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the king returning to Rivoli after the teaching since the world began. “Your ceremony.

Majesty,” he said, “will never find the Immediately on his arrival at Rivoli, calm you seek, for men carry with them Victor briefly announced his marriage to the tempest of the soul, and change of his son, who, embarrassed by the unex- place changes not the disposition. The pected news, betrayed more surprise than only way to obtain peace of mind is to pleasure, and could hardly collect him- bear patiently till death our own cross self to stammer out feeble wishes for in the place among men which God has his father's happiness. This, the king appointed us." And, finding that his replied, was secured by the step he had reasonings made but slight impression just taken; and he went on to say that on the king, Boggio, in subsequent conhis wife was not to take the title of versations, entreated him at least to make queen, but in future to be known as a trial of private life, before condemning Marchesa di Spigno, and that, in accord- himself to it without recal, by a tempoance with his wish, she would for the rary withdrawal from affairs. This counsel present continue her duties as lady-in- Victor rejected with characteristic vehewaiting. Another announcement, still mence, saying, “No! I cannot bring more startling, awaited the prince on the myself to do things by halves; all or thirty-first of the same month, when Victor none, indoors or out-of-doors, is my first acquainted him with his purpose motto." Up to the beginning of August to abdicate in his favour-a project which, the king went on amusing himself by although hitherto kept profoundly secret discussing his project of abdication with from the heir to the throne, had been confidential advisers, delighting in the for some time past a fixed idea with the tears and dissuasions with which it was king. In the December of the previous always received; and, as had ever been year, he had commanded from the libra- his wont, while seeking the counsel of rian Palazzi a memoir upon

others, fully determined to follow the reigns who had resigned their crowns; bent of his own mind. and, on receiving the paper, which fully On the 31st of August, prior to the set forth the political, religious, and interview with Charles in which he disfamily reasons urging them to that step, closed his purpose, Victor caused the act Victor went through each case in detail of abdication, which had been drawn up with Palazzi, displaying his wonted a few days before under his careful superacuteness in criticisms upon the views vision, to be read to him by the Marquis and character of the several princes, but di Borgo, of whom he inquired if it were without letting a word fall which might perfectly regular; and, on the marquis betray his own intentions. Towards his observing that a clause freeing the peoconfessor, the Abbé Boggio, the monarch ple from their oath of allegiance must showed less reserve, discussing the ques- be inserted, the king took the act, tion fully with him from time to time; looked it over, and returned it with the and the priest seems to have tried every remark, “Let the deed stand as it is ; argument to move him from his purpose, there is a clause implying their release.” but Victor's reply was always the same. An incident, trivial in itself, but signiHe felt weary, and longed for repose! ficant, if we bear in mind the subtle Charles, then over thirty, was much character of this prince. On the third better able to bear the burden of Govern- of September, an extraordinary assembly, ment; his own great desire was to devote consisting of all the officers of state, the the rest of his days to God, and bury nobility, and foreign ambassadors, was in solitude all his worldly anxieties ! convened by the king at Rivoli. To Upon this the Abbé warned his royal very few the purpose of this gathering penitent that he would infallibly repent had been revealed; and those few, by if he took the step, and clinched his their master's order, kept it secret. The argument with that old truth which ex- utmost excitement prevailed; conjecture suspense with the expectation of some perhaps, had any human heart beaten great event. Victor, his son, and the higher with hope and ambition than the ministers assembled first in the royal Marchesa's on this eventful third of cabinet, where, amidst the tears of all September, when she took her place present, the king affixed his signature among the other ladies assembled in to the act of abdication ; and, proceed- Polyxena's apartment. The fair bevy ing into the great hall of the palace, of dames and damsels must have endured where the nobility and the diplomatic an agony of curiosity; and, though concorps were assembled, he commanded jecture and whisper were silenced by Di Borgo to read the document in a the presence of the princess, whose calm, loud voice, and to betray no weakness. proud face betrayed no sign that she Then, amid the deep hush of expecta- held the secret of the hour, a whole tion and astonishment, the marquis read battery of significant glances was opened before all the formal abdication of Victor upon the Marchesa, who awaited, with Amadeus. The breathless silence which ill-concealed impatience, the announceensued when the voice of the reader had ment which she dared to hope would ceased, was broken by the sobs of the place her higher than her mistress. At old nobles, who now learnt for the first length distant sounds of the breakingtime that the master they had so long up of the assembly were heard-at served was about, by withdrawing him- length footsteps approached the door; self from his people, to forestall the the king entered, followed by his son ; inevitable separation of the grave. proclaimed that he had accomplished After Charles had, with the deepest his abdication, and saluted Polyxena as emotion, kissed his father's hand, the Queen of Sardinia. In the first anguish nobles did homage to the two kings, of a disappointment as cruel as it was when Victor took the opportunity of unlooked for, Theresa turned pale, and saying a last gracious word to each, and seemed ready to faint; but on a lady recounting their several merits and inquiring if the Marchesa felt ill, she services to his son ; to the end he be- summoned enough self-command to trayed not the slightest sign of feeling, reply, to the malicious courtesy, that the but stood enjoying all the excitement pleasure she experienced in offering her and tears of which he was the object. duty to the new queen

