The Life of George Stephenson and of His Son Robert Stephenson: Comprising Also a History of the Invention and Introduction of the Railway Locomotive

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Harper, 1868 - 501 Seiten
 

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Seite 53 - Soon shall thy arm, unconquered steam, afar Drag the slow barge or drive the rapid car ; Or, on wide-waving wings expanded, bear The flying chariot through the fields of air...
Seite 495 - LIVINGSTONE'S SOUTH AFRICA. Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa ; including a Sketch of Sixteen Years' Residence in the Interior of Africa, and a Journey from the Cape of Good Hope to Loando on the West Coast ; thence across the Continent, down the River Zambesi, to, the Eastern Ocean.
Seite 496 - CHAILLU'S AFRICA. Explorations and Adventures in Equatorial Africa, with Accounts of the Manners and Customs of the People, and of the Chase of the Gorilla, the Crocodile, Leopard, Elephant, Hippopotamus, and other Animals.
Seite 264 - Suppose, now, one of these engines to be going along a railroad at the rate of nine or ten miles an hour, and that a cow were to stray upon the line and get in the way of the engine ; would not that, think you, be a very awkward circumstance ? "
Seite 257 - What can be more palpably absurd and ridiculous than the prospect held out of locomotives traveling twice as fast as stage-coaches ! We would as soon expect the people of Woolwich to suffer themselves to be fired off upon one of Congreve's ricochet rockets', as trust themselves to the mercy of such a machine going at such a rate.
Seite 267 - Locomotive engines are liable to be operated upon by the weather. You are told they are affected by rain, and an attempt has been made to cover them ; but the wind will affect them ; and any gale of wind which would affect the traffic on the Mersey would render it impossible to set off a locomotive engine, either by poking of the fire, or keeping up the pressure of the steam till the boiler was ready to burst.
Seite ii - England has erected no churches, no hospitals, no palaces, no schools ; England has built no bridges, made no high roads, cut no navigations, dug out no reservoirs. Every other conqueror of every other description has left some monument, either of state or beneficence, behind him. Were we to be driven out of India this day, nothing would remain to tell that it had been possessed, during the inglorious period of our dominion, by any thing better than the ourang-outang or the tiger.
Seite 266 - Who but Mr. Stephenson would have thought of entering into Chat Moss, carrying it out almost like wet dung ? It is ignorance almost inconceivable. It is perfect madness, in a person called upon to speak on a scientific subject, to propose such a plan. . . . Every part of the scheme shows that this man has applied himself to a subject of which he has no knowledge, and to which he has no science to apply.
Seite 459 - Stephenson, completely silenced him. Next morning before breakfast, when he was walking in the grounds deeply pondering, Sir William Follett came up and asked what he was thinking about? 'Why, Sir William, I am thinking over that argument I had with Buckland last night. I know I am right, and that if I had only the command of words which he has, I'd have beaten him.' ' Let me know all about it,' said Sir William, ' and I'll see what I can do for you.
Seite 498 - CARTHAGE. Carthage and her Remains: being an Account of the Excavations and Researches on the Site of the Phoenician Metropolis in Africa and other adjacent Places. Conducted under the Auspices of Her Majesty's Government.

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