Voyages and Travels to India, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Abyssinia, and Egypt: In the Years 1802, 1803, 1804, 1805, and 1806, Band 3

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Seite 346 - And it came to pass, when Pharaoh had let the people go, that God led them not through the way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near; for God said, Lest peradventure the people repent when they see war, and they return to Egypt...
Seite 36 - It is scarcely possible, says the writer, to describe the scene that was going on in the mean time in the hall, where the people were squabbling and almost fighting with their drawn knives for the raw meat that was handed about, and the teff bread that lay heaped up around the table ; there were however some masters of the ceremony who carried long white sticks with which they frequently chastised those who were too hasty in seizing their portion. Bruce's assertion that the brinde is cut off from...
Seite 82 - ... about eighty feet high and formed out of a single block of granite, curiously carved and in excellent proportion. My attention was for a long time riveted on this beautiful and extraordinary monument. [...] It is difficult to conceive the method by which such a solid mass of granite was raised ... after passing through a country now reduced to so rude a state as Abyssinia.
Seite 256 - ... would meliorate the national character, and assist in bringing back their belief and worship to a purity which they have long lost. The restoration of tranquillity to the provinces, and a legal trade to the empire, would also have the very important effect of putting an end to the exportation of slaves ; which here is not only liable to the same objections as on the western coast of Africa, but to the still greater one that the individuals thus sold and expatriated are Christians, and are moreover...
Seite 129 - The company are so ranged that one man sits between two women ; the man with his long knife cuts a thin piece, which would be thought a good beef-steak in England, while you see the motion of the fibres yet perfectly distinct, and alive in the flesh. No man in Abyssinia, of any fashion whatever, feeds himself, or touches his own meat.
Seite 247 - From these facts, it will appear, that, although partial heresies and gradual corruptions may have crept into the Abyssinian Church — which was the natural consequence of their peculiar and isolated situation, — yet they can justly claim the honour, not...
Seite 181 - Rtood one thousand five hundred years, the circumstance of its being found in so very perfect a state is somewhat remarkable ; and it strongly proves the want of research among the fathers who visited this country in the fifteenth century, as the following account given of it by Tellez "Will sufficiently prove. " Non procul abhinc erectum est saxum, tribus cnbitis latum, insculptum literis partim Greets partim Latinis, sed tetnporis injuria lere exesis.
Seite 420 - ... on each side, and apparently another in the front over the arch of the doorway. This may have been caused by the earthquakes which have occasionally visited the Delta; and which, at one visitation, threw down an obelisk at Heliopolis according to the testimony of Abd-allatif. The top of the monolith is not flat, but elevated to a point in the centre, as Lord Valentia and his fellow-travellers found when viewing it at a distance.
Seite 358 - Macardle resides, is very large, with lofty rooms, and well furnished; a part of the end of the state apartment is raised from the floor, and covered with rich carpet, around which are couches composed of cushions, in the Eastern style, which is called a Divan. The whole room is covered either with a mat or a carpet, and in the middle are chairs and tables : the windows are large and glazed. The female Greeks born in Egypt are pretty, fair, and well made, when young, but child-birth destroys their...
Seite 344 - Gulf must have formerly extended much farther north than it does now, or a considerable latitude must be allowed to the expression of Strabo. The French engineers discovered, when in possession of Suez, that at a little distance to the north of that place are marshes which extend for above twenty-five miles, and are actually lower than the sea, though they are not overflowed, in consequence of a large bar of sand which has accumulated between them j nothing therefore can be more probable, than that,...

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