Plant Signal Transduction

Cover
Dierk Scheel, Claus Wasternack
OUP Oxford, 28.03.2002 - 324 Seiten
The growth and differentiation of living organisms are continuously adjusted to a multitude of environmental factors, each of which underlies a perpetual variation. The sessile existence of plants further emphasizes the requirement for efficient adaptation and defence mechanisms. The changes in environmental factors may range from moderate to dramatic and can concern many components at the same time. They may be abiotic or biotic in nature and range from essential to toxic in their effects. Among the numerous abiotic factors are nutrients, light, oxygen, water, temperature, gravity, wind, touch and chemicals. Biotic factors are represented by other organisms involved in symbiotic, pathogenic or herbivorous interactions with plants. All of these environmental factors are independently and specifically recognized by plants. Perception and overall response are linked by signal transduction pathways at cellular, systemic and interorganismic levels. In order to guarantee proper adaptation to the environment, signals generated following perception of a multitude of environmental factors need to be integrated and evaluated according to their importance. Cross-talk between different signaling pathways within such networks appears to be the basis for the evaluation of the importance of incoming signals. Knowledge of these complex processes allows a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation. Modulation of distinct signaling elements can generate plants with improved stress resistance. This book represents a comprehensive summary of the enormous amount of information that is now available on signal transduction processes involved in the communication of plants with abiotic and biotic elements of their environment.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

crosstalk with
1
Wound and mechanical signalling
20
The role of active oxygen species in plant signal
45
AOS as signal molecules
52
part of a signalling network
60
Heatstressinduced signalling
74
Complex cellular programmes influenced by heat stress
92
Conclusions
98
Recognition and defence signalling in plantbacterial
198
What actually stops pathogen growth?
205
Application of defence signal transduction findings
216
Signalling in plantvirus interactions
226
Alterations in host gene expression during virus infection
234
Future approaches to hostvirus interactions and conclusions
241
LCO signalling in the interaction between rhizobia
250
Nodfactor signalling
258

Molecular mechanisms of signal transduction in cold
116
Concluding remarks and future perspectives
131
Dehydrationstress signal transduction
140
Identification of transcription factors important for dehydration
149
Signalling components involved in water stress
155
Saltstress signal transduction in plants
165
Regulation of salttolerance responses
171
References
264
Rhizospheric signals and early molecular events
272
Detection and analysis of gene expression during mycorrhiza
278
Acknowledgements
284
Induction of direct defence
290
Index
317
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (2002)

Dierk Scheel is at Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Halle, Germany. Claus Wasternack is at Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Halle, Germany.

Bibliografische Informationen