those sove

had overpowered For so strangely mingled is the web of her for the moment. human nature, that it offers us here the Victor spent the rest of the day in spectacle of a sovereign, prosperous, arranging his plans, and discussing with wise, and rich in the experiences of a child-like eagerness the new life upon long life, delighting in the pageant of which he was about to enter. He was this scene where he was chief actor, and persuaded with some difficulty to retain not less blind to all its consequences the title of king; but he steadily refused than the simplest novice, who plays her both guards and retinue; declaring that part as the bride of Heaven, fluttered by henceforth he would be simply a counthe interest she excites, and thoughtless try gentleman, living in retirement on of the years which lie, heavy and dark, his estate. He entreated Charles to behind the veil. ,

fulfil faithfully the trust committed into Up to this hour the king had kept his hands, and renewed recommendahis wife in complete ignorance of the tions he had before made of certain great change he contemplated; and ministers, especially begging him to rely Theresa, divining some mystery, and on the Marquis D'Ormea, an able statesbelieving, naturally enough, that it con- man, whom Victor had lately created cerned herself, had solved it according Minister of the Interior. It is curious to her own desires, imagining herself to note that the old king, in the midst of already a queen, and lavishing every pious protestations that he had done art and fascination of which she was with this world, and should spend the mistress to secure her promotion. Never, rest of his days in preparation for a

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better, did not forget to stipulate for a although too proud to complain of the weekly bulletin of all political news, omission. Meantime, as the spring adboth foreign and domestic.

vanced, fresh misunderstandings broke Not until he was on the point of quit- out between the court of Rome and Sarting Rivoli next morning for Chambery, dinia. The dispute waxed warm; and which he had chosen as his retreat, did Charles, acting under the guidance of Victor's spirits give way. Then, in the D'O nea, not only refused any concesmidst of his adieus, he faltered and burst sion, but broke off diplomatic relations into tears. Even at this eleventh hour with Rome, and caused one of his theoCharles entreated him to resume the logians to put forth a defence of his consovereignty; but, recovering himself, he duct, a copy of which he despatched to hastily entered the carriage, accompanied Chambery.

Chambery. In the midst of the exby his wife. The Marchesa claims our king's anger that this step had been repity, for her wrong was as great as her solved upon without his concurrence, he disappointment. Setting her ambition was struck with the promptitude and aside, a woman of less spirit would have energy, so foreign to Charles's character, been stung to the quick on finding her- which it exhibited, and gave the credit self thus duped by her husband-at the where it was really due—to the Marquis. utter selfishness and careless contempt This embroilment with Rome served to with which he had entirely ignored her heighten the discontent which had of in an affair so important to them both. late been growing upon Victor; he was Such considerations served to swell the angry and sore at the meagre news retide of grief and rage which Theresa ceived from Turin, while the despatches, could hardly keep within bounds through when they did arrive, filled as they were that journey, where every league of the with debates in which he had had no road seemed a fresh separation from the share, and affairs concluded without his world of life and pleasure she loved, till counsel, only fed the irritated mood in it was lost in mountain passes, frowning which, from his retreat at Chambery, he as a barrier to her return.

