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more meanly from the advancement of the chest; and it must be an arrears of the others. So is it with unregulated expansion—because, if otherwise, the physical development. The assiduous same rate of increase ought to be suscultivation of some special exercises will tained, seeing that the process which have strengthened and developed the produced the expansion is not only kept parts engaged in its practice; but this up but increased and accelerated in the pre-supposes the neglect of the re- advancing courses of exercise, and also mainder; and the result in both cases is seeing that the rate of muscular developthe same-incompleteness. Therefore, ment is continued. I am quite aware however varied, however extended, how- that this statement is not like one in ever diligently practised, recreative exer- chemical or mechanical science, which cises are not sufficient even to the any one may test for himself; but still healthy and strong. They can no more it is very capable of proof. So entirely develop the perfect man than recreative have I proved its truth, that I would reading can develop the perfect scholar. undertake to receive the last six fresh

I have dwelt thus long upon the men on the list of any College, and, defects of our recreative exercises- irrespectively of their antecedents, their although I bear them an appreciating health or habits, the schools they have affection second to no man's, for I have come from, or the exercises they have noted those of most other countries, and practised, to give them the stated inknow how high ours rank above them crease in the stated time. Now each of all—because it was a perception of these these youths has, during several years, defects which led me to examine the lost the daily and momentary use of these exercises themselves, with a view to as- two inches of chest—not, be it rememcertain the cause of their inadequacy, bered, of external superadded muscular and because through these defects I fibre, valuable as that is; but of absolute hope to draw attention now to a single heart-and-lungs-room, absolute expanfeature in educational exercise as distinct sion of the chamber where these organs from recreative.

perform their all-important functions. We have seen that our recreative In illustration and confirmation of the exercises give a greatly preponderating foregoing, I subjoin a few cases which I share of employment to the lower half have selected from my book of Measureof the body, and that, therefore, in ac- ments, showing the results of systemacordance with the physiological law tized exercise on frames of widely difalready alluded to, the upper half of ferent calibre, and extending over difthe body will be imperfectly developed. ferent periods of practice. (I should Is this borne out by the evidence of the state that every pupil, on the day of his frames of the youths who yearly arrive entrance into the Gymnasium, has cerin this University from our public tain of his measurements registered, schools ?

As the case now which measurements are retaken from stands (and I have arrived at a know- time to time in order to ascertain his ledge of this fact by the careful mea- progress.) The first and second cases surement of many hundred frames from are those of men under the middle size, all the public schools in the country), the third and fourth of men over it; every one who so arrives here does so and the measurements extend over one with the development of this part of the academical year (nine months). The body greatly in arrears. So distinctly fifth case is that of a very delicate youth, is

in arrears that a large portion of it, altogether“ below par” from recent an average of two inches in girth of chest confined occupation; and the measure-is obtainable in the very first term of ments extend over but one month. The his practice in the Gymnasium. Again, sixth case is that of a favourable specithis rate of increase is not sustained men of a youth from one of our great beyond the first term--therefore it must public schools, the measurements exbe chiefly expansion of the cavity of tending over two years.

It is so.

EXAMPLES OF PROGRESS IN DEVELOPMENT.

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I have thought it advisable, in a paper the most part exceptional in their cha

, of this limited extent, to bring forward racter by the general delicacy of the but one line of operation of systematized individuals ; but, as within the last exercise; but I would like, in conclu- year I have had the new public school sion, to state that its influence in other at Radley under my care, I hope by this directions is equally important and de- means sooner or later to arrive at imcided, and specially so in the rectifica- portant facts concerning growth and tion of abnormal spinal developments. development at this most critical period I have also confined my remarks in this of life. I hope, also, soon to be able to single subject to its state as I find it at make observations on an extended scale that early stage of adult life which wit- on the healthy adult of mature frame nesses or follows the period of upward in another rank of life, whose exercise growth. My opportunities for making during the period of growth has been observations on the earlier stages of manual labour, by carrying my system adolescence have hitherto been compara- of exercise under favourable circumtively limited, the cases isolated, and for stances into the ranks of our army.

TOM BROWN AT OXFORD.

