The Works of Professor Wilson of the University of Edinburgh: Noctes ambrosianae

Cover
W. Blackwood, 1855
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 102 - For the things that are seen are Temporal; but the things that are not seen are Eternal.
Seite 279 - SHUT, shut the door, good John ! fatigued, I said, Tie up the knocker, say I'm sick, I'm dead. The Dog-star rages ! nay 'tis past a doubt, All Bedlam, or Parnassus, is let out : Fire in each eye, and papers in each hand, 5 They rave, recite, and madden round the land.
Seite 279 - They rave, recite, and madden round the land. What walls can guard me, or what shades can hide? They pierce my thickets, through my grot they glide, | • By land, by water, they renew the charge, They stop the chariot, and they board the barge. No place is sacred, not the church is free, Even Sunday shines no Sabbath-day to me : Then from the Mint walks forth the man of rhyme, Happy! to catch me, just at dinner-time.
Seite 265 - ... if the intelligent faculty should be rendered more comprehensive, it would require only a different and apportioned organization, the body celestial instead of the body terrestrial, to bring before every human soul the collective experience of its whole past existence, and this, — this, perchance, is the dread book of judgment, in whose mysterious hieroglyphics every idle word is recorded...
Seite 212 - The Planter's Guide; or, a Practical Essay on the best Method of giving immediate Effect to Wood, by the Removal of large Trees...
Seite 319 - Come, bright improvement! on the car of time, And rule the spacious world from clime to clime ; Thy handmaid arts shall every wild explore, Trace every wave, and culture every shore.
Seite 41 - Leander Van Ess, " quoth the Seventeenth Keport, " seeks no earthly emoluments ; nor is the applause of a vain world his aim ; he desires not the treasures which rust and moth consume. No ; the glory of God, and the salvation of souls, these are the pure and heavenly principles which influence his mind and stimulate his actions.
Seite 76 - ... which have in themselves something sacred and endearing to every good heart. One cannot, surely, always pass by, in his walks for health, restoration, or delight, the lone way-side beggar, without occasionally giving him an alms. Old, care-worn, pale, drooping, and emaciated creatures, who pass us by without looking beseechingly at us, or even lifting...
Seite 279 - I'm sick, I'm dead. The dog-star rages ! nay 'tis past a doubt, All Bedlam, or Parnassus, is let out : Fire in each eye, and papers in each hand, They rave, recite, and madden round the land. What walls can guard me, or what shades can hide? They pierce my thickets, thro...
Seite 279 - tis past a doubt, All Bedlam, or Parnassus, is let out: Fire in each eye, and papers in each hand, They rave, recite, and madden round the land. What walls can guard me, or what shades can hide? They pierce my thickets, through my grot they glide, By land, by water, they renew the charge, They stop the chariot, and they board the barge. No place is sacred, not the church is free, Ev'n Sunday shines no Sabbath-day to me: Then from the Mint walks forth the man of rhyme, Happy!

Bibliografische Informationen