The Federalist Papers

Cover
Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, Clinton Rossiter
Penguin, 2003 - 648 Seiten
'The Federalist Papers' brilliantly defended what was in its time a revolutionary charter - the Constitution of the United States. It explains the complexities of a constitutional government - its political structure and principles based on the inherent rights of man.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Bewertungen von Nutzern

5 Sterne
3
4 Sterne
1
3 Sterne
1
2 Sterne
0
1 Stern
1

We Should All Read This

Nutzerbericht  - redlady77 - Overstock.com

If every American read this book they would have a much better understanding of our Constitution. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Preface
25
AND INFLUENCE
31
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
40
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
44
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
54
THE STATES
60
THE UNION AS A SAFEGUARD AGAINST
66
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
71
THE POWERS CONFERRED BY
260
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
268
RESTRICTIONS ON THE AUTHORITY OF
277
THE ALLEGED DANGER FROM
285
of the same constituentsThe first attachment
292
THESE DEPARTMENTS SHOULD NOT BE
305
PERIODICAL APPEALS TO THE PEOPLE
314
THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
322

THE UTILITY OF THE UNION IN RESPECT
79
THE UTILITY OF THE UNION IN RESPECT
86
ADVANTAGE OF THE UNION IN RESPECT
92
THE INSUFFICIENCY OF THE PRESENT
100
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
108
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
118
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
124
No 21 OTHER DEFECTS OF THE PRESENT
134
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
139
THE NECESSITY OF A GOVERNMENT
148
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
158
THE IDEA OF RESTRAINING THE LEGISLATIVE
163
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
170
CONCERNING THE MILITIA
178
TAXATION
183
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
189
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
197
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
201
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
207
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
213
CONCERNING THE DIFFICULTIES OF
220
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED AND
227
REPUBLICAN PRINCIPLES
236
THE POWERS OF THE CONVENTION TO FORM
243
GENERAL VIEW OF THE POWERS CONFERRED
251
THE APPORTIONMENT OF MEMBERS AMONG
333
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
343
THE ALLEGED TENDENCY OF THE NEW PLAN
348
OBJECTION THAT THE NUMBER OF MEMBERS
354
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
364
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED 370
370
THE SENATE CONTINUED
380
THE POWERS OF THE SENATE
388
THE POWERS OF THE SENATE CONTINUED
394
THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT FURTHER
421
THE PROVISION FOR THE SUPPORT OF
439
THE COMMAND OF THE MILITARY AND NAVAL
445
THE APPOINTING POWER OF
453
THE JUDICIARY DEPARTMENT
463
THE JUDICIARY CONTINUED
471
THE JUDICIARY CONTINUED AND
480
THE JUDICIARY CONTINUED
490
CERTAIN GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS
509
ernment too remoteNo provision for debts
520
The Declaration of Independence
528
The Constitution of the United States
542
Notes on The Federalist Papers
569
Selected Bibliography
633
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (2003)

James Madison is frequently referred to as "the father of the Constitution" because of the important role that he played in the drafting of the US Constitution during the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia during the summer of 1787. He also played a key role in drafting the Bill of Rights in the First Federal Congress in 1789. He later served as secretary of state under Thomas Jefferson, and succeeded Jefferson as president, serving two terms in that office and overseeing the United States victory over Great Britain in the War of 1812. He was the last Founding Father to die, in 1836, in Montpelier, Virginia.

Alexander Hamilton was born in the British West Indian island of Nevis sometime between 1755 and 1757. During the American War of Independence, he was captain of a New York artillery company and soon thereafter was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, serving as George Washington's secretary and aide-de-camp. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787 from New York, Following that Convention, he organized the writing of The Federalist essays, enlisting John Jay and James Madison in the effort. From 1789 to 1795 he served as America's first secretary of the Treasury. A growing animosity between Hamilton and his longtime New York political rival Aaron Burr culminated in a duel between the two men in 1804. Hamilton was fatally shot and died the day after their encounter

John Jay was a consistent voice for reconciliation with Great Britain in the Continental Congress. While he did not sign the Declaration of Independence, he later worked to secure support for independence in his home state of New York. He was an influential member of the peace delegation that negotiated the treaty of peace with Great Britain ending the Revolutionary War. Recruited by Alexander Hamilton to write essays for The Federalist , his effort was hampered by illness. He later served as the first chief justice of the Supreme Court. He retired from the Supreme Court in 1795 and served as governor of New York for six years before retiring to a farm for the last twenty-seven years of his life.

Richard Beeman, the John Welsh Centennial Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, has previously served as the Chair of the Department of History, Associate Dean in Penn's School of Arts and Sciences, and Dean of the College of Arts of Sciences. He serves as a trustee of the National Constitution Center and on the center's executive committee. Author of seven previous books, among them The Penguin Guide to the United States Constitution  and Plain Honest Men: The Making of the American Constitution , Professor Beeman has received numerous grants and awards including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, and the Huntington Library. His biography of Patrick Henry was a finalist for the National Book Award. 

Bibliografische Informationen