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ACCOUNT of the Number of VESSELS, with the Amount of their TONNAGE, and

repeated Voyages) which entered INWARDS and cleared OUTWARDS, at the January, 1814, and 5th January, 1815; distinguishing the Countries from BRITish from FOREIGN.

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426 1,557 378 486

60 123

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5

2

334

America,—British

United States ....

South America,
Africa..
Azores..
Baltic
Barbary
Cape of Good Hope
Denmark and Norway
Dantzic ......
East Indies
Europe
Florida
Flandery.
France
Germany
Guernsey, Jersey, &c.
Gibraltar
Greenland & Davis' Streights
Honduras
Hambro'
Heligoland
Holland.
Ireland
Italian States...
Isle of Man
Isle of France
Malta ...
New South Wales
Portugal and Madeira
Prussia
Rusia
Spain and Canaries.
Sweden
Southern Fishery.
Turkey
West Indies,-- British

Conquered...
Foreign

15 108

2,283
8,571
2,438
2,420
1,241
5,168

258
678

240
3,683
33,834
1,010
1,935

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47

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592 7,562

105 699

173 29,329 105,224 40,465 31,402 13,661 39,806

5,514 13,161

4,092 56,222 613,898

18,298 26,789 2,183 9,906

438 43,483 33,853 163,043 49,087 27,986 6,744

9,643 171,639 88,844 20,209

109,850
19,656
2,034

140

9

9

1

7

121

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TOTAL

16,065 1,846,670

5,109

566,516

35,591

Custom-House, London,
Office of the Register General of Shipping,

25th February, 1817.

the Number of Men and Boys employed in navigating the same (including their several Ports of Great Britain, from or to all Parts of the World ; between 5th whence the said Vessels arrived, or to which they were bound ; and distinguishing

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106

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35

1

476 6,414

89 1,469 29,425

12

32

81

131 102

7

1,260

11

8

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23,847
6,862
2,785
1,887
1,295
2,852
29,566

1,221
39,141

129

12 225

8 52 1

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5,039 6,961 22,029 57,619 37,482

1,196

555

1,515 510 187 82 67 181 1,629

62 4,342

8 101 2,655 8,356 3,872 2,156 1,664 4,708

262 1,471

290 4,463 39,233

1,346 1,856

369

941
254

34,880
98,550
63,398
31,087
20,256
36,576

1,317 5,913 1,841

406
110

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America, - British

United States

South America
Africa
Azores
Baltic
Barbary
Cape of Good Hope
Denmark and Norway
Dantzic ...
East Indies
Europe
Florida
Flanders..
France
Germany
Guernsey, Jersey, &c. .
Gibraltar
Greenland & Davis' Streights
Honduras
Hambro'
Heligoland
Holland
Ireland
Italian States
Isle of Man
Isle of France
Malta
New South Wales
Portugal and Madeira.
Prussia
Russia
Spain and Canaries
Sweden
Southern Fishery..
Turkey
West Indies,- British

Conquered
Foreign

112
12

4,474

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PUBLICATION of the Supreme Director, explanatory of

the Proceedings of the Government of the United Provinces of South America, during his Administration.-Buenos Ayres, 21st July, 1817,

(Translation.) The evils which had, in succession, since the year 1810, occasioned our calamities, and retarded the progress of our sacred Cause, appeared to have all conspired to assail us at the same moment, threatening to reduce our political existence to its last agonies, towards the close of 1815. The few remaining Forces, which we had saved from the un happy field of Sipesipe, seemed to be on the point of dispersion. The Army which had been organized in the Province of Cuyo, for the purpose of marching upon Chili, found itself insecure even in its entrenchments. The Enemy, proud of his victories, had already formed his plans to take advantage of the Inhabitants of those Districts, who were distracted by opposite Councils, and who dared not indulge a hope that, through our means, they might be shielded from the impending dangers. The Funds in the National Treasury were not only insufficient to satisfy the demands upon it, but even to provide for our most urgent wants. The public spirit of the different Provinces had become blind to the common danger, and occupied itself exclusively in the visionary projects of seeking liberty in the dissolution of every tie. Discord appeared to have taken possession of all hearts, and to have expelled every generous and honorable sentiment. The Citizens of the same Land displayed their valour only in mutual destruction or distrust; assailing their best Friends aud Benefactors. Subordination amongst the Military was not maintained, even by the lowest Subalterns. The Public Authorities were respected only when they gave countenance to crime, to error, and to licentiousness.

It grieves me, Fellow-Citizens, to narrate it, but I must be faithful to the truth, when I undertake to trace the revolting picture which our Country then exhibited to the contemplation of the World; and the acknowledgment of our errors can bring upon us no disgrace, when made with the virtuous resolution of correcting them; nor am I the first Friend of his Country who has publicly deplored our past melancholy situation : pardon me, therefore, if I proceed. Calumny, with her baleful train, had seated herself in the midst of us, scattering her poisons through the minds of our most respectable Fellow-Citizens. The Capital of the State, which, in the midst of the most trying difficulties, bad preserved a certain dignity of character, now appeared to be the focus of all the passions, which distracted every part of our Country. Fractions of every Party were here encountered in a state of the utmost exasperation, whilst the inaminency of the public dangers served only as pretexts for the indulgence of mutual revenge ; each

were

Party accusing the other as the origin of the general distresses, and all entertaining the most injurious suspicions.