BY THE AUTHOR OF “TOM BROWN'S SCHOOL-DAYS."

BEHIND THE SCENES.

a

CHAPTER XXXI.

The carriage was standing before the inn all ready for them, with the hostler

and Mr. Brown's groom at the horses' Mr. and Mrs. Brown had a long way heads. The carriage was a high phaeton to drive home that evening, including having a roomy front seat with a hood some eight miles of very indifferent to it, specially devised by Mr. Brown chalky road over the downs, which sepa- with a view to his wife's comfort, and rate the Vale of Kennet from the Vale that he might with a good conscience of White Horse. Mr. Brown was an enjoy at the same time the pleasures of early man, and careful of his horses, her society and of driving his own horses.

. who responded to his care by being When once in her place Mrs. Brown always well up to much more work than was as comfortable as she would have they were ever put to. The drive to been in the most luxurious barouche Barton Manor and back in a day was a with C springs, but the ascent was cerrare event in their lives. Their master, tainly rather a drawback. The pleasure taking this fact into consideration, was of sitting by her husband and of receivbent on giving them plenty of time for ing his assiduous help in the prelimithe return journey, and had ordered his nary climb, however, more than compengroom to be ready to start by eight sated to Mrs. Brown for this little o'clock; but, that they might not disturb inconvenience. the rest by their early departure, he had Mr. Brown helped her up as usual, sent the carriage to the village inn in- and arranged a plaid carefully over her stead of to the Porters' stables.

knees, the weather being too hot for the At the appointed time therefore, and apron. He then proceeded to walk when the evening's amusements were round the horses, patting them, examinjust beginning at the manor house, Mr. ing the bits, and making inquiries as to Brown sought out his wife; and, after a how they had fed : and, having satisfied few words of leave-taking to their host himself on these points, and feed the and hostess, the two slipped quietly hostler, took the reins, seated himself away, and walked down the village. by his wife, and started at a steady pace

towards the hills at the back of Barton one was sleeping there would keep him village.

awake all night.” For a minute or two neither spoke, Plague take his fancies ! Robert Mr. Brown being engrossed with his has given way to them till he is fit for horses and she with her thoughts. nothing. But you can put him in the Presently, however, he turned to her, chintz room, and give the two girls the and, having ascertained that she was south bedroom and dressing-room.” quite comfortable, went on

“What, put Robert in a room which “Well, my dear, what do you think looks north? My dear John, what can of them?"

you be thinking about?“Oh, I think they are agreeable

Mr. Brown uttered an impatient grunt, people," answered Mrs. Brown; “but

“but and, as a vent to his feelings more deone can scarcely judge from seeing them corous on the whole than abusing his to-day. It is too far for a drive; we brother-in-law, drew his whip more shall not be home till midnight.” smartly than usual across the backs of

“But I am very glad we came. After his horses. The exertion of muscle all they are connexions through poor necessary to reduce those astonished Robert, and he seems anxious that they animals to their accustomed steady trot should start well in the county. Why,

Why, restored his temper, and he returned to he has actually written twice you know the chargeabout our coming to-day. We must try “I suppose we must manage it on to show them some civility.”

the second floor, then, unless you

could “It is impossible to come so far often,' get a bed run up in the schoolroom.” Mrs. Brown persisted.

“No, dear; I really should not like “ It is too far for ordinary visiting. to do that-it would be so very inconWhat do you say to asking them to venient. We are always wanting the come and spend a day or two with us ?” room for workwomen or servants : be

“Certainly, my dear, if you wish it," sides, I keep my account books and answered Mrs. Brown, but without much other things there.” cordiality in her voice.

