The Parliamentary History of England from the Earliest Period to the Year 1803, Band 36

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Seite 901 - Can such things be, And overcome ' us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder...
Seite 995 - What man dare, I dare: Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear, The arm'd rhinoceros, or the Hyrcan tiger; Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves Shall never tremble...
Seite 509 - Majesty, and bring away their effects, as well as their persons, without being restrained in their emigration, under any pretence whatsoever except that of debts or of criminal prosecutions...
Seite 515 - ... or place. XVII. The ambassadors, ministers, and other agents of the contracting powers, shall enjoy respectively in the states of the said powers, the same rank, privileges, prerogatives, and immunities, which public agents of the same class enjoyed previous to the war.
Seite 511 - Exchange of the Ratification of the present Treaty, are invited to return to Malta as soon as that Exchange shall have taken place. They shall there form a general chapter, and shall proceed to the Election of a Grand Master, to be chosen from amongst the Natives of those Nations which preserve Langues, if no such Election shall have been already made since the Exchange of the Ratification of the Preliminary Articles of Peace.
Seite 331 - ... extended circle, few, very few, could be counted to whom he had not found some occasion to be serviceable. To be useful, whether to the public at large, whether to his relations and nearer friends, or even to any individual of his species, was the ruling passion of his life. " He died, it is true, in a state of celibacy ; but if they may be called a man's children whose concerns are as dear to him as his own — to protect whom from evil is the daily object of his care — to promote whose welfare...
Seite 333 - Hampdeu, to be an enthusiastic lover of liberty : nor is it to be wondered at if a descendant of Lord Russell should feel more than common horror for arbitrary power, and a quick, perhaps even a jealous discernment of any approach or tendency in the system of government to that dreaded evil. But whatever may be our differences in regard to principles, I trust there is no member of this House who is not liberal enough to do justice to upright conduct even in a political adversary. Whatever, therefore,...
Seite 1007 - I know not a more solemn or important duty that a member of Parliament can have to discharge, than by giving, at fit seasons, a free opinion upon the character and qualities of public men. Away with the cant of...
Seite 195 - Power may capture the property of its enemies, wherever it shall be met with on the high seas, and may, for that purpose, detain and bring into port neutral vessels laden wholly or in part with any such property. 3. That under the description of contraband of war, which neutrals are prohibited from carrying to the belligerent Powers, the law of nations (if not restrained by special treaty), includes all naval as well as...
Seite 419 - ... officers and men of the several corps of militia, which have been embodied in Great Britain and Ireland during the course of the war; and that the same be communicated to them by the colonels or commanding officers of the several corps, who are desired to (hank them for their meritorious conduct.

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