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9. The imagination and affections have a close union toge ther. The vivacity of the former, gives force to the latter. Hence the prospect of any pleasure, withi which we are acquainted, affects us more than any other pleasure, which we may own superior, but of whose nature we are wholly ignorant. Of the one we can form a particular and determinate idea: The other, we conceive under the general notion of pleasure.

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Any satisfaction, which we lately enjoyed, and of which the memory is fresh and recent, operates on the will with more violence, than another of which the traces are decayed and almost obliterated.

A pleasure, which is suitable to the way of life, in which we are engaged, excites more our desires and appetites than another, which is foreign to it.

Nothing is more capable of infusing any passion into the mind, than eloquence, by which objects are represented in the strongest and most lively colours. The bare opinion of another, especially when inforced with passion, will cause an idea to have an influence upon us, though that idea might otherwise have been entirely neglected.

It is remarkable, that lively passions commonly attend a lively imagination. In this respect, as well as others, the force of the passion depends as much on the temper of the person, as on the nature and situation of the object.

What What is distant, either in place or time, has not equal influ. ence with what is near and contiguous.

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I'pretend not here to have exhausted this subject. It is fufficient for my purpose, if I have made it appear, that in the production and conduct of the passions, there is a certain regular mechanism, which is susceptible of as accurate a difquisition, as the laws of motion, optics, hydrostatics, or any part of natural philosophy.

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