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330, ii.

Henry Lee, Craik, 362, 363; the of-
ficers of the army, 363 ; Trumbull,
Robert and Gouverneur Morris, 363 ;
regard for and courtesy toward
Franklin, 364 ; love for Lafayette,
365 ; care for his family, 366 ; last-
ing regard for Fairfaxes, 366, 367 ;
kindness to Taft family, 367, 368 ;
destroys correspondence with his
wife, 368; their devoted relation-
ship, 368 ; care for his step-children
and relatives, 369, 370; charged
with lack of humor, 371 ; but never
made himself ridiculous, 372; not
joyous in temperament, 372; but
had keen pleasure in sport, 373 ;
enjoyed a joke, even during Revo-
lution, 374; appreciates wit, 375;
writes a humorous letter, 376-378;
not devoid of worldly wisdom, 378,
379; enjoys cards, dancing, the the-
atre, 380; loves horses, 380; thor-
ough in small affairs as well as
great, 381 ; controversy over site
of church, 381 ; his careful domes-
tic economy, 382 ; love of method,
383; of excellence in dress and fur-
niture, 383, 384; gives dignity to
American cause, 385; his personal
appearance, 385; statements of
Houdon, 386 ; of Ackerson, 386,
387; his tremendous muscular
strength, 388 ; great personal im-
pressiveness, 389, 390 ; lacking in
imagination, 391 ; strong passions,
391 ; fierce temper, 392 ; anecdotes
of outbreaks, 392; his absence of
self-love, 393 ; confident in judg-
ment of posterity, 393; religious
faith, 394; summary and conclusion,
394, 395.

Characteristics of. General view,
ii. 304–395 ; general admiration for,
i. 1-7; myths about, i. 9-12, ii.
307 ff.; comparisons with Jeffer-
son, ii. 69; with Lincoln, ii. 310-
312; with Hampden, ii. 312, 313 ;
abseuce of self-seeking, i. 341 ; af-
fectionateness, i. 111, 285, 331, 345, ii.
332, 362-371 ; agreeableness, ii. 344-
347, 377; Americanism, ii. 307-328 ;
aristocratic habits, ii. 314, 316 ;
business ability, i. 105, 109, ii. 5,

352, 382 ; coldness on occasion, l.
223, 224, 263, ii. 318; courage, i.
77, 78, 86, 127, 168, 292; dignity, i.
81, 161, ii. 52–57, 76; hospitality, ii.
360 ; impressiveness, i. 56, 83, 130,
138, 319, ii. 385 ; indomitableness,
i. 177, 181, 227 ; judgments of men,
i. 295, ii. 64, 86, 334, 335 ; justice
and sternness, i.

03,
352-358, 389; kindliness, ii. 349-356,
359; lack of education, i. 62, ii.
337 ; love of reading, i. 62, ii. 341,
342 ; love of sport, i. 56, 98, 113-
116, 118, ii. 380; manners, ii. 282-
283, 314 ; military ability, i. 154,
166, 174, 183, 197, 204, 207, 239, 247,
265, 267, 305-320, ii. 331 ; modesty,
i. 102, 134 ; not a figure-head, ii. 329,
330 ; not a prig, i. 10–12, 41-47 ; not
cold and inhuman, ii. 332, 342; not
dull or commonplace, ii. 330, 332 ;
not superhuman and distant, i. 9,
10, 12, ii. 304, 305 ; open-minded.
ness, ii. 317; passionateness, i. 58,
73, 90 ; personal appearance, i. 57,
136, 137, ii, 282, 343, 385-389; reli-
gious views, i. 321, ii. 393; ro-
mantic traits, i. 96-97 ; sense of
humor, ii. 371-377 ; silence regard-
ing self, i. 14, 69, 70, 116, 129, 285;
ii. 37, 336; simplicity, i. 59, 69, 348,
ii. 50, 340 ; sobriety, i. 49, 52, 134 ;
ii. 43, 45, 333, 373; tact, i. 162, 243,
244–246 ; temper, i. 73, 92, 110, 168,
236, 237, 260, ii. 98, 392; thorough-
ness, i. 142, 323, 341, ii. 381.

Political Opinions. On Alien and
Sedition Acts, ii. 196 ; American
nationality, i. 191, 250, 251, 255,
262, 279, ii. 7, 61, 133, 145, 324,
325, 327, 328; Articles of Confed-
eration, i. 297, ii. 17, 24; bank, ii.
110, 111; colonial rights, i. 120,
124-126, 130; Constitution, i. 38–
41 ; democracy, ii. 317-319; Demo.
cratic party, ii. 214, 239, 240, 258,
261, 267, 268; disunion, ii. 22; du-
ties of the executive, ii. 190; edu-
cation, ii. 81, 326, 339; Federalist
party, ii. 71, 246, 247, 259, 260, 261,
269-274, 298; finance, ii. 107, 108,
112, 122 ; foreign relations, ii. 25,
134, 142, 145, 147, 179, 217-219, 323;

ар.