had watched others playing the game of On the sixth of October the corona- power, till he grew fevered with longing tion of the new sovereign was celebrated to take it out of their hands. Nor could with extraordinary pomp; and the sim- it have been otherwise; war, political plicity which had hitherto prevailed intrigue, the pursuit of fame and gave place at once to a magnificence power---these objects, and these alone, more accordant to the tastes of Charles had been for half a century the very Emmanuel. For some time an active breath of life to this man, who went into correspondence was maintained between his retirement with a disposition as Turin and Chambery ; Victor, kept restless and eager as ever, with a mind informed of the minutest affairs, and utterly unfurnished by those tastes consulted on every occasion, however which sweeten solitude. Unlike Charles trivial, found his political appetite grow V., whom he proposed as his model, by what it fed on. The Marquis there was little of the religious element D'Ormea, who soon acquired unbounded in the nature of the Italian, who, in influence over Charles, ill-brooked his believing his heart set on forsaking the old master's constant interference, and world to serve his Maker, had interwatched every token that his ruling preted a mere impulse as a fixed mental passion was still strong with a jealous condition, as he had taken the Martineye. In the February of 1731, he took mas summer of passion in his blood for the occasion of an apoplectic fit with that steady, serene affection which is the which the ex-king was seized, to discon- true sunshine of declining life. A continue the weekly despatches; and, in temporary historian says that Theresa consequence, when Charles paid a visit turned the reaction which had come to his father at the end of March, he upon her husband to her own purpose; suspense with the expectation of some perhaps, had any human heart beaten great event. Victor, his son, and the higher with hope and ambition than the ministers assembled first in the royal Marchesa's on this eventful third of cabinet, where, amidst the tears of all September, when she took her place present, the king affixed his signature among the other ladies assembled in to the act of abdication; and, proceed- Polyxena's apartment. The fair bevy ing into the great hall of the palace, of dames and damsels must have endured where the nobility and the diplomatic an agony of curiosity; and, though CORcorps were assembled, he commanded jecture and whisper were silenced by Di Borgo to read the document in a the presence of the princess, whose calm, loud voice, and to betray no weakness. proud face betrayed no sign that she Then, amid the deep hush of expecta- held the secret of the hour, a whole tion and astonishment, the marquis read battery of significant glances was opened before all the formal abdication of Victor upon the Marchesa, who awaited, with Amadeus. The breathless silence which ilī-concealed impatience, the announceensued when the voice of the reader had ment which she dared to hope would ceased, was broken by the sobs of the place her higher than her mistress. At old nobles, who now learnt for the first length distant sounds of the breakingtime that the master they had so long up of the assembly were heard-at served was about, by withdrawing him- length footsteps approached the door ; self from his people, to forestall the the king entered, followed by his son; inevitable separation of the grave. proclaimed that he had accomplished After Charles had, with the deepest his abdication, and saluted Polyxena as emotion, kissed his father's hand, the Queen of Sardinia. In the first anguish nobles did homage to the two kings, of a disappointment as cruel as it was when Victor took the opportunity of unlooked for, Theresa turned pale, and saying a last gracious word to each, and seemed ready to faint; but on a lady recounting their several merits and inquiring if the Marchesa felt ill, she services to his son; to the end he be- summoned enough self-command to trayed not the slightest sign of feeling, reply, to the malicious courtesy, that the but stood enjoying all the excitement pleasure she experienced in offering her and tears of which he was the object. duty to the new queen had overpowered For so strangely mingled is the web of her for the moment. human nature, that it offers us here the Victor spent the rest of the day in spectacle of a sovereign, prosperous, arranging his plans, and discussing with wise, and rich in the experiences of a child-like eagerness the new life upon long life, delighting in the pageant of which he was about to enter. He was this scene where he was chief actor, and persuaded with some difficulty to retain not less blind to all its consequences the title of king; but he steadily refused than the simplest novice, who plays her both guards and retinue; declaring that part as the bride of Heaven, fluttered by henceforth he would be simply a counthe interest she excites, and thoughtless try gentleman, living in retirement on of the years which lie, heavy and dark, his estate. He entreated Charles to behind the veil.

