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fears that war is coming, 175;
feeling against conduct of England,
176; intention of ratifying treaty,
181; withholds signature, 182;
meets crisis alone, 185; letter to
selectmen of Boston, 186; with-
standing popular feeling, 188; his
views and intentions, 189–191; re-
called to Philadelphia, 191; course
in regard to treaty explained, 193;
not influenced in it by Fauchet let-
ter, 195, 196; signs treaty, 197;
treatment of Randolph, 198–201;
reasons for signing treaty, 201, 202;
refuses to send papers relating to
negotiation to the House, 204; rea-
sons for this, 205, 206; choosing a
successor to Morris, 207; appoints

Monroe, 208; appoints Pinckney in

Monroe's place, 210; opinion of
Monroe, 211; contempt for his book,
211; foreign policy reviewed, 213–
215; not chosen to office by a party
216; readiness to hear criticism and
desire to know public opinion, 217;
deplores sectional divisions, 218;
criticisms on newspaper editors,
219; sends Jefferson’s charges to
Hamilton, 225; efforts to keep
peace between his secretaries, 226–
228; risk taken in keeping both
Jefferson and Hamilton in cabinet,
229; consents to stand again for
presidency, 230; feelings on taking
office a second time, 231; attacked
by opposition, 234; opinions of op-
position, 235; view of democratic
societies, 237; believes whiskey re-
bellion due to them, 238; denounces
them, 239; further attacks upon
him, 240; reconstructs cabinet on
party lines, 242; publishes farewell
address, 244; attacked for farewell
address, 246; resents accusation of
being British sympathizer, 248;
careful conduct toward France,
justice to England, 249,250; further
attacks upon, the “Aurora” arti-
cle, 251, 252; denounces forged let-
ters, 253; regards Mr. Adams's
administration as continuing his
own, 254; opinion of Jefferson's
conduct, 255; doubts fidelity of op-
position as soldiers, 255–257; in-
terview with Dr. Logan, 258–261;
feeling as to Virginia and Kentucky
resolutions, 261; letter to Henry,
262; letter on parties to Trumbull,
264; declares himself a Federalist,
266; attitude of Washington as a
É. man, 267–269; farewell dinner
fore leaving presidency, 270; ap-
rance at inauguration of Adams,
uet to, 271; journey to Mt.

Vernon, 272; description of his life
at home, 273–275; meeting with
Bernard, 276–279; interest in cur.
rent politics, 279; accepts command
of army, 280; the affair of the
major-generals, 281 ; annoyance at
conduct of Adams, 282; treatment
of Knox, 283; work in organizing
the army, 285; feeling about France,
and Gerry’s conduct, 286; views
as to nomination of Murray, 287;
effect of French revolution upon
him, 288–290; views of alien and
sedition laws, 291 ; anxiety about
divisions among Federalists, 293;
illness, 294–297; death, 298; char-
acter misunderstood, 299; suffers
from being called faultless, 300;
contemporary attacks upon, 301;
charge that he was not an Ameri-
can, 302; this charge discussed,
303; contrasted with Lincoln, 305–
307; with Hampden, 308; thorough
Americanism of, 309; character of
aristocracy to which he belonged,
310; feeling toward New England,
311 ; democratic in feeling, 312,
313; American training, 315; na-
tional views, 316; American and
national character of his policy,
317-320; opposition to foreign edu-
cation, 320; provisions of his will
in this respect, 321 ; breadth and
strength of his Americanism, 322,
323; charge that he had no decided
views, 324; that he was merely
great in character, 325; great in
intellect, 326; charge that he was
dull and cold, 327; keen observer,
328; knowledge of men, 329–331;
lack of early education, 332; in-
terest in education, 333,334; char-
acter of his writing, books, 335,
336; wrote and talked well, 337;
conversation with Bernard, 338–
342; letter to Mrs. Stockton, 343;
power of paying a compliment, 345;
letter to De Chastellux, 346; ex-
treme exactness in money matters,
anecdotes, 347–350; stern and un-
relenting, but just and not cruel,
351, 352; sympathy with suffering,
353; remembrance of old servant.
conversation with Parson Cleave-
land, 354; hospitality, 355; friend-
ship, 356–361 ; kindness to Taft
family, 362; devotion to his wife
363; kindness to her children and
to his own relations, 364; sense of
humor, 365; love of fun, 367; camp
stories, 368, 369; anecdotes show-
ing sense o humor, 369–373; plays
cards, and dances, 374; fond of
horses, controversy about church
33; distinguished men among them,
33, 34

site, 375; methodical business hab-
its, 376; care as to dress and furni-
ture, 377; dignity and taste, 378;
personal appearance, 379; Acker!
son's description of, 380; appear-
ance on various occasions, 382;
effect on people, 383; violent pas-
sions, 384; fierce temper, 385;
magnanimity, 386 ; religious feel-
ings, 386, 387; summary, 387, 388.
Washington, John, first settler, i. 30;
character, 35; career, 36; death, 37.
Washington, Lawrence, first settler,
i. 30, 35.
Washington, Lawrence, son of first
settler, John, i. 37.
Washington, Lawrence, brother of
George, career of, i. 52; illness of,
60; death of, 62; gives military
education to George, 63; death of
his daughter, 100.
Washington, Lund, rebuked by Wash-
ington for receiving British at Mt.
Vernon, i. 295.
Washington, Martha, wife of George,
his first meeting with, 98; arrival
in Cambridge, 148; relations with
her husband, ii. 363.
Washington, Mary, mother of George,
i. 37; character of, 38, 39, ;
wishes George to earn his living,
47; refuses to let him go to sea,

48.
Washingtons, the, 29–32; origin of,

Wayne, Anthony, defeat after the
Brandywine battle, i. 193; remark.
on Germantown, 194; storms Stony
Point, anecdote of, 261; at battle
of Green Springs, 299; appointed to
command against western Indians,
ii. 98; victory, 100.
Weems, Mason L., his mythical Wash-
ington, i. 10; account of and of his
book, 40, 41; “Rector of Mt. Wer-
non,” 42; cherry-tree and other
stories, 43.
Western posts, importance of,
Washington's opinion, i. 335.
“Whiskey rebellion,” ii. 120–128;
due to democratic societies, 238.
White Plains, battle of, i. 169.
Wilkinson, James, aide to Gates, i.
175; brings news of Saratoga, and
discloses cabal, 214; quarrel with
Gates, 217; resigns from board of
war, 220.
Williams, Mr., Washington's teacher,
i. 46, 52.
Witherspoon, John, remark as to
Wilkinson, i. 214.
Wolcott, Oliver, receives Fauchet let-
ter, ii. 192; Secretary of Treasury,
242.

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