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the off foreleg, and the strap is passed which have been explained in their applithrough a surcingle-previously buckled cation to young horses, Mr. Rarey has round the horse's body-merely as an subdued and made gentle and playful aid to the hand in holding the strap the most savage brutes England could tight in the after operations. d push furnish. They are brought into his preagainst the shoulder obliges the horse sence as it were handcuffed—led by a to move a step. As he lifts his leg couple of grooms, one on each side, armed the strap is drawn up, the leg doubled with bludgeons, and holding stout ropes under him, and he comes down gently some ten feet in length attached to the on both knees. A moment is absorbed horse's head. In no other way can any in astonishment at this extraordinary ordinary mortal dare to approach these circumstance, and then an effort is made sons of Belial.

Held thus captive, a to remedy the accident. But it can't yell, a scream, a lash with the hindbe remedied ; often as the horse may feet, a fierce pawing with the fore-feet

he cannot get his feet loose, and ato an imaginary enemy show every still comes down again on his knees. moment the demoniac spirit within. After five, ten, or fifteen minutes' strug- Mr. Rarey watches a quiet instantgle (it never exceeds, and very rarely with a light spring he is at the horse's reaches, twenty minutes), he resigns him- shoulder, the grooms drop the long self to circumstances, and gently lies reins, and with their bludgeons vanish down. Perhaps after a rest he will have from the arena.

Man and horse are one more try; but at last he is fully satis- alone to fight it out—the horse, in his fied that man is the stronger, and that furious passion, bending all his powers it is useless to resist. . Now you may

to beat down, trample on, mangle, kill handle him all over, sit upon him, take his adversary ; the man, resolute to reup all his legs, and make him familiar claim, humanise, subdue into gentle with the weight and touch of your body. affection the wild beast by his side. All this time you never once hurt him. Standing close by the shoulder, he His proud spirit is taught that it must avoids the blows alike of hind and forehumble itself, but there is no physical feet. The right arm is over the withers, pain. When he finally yields you caress and the hand holds the off-rein, so as him. And so when he rises, after his to draw the horse's head to that side, first lesson, a wiser and a better horse, and prevent his reaching his antagonist he bears you no grudge. You are a with his teeth. In this position the superior being, who may in an instant horse can but struggle to shake his opblast his right leg, and make him pow- ponent off. But the hold is too secure. erless as a foal ; but you are good as Round the ring goes the life and death well as powerful. He will follow you waltz. At length the quieter moment now more readily than before ; and now arrives, when with his left hand Mr. that he is standing, he will let you sit Rarey slips the leather noose round the upon him as you did when he was on leg, drops it to its place, and draws it the ground. A few more lessons impress tight. Another dash, and at the next his mind indelibly. Never more will halt the left leg is caught up and he resist; experience, the only teacher securely buckled.

securely buckled. Crippled now, the of horse and man, has taught him it is fury of the animal increases, but the vain, and in his submission he finds his struggles are shorter. Soon the other true happiness. That is, if you are good leg is caught up and all is safe.

. In ten to him ; if you are powerful and bad, minutes that horse must be on his side you are—a devil, and as a devil

you

will -exhausted, but unhurt-yielding only make devils like yourself.

to the resistless power of the calm, But even if thus made devils, Mr. inevitable being at his side. When Rarey's creed is, that no horse ever he is quiet he is caressed. The straps passes beyond the reach of softening are removed ; and, when his powers are rejoice to think, is there anything new the horse has no inclination to resist. in the theory that gentleness is the best When he has yielded the head, the teacher, and kindness the sharpest spur. horse for his own comfort makes a side This part of Mr. Rarey's system is every step. The victory is gained. The day practised by thousands of horsemen process is repeated, and the side step. and horsewomen in our own land. But comes quicker, and gradually less to the the novelty in Mr. Rarey's system is the side and more to the front. At last the system as a whole. It lies in his appli- horse understands that when you draw cation of the theory, announced by him- his head you want his body to come self from the first as truly all that he with it-and as soon as he understands claimed of "discovery," that the right he acts. In a very little time he will way to subdue any animal of power follow you without drawing, merely greater than man's is to apply man's because he likes your caresses. Now weaker force in such a way and by such you may halter him when you like, only means that the animal shall be compelled taking care first that he smells the straps to believe it to be the greater, and and the rope, so as to assure himself to accompany that exhibition of superior that there is no harm in them, and that strength with such gentleness that the they are so put on as not to suggest to animal shall recognise that its new his mind the idea that they hurt him. master is a beneficent master, and shall A light bit will in the same way be for the future obey him for love as much quietly accepted next lesson. as of necessity.

If the horse is very gentle, he may, in Now let me—not that I can say much a similar manner, be soon accustomed to that is new of the process, already so feel your hand, your arm, the weight of often described, but because having seen your body on his back, and so be safely it performed on scores of horses by mounted. But there is some risk, if he Mr. Rarey, and in some slight way prac