fulfil faithfully the trust committed into Up to this hour the king had kept his hands, and renewed recommendahis wife in complete ignorance of the tions he had before made of certain great change he contemplated ; and ministers, especially begging him to rely Theresa, divining some mystery, and on the Marquis D'Ormea, an able statesbelieving, naturally enough, that it con- man, whom Victor had lately created cerned herself

, had solved it according Minister of the Interior. It is curious to her own desires, imagining herself to note that the old king, in the midst of already a queen, and lavishing every pious protestations that he had done art and fascination of which she was with this world, and should spend the mistress to secure her promotion. Never, rest of his days in preparation for a

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better, did not forget to stipulate for a although too proud to complain of the weekly bulletin of all political news, omission. Meantime, as the spring adboth foreign and domestic.

vanced, fresh misunderstandings broke Not until he was on the point of quit- out between the court of Rome and Sarting Rivoli next morning for Chambery, dinia. The dispute waxed warm; and which he had chosen as his retreat, did Charles, acting under the guidance of Victor's spirits give way. Then, in the D’Ormea, not only refused any concesmidst of his adieus, he faltered and burst sion, but broke off diplomatic relations into tears. Even at this eleventh hour with Rome, and caused one of his theoCharles entreated him to resume the logians to put forth a defence of his consovereignty; but, recovering himself, he duct, a copy of which he despatched to hastily entered the carriage, accompanied Chambery. In the midst of the exby his wife. The Marchesa claims our king's anger that this step had been repity, for her wrong was as great as her solved upon without his concurrence, he disappointment. Setting her ambition was struck with the promptitude and aside, a woman of less spirit would have energy, so foreign to Charles's character, been stung to the quick on finding her- which it exhibited, and gave the credit self thus duped by her husband-at the where it was really due to the Marquis. utter selfishness and careless contempt This embroilment with Rome served to with which he had entirely ignored her heighten the discontent which had of in an affair so important to them both. late been growing upon Victor; he was Such considerations served to swell the angry and sore at the meagre news retide of grief and rage which Theresa ceived from Turin, while the despatches, could hardly keep within bounds through when they did arrive, filled as they were that journey, where every league of the with debates in which he had had no road seemed a fresh separation from the share, and affairs concluded without his world of life and pleasure she loved, till counsel, only fed the irritated mood in it was lost in mountain passes, frowning which, from his retreat at Chambery, he as a barrier to her return.

had watched others playing the game of On the sixth of October the corona- power, till he grew fevered with longing tion of the new sovereign was celebrated to take it out of their hands. Nor could with extraordinary pomp; and the sim- it have been otherwise ; war, political plicity which had hitherto prevailed intrigue, the pursuit of fame and gave place at once to a magnificence power--these objects, and these alone, more accordant to the tastes of Charles had been for half a century the very Emmanuel. For some time an active breath of life to this man, who went into correspondence was maintained between his retirement with a disposition as Turin and Chambery ; Victor, kept restless and eager as ever, with a mind informed of the minutest affairs, and utterly unfurnished by those tastes consulted on every occasion, however which sweeten solitude. Unlike Charles trivial, found his political appetite grow V., whom he proposed as his model, by what it fed on. The Marquis there was little of the religious element D’Ormea, who soon acquired unbounded in the nature of the Italian, who, in influence over Charles, ill-brooked his believing his heart set on forsaking the old master's constant interference, and world to serve his Maker, had interwatched every token that his ruling preted a mere impulse as a fixed mental passion was still strong with a jealous condition, as he had taken the Martineye. In the February of 1731, he took mas summer of passion in his blood for the occasion of an apoplectic fit with that steady, serene affection which is the which the ex-king was seized, to discon- true sunshine of declining life. A continue the weekly despatches ; and, in temporary historian says that Theresa consequence, when Charles paid a visit turned the reaction which had come to his father at the end of March, he upon her husband to her own purpose ;

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