The magnanimous People of Buenos Ayres, to whom the praise cannot be denied, of having impoverished themselves in affording aid to their Brethren engaged in the same glorious Cause, were on the point of experiencing a re-action, whose consequences might have proved totally destructive of the character and existence of the Provinces of La Plata. Anarchy, in a word, had lighted up a general conflagration. Nor was this all; for, when it might have been supposed that the measure of our afflictions had been full, the Troops of Portugal made their appearance on the Northern borders of this River, availing themselves of our discords ; for these unhappily had, although unknown to ourselves. but too well favoured the designs of the neighbouring Court. New dangers now presented themselves, new occasions to sow discords, and a new impulse was given to the torrent of personal enmities, which caused even loyalty to be suspected.

It is no easy task, Fellow.Citizens, to give an exact description of our reverses, or to enumerate the perils over which your firmness has happily triumphed. You will all remember that the evils which assailed us, began to diminish at the very moment when we about to yield to despair. The Supreme Congress, into whose bands the People had confided their safety, had just been installed at Tucuman. Those who were called upon to be the Legislators of their Country, and to fix its destiny, by the wisdom of their Councils, were compelled more than once to exert their courage, and to encounter, with intrepidity, the dangers which threatened to profane this last asylum that remained to our Country in its misfortunes. The prudence, the integrity, the fortitude of that august Body, presented to the Provinces the delightful spectacle of an Authority which invited their submission, not less by the just title of its distinguished origin, than by the animated zeal, and the vigorous energy which it displayed, in the first steps of its illustrious career. The boldest Factions were compelled to renounce their extravagant pretensions ; and if in some Districts they had the temerity to attempt new excesses, the celerity with which they were suppressed, scarcely allowed time to their Authors to sue for mercy. The Seditious, notwithstanding, still harboured the design of lulling the vigilance of the Government, in order that they might snatch the opportunity of attacking whatever was most respectable. It was at this crisis, that the Supreme Representation deigned to invest me with the honorable, but awsully responsible powers of Supreme Director of the State. This was not the first time that I had been cloathed with authority; and, that I had experienced the bitter mortification attendant upon it, was too well known for my acceptance of it to be regarded otherwise than as a sacrifice. At that period, being a Member of the Supreine Body, I well knew the mass of evils that would weigh upon me; but even these, in the midst of anxiety and apprehension, only induced my submission to the supreme will.

I had no right to expect that my elevation would meet with the approbation of every one; and the calamities of the tiines caused ine to fear that my Election night give rise to new disturbances. The result did but realise my anticipations. I saw myself compelled to subdue the hearts of my personal Enemies; and I considered that my life was exclusively devoted to the public cause. Invested with the Chief Magistracy, I departed from the Assembly of the Suprerne Congress for the Province of Salta, and had the good fortune to allay the violent dissentions which had set at variance the Citizens and the Military; and, having prepared the elements which afterwards procured for the Sala tanians their well-earned fame, I proceeded to the Army, examined its position, and inspected the fortifications; and, after leaving such orders as circunstances migiit require, I returned to Tucuman, where I had the proud satisfaction of hastening, by my influence, the memorable Act and solemn Declaration of our Independence.

I pursued my Journey to the Capital of Cordova, where, according to previous arrangement, I was expected by General San Martin, in order to settle the Plans for rescuing Chili from the power of the Spaniards. Froin Cordova, with what painful apprehensions did I estend my view towards the agitated Population of Buenos Ayres! I appeal to you, Fellow-Citizens, as the witnesses of the well-founded causes of my fears; and permit me, passing by the perils of my transit, to fix your attention on the first days of my arrival in this Capital. What violence of passions! How many jarring interests! My resoJution was taken. I bastened to fulfil the obligations of my Oath. I announced to the People that the past should be forgotten, and that those who deserved well of their Country, should be rewarded.

Fellow-Citizens, I have not failed in my promises, nor shall I ever have reason to regret my conduct. It is owing to this course, and to your patriotism, that the Constituted Authorities have been supported, in spite of the boldest Innovators; it is to these that I attribute the reconciliation of those who before regarded themselves as having rea. son to be my Enemies; it is to these, in a word, that we are indebted for the obedience to the lawful Authorities, and the love of order, which constitute, at present, the prevailing temper of the Provinces, over whose destinies I have the honour to preside as Chief Magistrate. It were presumptuons folly to assert, that order has been established upon foundations that are proof against every attempt ; the present Age offers but too many examples of the uncertainty, in this respect, of all Political Institutions : but how disgraceful ought we to consider the conduct of those who meditate a repetition of such mournful scenes, in our Country; and let us hope, that, in future, their restless projects will be more easily disconcerted than they were in the earlier

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