Handbook of Moral Philosophy

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Macmillan & Company, 1872 - 277 Seiten
 

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Seite 118 - But whatsoever is the object of any man's appetite or desire that is it which he for his part calleth good; and the object of his hate and aversion, evil; and of his contempt, vile and inconsiderable.
Seite 1 - Wilson. — A MEMOIR OF GEORGE WILSON, MD, FRSE, Regius Professor of Technology in the University of Edinburgh. By his SISTER. New Edition. Crown 8vo. 6s. "An exquisite and touching portrait of a rare and beautiful spirit.
Seite 259 - European History, Narrated in a Series of Historical Selections from the best Authorities. Edited and arranged by EM SEWELL and CM YONGE. First Series, crown 8vo. 6s. ; Second Series, 1088-1228, crown 8vo. 6s. Third Edition. " We know of scarcely anything," says the GUARDIAN, of this volume, "which is so likely to raise to a higher level the average standard of English education.
Seite 119 - the doing good to mankind, in " obedience to the will of God, and for the " sake of everlasting happiness...
Seite 18 - Quatorze;" any previous literature being for the most part unknown or ignored. Few know anything of the enormous literary activity that, began in the thirteenth century, was carried on by Rulebeuf...
Seite 113 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
Seite 119 - Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.
Seite 267 - THE ROMAN AND THE TEUTON. A Series of Lectures delivered before the University of Cambridge.
Seite 119 - By the principle of utility is meant that principle which approves or disapproves of every action whatsoever, according to the tendency which it appears to have to augment or diminish the happiness of the party whose interest is in question: or, what is the same thing in other words, to promote or to oppose that happiness.
Seite 119 - For there is no such finis ultimus (utmost aim), nor summum bonum (greatest good), as is spoken of in the books of the old moral philosophers. Nor can a man any more live whose desires are at an end than he whose senses and imaginations are at a stand. Felicity is a continual progress of the desire from one object to another, the attaining of the former being still but the way to the latter.

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