French Revolution, il. 139, 140, 295, Brandywine, I. 198; his opinion of
318 ; independence of colonies, i. Germantown, 199; at Monmouth
131, 159, 160 ; Indian policy, ii. 82, urges Washington to come, 235;
87, 88, 91, 92, 104, 105 ; Jay treaty, ready to attack Stony Point, 268 ;
ii. 184-205; judiciary, i. 150; nomi his successful exploit, 269 ; joins
nations to office, ii. 62; party, ii. Lafayette in Virginia, 307 ;
70, 222, 233, 249; protection, ii. pointed to command against Iual-
116-122 ; slavery, i. 106-108 ; Stamp ans, ii. 100; his character, 100;
Act, i. 119; strong government, i. organizes his force, 101 ; his march,
298, ii. 18, 24, 129, 130; treaty 102 ; defeats the Indians, 103.
power, ii. 190, 207-210; Virginia and Weems, Mason L., influence of his
Kentucky Resolutions, ii. 266, 267 ; life of Washington on popular opin-
Western expansion, ii. 6, 8-16, 135, ion, i. 10; originates idea of his
163-165, 218, 322.

priggishness, 11 ; his character, 41,
Washington, George Steptoe, his sons 43 ; character of his book, 42 ; his

educated by Washington, ii. 370. mythical “rectorate" of Mt. Ver-
Washington, John, brother of George, non, 43, 44; invents anecdotes of

letter of Washington, to, i. 132. Washington's childhood, 44; folly
Washington, Lawrence, brother of of cherry-tree and other stories,

George Washington, educated in 46; their evil influence, 47.
England, i. 54; has military career, West, the, its importance realized by
64; returns to Virginia and builds Washington, ii. 7-16 ; his influence
Mt. Vernon, 54 ; marries into Fair counteracted by inertia of Con-
fax family, 54, 55; goes to West gress, 8; forwards inland naviga
Indies for his health, 62; dies, leav tion, 9; desires to bind East to
ing George guardian of his daugh West, 9-11, 14; formation of com-
ter, 64; chief manager of Ohio panies, 11-13; on Mississippi navi-
Company, 65; gives George mili gation, 14-16, 164; projects of Genet
tary education, 65.

in, 162 ; its attitude understood by
Washington, Lund, letter of Washing Washington, 163, 164 ; Washington

ton to, i. 152; rebuked by Washing wishes peace in order to develop

ton for entertaining British, ii. 303. it, 218, 219, 321.
Washington, Martha, widow of Daniel " Whiskey Rebellion," passage of ex-

P. Custis, meets Washington, i. 101 ; cise law, ii. 123; outbreaks of vio-
courtship of, and marriage, 101, lence in Pennsylvania and North
102 ; hunts with her husband, 114 ; Carolina, 124 ; proclamation issued
joins him at Boston, 181 ; holds warning rioters to desist, 125 ; re-
levees as wife of President, ii. 54 ; newed outbreaks in Pennsylvania,
during his last illness, 300; her 125, 126; the militia called out,
correspondence destroyed, 368; her 127 ; suppression of the insurrection,
relations with her husband, 368, 128; real danger of movement, 129;
369.

its suppression emphasizes national
Washington, Mary, married to Augus authority, 129, 130; supposed by

tine Washington, i. 39; mother of Washington to have been stirred up
George Washington, 39 ; limited by Democratic clubs, 242.
education but strong character, 40, White Plains, battle at, i. 173.
41; wishes George to earn a living, Wilkinson, James, brings Gates's mos-
49; opposes his going to sea, 49; sage to Washington at Trenton, i.
letters to, 88; visited by her son, 180; brings news of Saratoga to
ii. 5.

Congress, 220 ; nettled at Sher-
Waters, Henry E., establishes Wash man's sarcasm, discloses Conway
ington pedigree, i. 32.

cabal, 220; quarrels with Gates,
Wayne, Anthony, defeated after 223 ; resigns from board of war,

223, 226 ; leads expedition against Wilson, James, “ of England,” hunts
Indians, ii. 95.

with Washington, i. 115.
Willett, Colonel, commissioner to Wolcott, Oliver, receives Fauchet
Creeks, his success, ii. 91.

letter, ii. 195 ; succeeds Hamilton
William and Mary College, Washing as Secretary of Treasury, 246.
ton Chancellor of, ii. 339.

Wooster, Mrs., letter of Washington
Williams, Washington's teacher, i. 48,

to, ii. 61.
51.
Willis, Lewis, story of Washington's Yorktown, siege of, i. 315-318.
school days, i. 95.

“Young Man's Companion," used by
Wilson, James, appointed to Supreme George Washington, origin of his
Court, ii. 72.

rules of conduct, i. 52.

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