Embracing the Felton, the Chandos, the Duke of Somerset's Pictures, the Droeshout Print, and the Monument of Shakspeare, at Stratford; Together with an Exposé of the Spurious Pictures and Prints, Band 2

Cover
The author, 1827 - 254 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 18 - Reader THIS Figure, that thou here seest put, It was for gentle Shakespeare cut; Wherein the Graver had a strife With Nature, to out-doo the life: O, could he but have drawne his wit As well in brasse, as he hath hit His face; the Print would then surpasse All, that was ever writ in brasse. But, since he cannot, Reader, looke Not on his Picture, but his Booke.
Seite 177 - Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff : you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
Seite 89 - ... lana Tarentino violas imitata veneno. Ac ne forte putes me, quae facere ipse recusem, cum recte tractent alii, laudare maligne, ille per extentum funem mihi posse videtur 210 ire poeta, meum qui pectus inaniter angit, irritat, mulcet, falsis terroribus implet, ut magus, et, modo me Thebis, modo ponit Athenis.
Seite 151 - I can now excuse all his foibles ; impute them to age, and to distress of circumstances : the last of these considerations wrings my very soul to think on. For a man of high spirit, conscious of having, at least in one production, generally pleased the world, to be plagued and threatened by wretches that are low in every sense ; to be forced to drink himself into pains of •William. VOL. 9 — 99 337 the body, in order to get rid of the pains of the mind, is a misery.
Seite 110 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Seite 15 - The fire having continued all this night (if I may call that night which was light as day for ten miles round about, after a dreadful manner) when conspiring with a fierce...
Seite 132 - Olympvs habet. Stay, passenger, why goest thov by so fast ? Read, if thov canst, whom enviovs Death hath plast Within this monvment : SHAKSPEARE : with whome Qvick Natvre dide ; whose name doth deck y» tombe Far more than cost ; sieth all yt he hath writt Leaves living art bvt page to serve his witt. Obiit Ano. Doi. 1616. ^Etatis 53. Die. 23. Ap.
Seite 46 - Shakespeare, thy gift, I place before my sight; With awe, I ask his blessing ere I write ; With reverence look on his majestic face; Proud to be less, but of his godlike race.
Seite 118 - Contend, the leaders of a public cause ; Approach : behold this marble. Know ye not The features ( Hath not oft his faithful tongue Told you the fashion of your own estate, The secrets of your bosom ? Here then, round His monument with reverence while ye stand, Say to each other :
Seite 15 - I know not by what despondency or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it, so that there was nothing heard or seen but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods ; such a strange consternation there was upon them...

Bibliografische Informationen