Historical Record ...: The Early History of Wyoming Valley and Contiguous Territory ..., Band 7

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Press of the Wilkesbarre Record, 1897
 

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Seite 61 - IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread sovereign lord King James, by the grace of God of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, king, defender of the faith, etc.
Seite 11 - And Lamech said unto his wives, Adah and Zillah, hear my voice; ye wives of Lamech, hearken unto my speech: for I have slain a man to my wounding, and a young man to my hurt.
Seite 147 - Let music swell the breeze, And ring from all the trees Sweet freedom's song! Let mortal tongues awake; Let all that breathe partake; Let rocks their silence break, The sound prolong! 4 Our fathers...
Seite 138 - Must I be carried to the skies On flowery beds of ease, While others fought to win the prize, And sailed through bloody seas...
Seite 142 - East where spices growe, by a way that was never knowen before, by this fame and report there increased in my heart a great flame of desire to attempt some notable thing.
Seite 61 - God, and one of another, covenant and combine our selves togeather into a civill body politick, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by vertue hearof to enacte, constitute, and frame such just and equall lawes, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete and convenient for the generall good of the Colonie, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
Seite 142 - VII. who then reigned, insomuch that all men with great admiration affirmed it to be a thing more divine than human, to sail by the west into the east where spices grow, by a way that was never known before...
Seite 147 - tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing; Land where my fathers died. Land of the pilgrims' pride; From every mountain side.
Seite 45 - Yet so becomingly th' expression past, That each succeeding look was lovelier than the last. Nor guess I, was that Pennsylvanian home, With all its picturesque and balmy grace, And fields that were a luxury to roam, Lost on the soul that look'd from such a face ! Enthusiast of the woods ! when years apace Had bound thy lovely waist with woman's zone, The sunrise path, at morn, I see thee trace To hills with high magnolia overgrown, And joy to breathe the groves, romantic and alone.
Seite 109 - the first voice publicly raised in America to dissolve all connection with Great Britain came not from the Puritans of New England, nor the Dutch of New York, nor from the planters of Virginia, but from the Scotch-Irish Presbyterians.

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