The Kings' Lyrics: Lyrical Poems of the Reigns of King James I and King Charles I

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R. H. Russell, 1899 - 127 Seiten
 

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Seite 68 - Why so pale and wan, fond lover? Prithee, why so pale? Will, when looking well can't move her, Looking ill prevail? Prithee, why so pale? Why so dull and mute, young sinner? Prithee, why so mute? Will, when speaking well can't win her, Saying nothing do't?
Seite 62 - Her finger was so small, the ring Would not stay on which they did bring, It was too wide a peck; And to say truth, for out it must, It looked like the great collar just About our young colt's neck. Her feet beneath her petticoat Like little mice stole in and out, As if they feared the light: But, oh ! she dances such a way— No sun upon an Easter day Is half so fine a sight.
Seite 102 - THE glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things: There is no armour against Fate : Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Seite 53 - ASK me no more whither do stray The golden atoms of the day, For in pure love heaven did prepare Those powders to enrich your hair. Ask me no more whither doth haste The nightingale when May is past, For in your sweet dividing throat She winters and keeps warm her note. Ask me no more where Jove bestows, When June is past, the fading rose, For in your beauty's orient deep These flowers as in their causes, sleep.
Seite 110 - Though they to one be ten, Be not amazed. Yet have we well begun, Battles so bravely won, Have ever to the sun By fame been raised. And for myself...
Seite 102 - Now the bright morning star, Day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the East, and leads with her The flowery May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip and the pale primrose.
Seite 36 - Enthralls the crimson stomacher, A cuff neglectful, and thereby Ribbands to flow confusedly, A winning wave (deserving note) In the tempestuous petticoat, A careless shoe-string, in whose tie I see a wild civility, Do more bewitch me, than when art Is too precise in every part.
Seite 105 - While the jolly hours lead on propitious May. Thy liquid notes that close the eye of day, First heard before the shallow cuckoo's bill, Portend success in love.
Seite 69 - Out upon it, I have loved Three whole days together; And am like to love three more, If it prove fair weather. Time shall moult away his wings Ere he shall discover In the whole wide world again Such a constant lover. But the spite on't is, no praise Is due at all to me: Love with me had made no stays, Had it any been but she. Had it any been but she, And that very face, There had been at least ere this A dozen dozen in her place.
Seite 39 - To MEADOWS. Ye have been fresh and green, Ye have been fill'd with flowers ; And ye the walks have been Where maids have spent their hours.

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