'« Then I'm afraid it must be on the “Yes, I should like it; and it will second floor. Some of the children please Robert so much. We might have must be moved. The girl seems a nice him and Katie over to meet them, don't girl with no nonsense about her, and

won't mind sleeping up there. Or, why “Let me see,” said Mrs. Brown, with not put Katie upstairs ?” much more alacrity, “Mr. and Mrs. Indeed, I should not think of it. Porter will have the best bedroom and Katie is a dear good girl, and I will not dressing-room ; Robert must have the

put any one over her head.” south room, and Katie the chintz. Yes, “Nor I, dear. On the contrary, I that will do; I can manage it very was asking you to put her over another well."

person's head,” said Mr. Brown, laugh“And their daughter; you have for- ing at his own joke. This unusual regotten her.”

luctance on the part of his wife to assist “Well, you see, dear, there is no more in carrying out any hospitable plans of room.'

his began to strike him; so, not being “Why, there is the dressing-room, an adept at concealing his thoughts, or next to the south room, with a bed in it. gaining his point by any attack except I'm sure nobody can want a better room. à direct one, after driving on for a

You know, John, that Robert can- minute in silence he turned suddenly not sleep if there is the least noise. I on his wife, and said, could never put any one into his dress- Why, Lizzie, you seem not to want ing-room; there is only a single door to ask the girl ?” between the rooms, and, even if they “Well, John, I do not see the need

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No, and you don't want to ask allowance is quite enough without it to her ?

keep him like a gentleman. Besides, you must know, then, I do not." after all, he gets it in meal or in malt; “Don't you like her ? "

I have just paid 251. for his gun." I do not know her well enough “ I know how kind and liberal you either to like or dislike."

are to him ; only I am so afraid of his Then, why not ask her, and see getting into debt.” what she is like? But the truth is, “I wonder what men would do, if Lizzie, you have taken a prejudice they hadn't some soft-hearted woman against her.”

always ready to take their parts and “Well, John, I think she is a thought- pull them out of scrapes," said Mr. less girl, and extravagant; not the sort Brown. “Well, dear, how much do you of girl, in fact, that I should wish to be want to give the boy ?” much here."

“ Twenty-five pounds, just for this “Thoughtless and extravagant!” said year. But out of my own allowance, Mr. Brown, looking grave; “how you John." women can be so sharp on one another! “Nonsense!” replied Mr. Brown; Her dress seemed to me simple and “you want your allowance for yourself pretty, and her manners very lady-like and the children.” and pleasing."

Indeed, dear John, I would sooner " You seem to have quite forgotten not do it at all, then, if I may not do it about Tom's hat,” said Mrs. Brown. out of my own money.” “ Tom's white hat—so I had,” said Well, have it your own way.

I Mr. Brown, and he relapsed into a low believe you would always look well laugh at the remembrance of the scene. dressed, if you never bought another “I call that his extravagance, and not gown. Then, to go back to what we Ther's."

were talking about just now-you will “ It was a new hat, and a very ex- find a room for the girl, somehow ?” pensive one, which he had bought for “Yes, dear, certainly, as I see you are the vacation, and it is quite spoilt.”

bent on it.” “ Well, my dear; really, if Tom will “I think it would be scarcely civil let girls shoot at his hats, he must take not to ask her, especially if Katie comes. the consequences. He must wear it with And I own I think her very pretty, and the holes, or buy another.”

have taken a great fancy to her.” How can he afford another, John? “ Isn't it odd that Tom should never you know how poor he is.”

have said anything about her to us? Mr. Brown drove on now for several He has talked of all the rest, till I knew minutes without speaking. He knew them quite well before I went there." perfectly well what his wife was coming “ No; it seems to me the most nato now, and, after weighing in his mind tural thing in the world." the alternatives of accepting battle or “ Yes, dear, very natural. But I can't making sail and changing the subject help wishing he had talked about her altogether, said,

more ; I should think it less dangerous.” “You know, my dear, he has brought “ Oh, you think Master Tom is in it on himself. A headlong, generous love with her, eh ?” said Mr. Brown, sort of youngster, like Tom, must be laughing. taught early that he can't have his cake “ More unlikely things have hapand eat his cake. If he likes to lend pened. You take it very easily, John.”. his money, he must find out that he “Well, we have all been boys and hasn't it to spend.”

girls, Lizzie. The world hasn't altered “ Yes, dear, I quite agree with you. much, I suppose, since I used to get up But 501. a year is a great deal to make at five on winter mornings, to ride some

twenty miles to cover, on the chance of “Not a bit too much, Lizzie. His meeting a young lady on a grey pony.

him pay.”

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