is not very quiet, that during this protised it myself, I can say what its cess something may cause him to put general principles and effect are, without out his strength against yours, and to reference to the modifications induced make the discovery, almost fatal in a by the individual character of any par- horse of spirit, that his strength is greater ticular animal — try to explain the than yours. So, once for all, Mr. Rarey method by which all this is brought will convince him that the reverse is the about. With a wild prairie-bred colt fact. By gradual advances of the hand the first point would be, of course, to down the leg, he comes to the near fore catch him; and, even in this, Mr. Rarey's foot, and persuades the horse to oblige knowledge of horse nature finds an him by lifting it. A soft strap forminstructive theme. But in our country ing a noose is placed round the pastern; a colt is seldom unused to the approach the other end is buckled round the and touch of man, and therefore we may “arm," i.e. the leg above the knee. proceed to the second stage-that in So the leg is suspended, and the horse which the object is to teach him to finds himself-he does not exactly know submit to be led. The ordinary breaker how, but fancies it must be through does this by putting a halter on and some super-horse power in the creature pulling in front, while his helper uses at his side-obliged to stand on three the whip behind. The horse will fly legs. A step or two under this restraint from the unexpected pain ; but wild convinces him that it is very awkward terror slowly instructs. Mr. Rarey uses and uncomfortable, and that he would no whip, and does not commence with be

very much obliged if his friend would a halter. He cannot drag the horse break the spell. If in alarm he strugforward, for the horse is stronger than gles for a moment, he quickly becomes he is ; but, standing at the side, he can quiet when he finds he is not hurt, only draw the head and neck gently towards unaccountably paralyzed. Then a similar him, for the muscles are weak there, and noose is placed round the pastern of the off foreleg, and the strap is passed which have been explained in their applithrough a surcingle-previously buckled cation to young horses, Mr. Rarey has round the horse's body-merely as an

subdued and made gentle and playful aid to the hand in holding the strap the most savage brutes England could tight in the after operations. d push furnish. They are brought into his preagainst the shoulder obliges the horse sence as it were handcuffed—led by a to move a step. As he lifts his leg couple of grooms, one on each side, armed the strap is drawn up, the leg doubled with bludgeons, and holding stout ropes under him, and he comes down gently some ten feet in length attached to the

on both knees. A moment is absorbed horse's head. In no other way can any * in astonishment at this extraordinary ordinary mortal dare to approach these circumstance, and then an effort is made sons of Belial.

Held thus captive, a to remedy the accident. But it can't yell, a scream, a lash with the hindbe remedied ; often as the horse may feet, a fierce pawing with the fore-feet rear up he cannot get his feet loose, and ato an imaginary enemy show every still comes down again on his knees. moment the demoniac spirit within. After five, ten, or fifteen minutes' strug- Mr. Rarey watches a quiet instantgle (it never exceeds, and very rarely with a light spring he is at the horse's reaches, twenty minutes), he resigns him- shoulder, the grooms drop the long self to circumstances, and gently lies reins, and with their bludgeons vanish down. Perhaps after a rest he will have from the arena.

Man and horse are one more try; but at last he is fully satis- alone to fight it out—the horse, in his fied that man is the stronger, and that furious passion, bending all his powers it is useless to resist. , Now you may to beat down, trample on, mangle, kill handle him all over, sit upon him, take his adversary; the man, resolute to reup all his legs, and make him familiar claim, humanise, subdue into gentle with the weight and touch of your body. affection the wild beast by his side. All this time you never once hurt him. Standing close by the shoulder, he His proud spirit is taught that it must avoids the blows alike of hind and forehumble itself, but there is no physical feet. The right arm is over the withers, pain. When he finally yields you caress and the hand holds the off-rein, so as him. And so when he rises, after his to draw the horse's head to that side, first lesson, a wiser and a better horse, and prevent his reaching his antagonist he bears you no grudge. You are a with his teeth. In this position the superior being, who may in an instant horse can but struggle to shake his opblast his right leg, and make him pow

But the hold is too secure. erless as a foal; but you are good as Round the ring goes the life and death well as powerful. He will follow you waltz. At length the quieter mo nt now more readily than before ; and now arrives, when with his left hand Mr. that he is standing, he will let you sit Rarey slips the leather noose round the upon him as you did when he was on leg, drops it to its place, and draws it the ground. A few more lessons impress tight. Another dash, and at the next his mind indelibly. Never more will halt the left leg is caught up and he resist; experience, the only teacher securely buckled. Crippled now, the of horse and man, has taught him it is fury of the animal increases, but the vain, and in his submission he finds his struggles are shorter. Soon the other true happiness. That is, if you are good leg is caught up and all is safe. In ten to him ; if you are powerful and bad, minutes that horse must be on his side you are-a devil, and as a devil

you

will -exhausted, but unhurt-yielding only make devils like yourself.

to the resistless power of the calm, But even if thus made devils, Mr. inevitable being at his side. When Rarey's creed is, that no horse ever he is quiet he is caressed. The straps passes beyond the reach of softening are removed ; and, when his powers are

ponent off.

to attack again his fated subduer. A horse tries to disengage and straighten few more lessons daily, or twice a day, his legs—are so weak, that the utmost repeated, enforce on his memory what force they can exert against the straps has been taught, and he may then be is insufficient to produce pain. Bandrestored to society.

age your own ancle tightly to your Such is the process in a public arena. thigh, and you will find that it does But when he operates in private, Mr. not hurt you, however hard you may Rarey prefers to approach the horse, or try to get loose. So, when the second let the horse approach him, alone. Such leg is taken up, and the horse brought is his confidence-and no man has a on his knees, the position, however larger experience on which to base his awkward and helpless, is not unnatural, confidence—in the native goodness of painful, nor injurious. It is, in fact, the horse, that he believes the most that which the horse naturally takes dangerous savage will not attack a

for a moment every time he lies down, man from whom he has received no and it is that which the ox (not the wrong, who stands unarnied, and shows horse, however) takes in rising up. I no fear or hostility. So, when he first have seen quiet horses commence to saw Cruiser, he opened the door and graze when brought to this position in stood alone before the animal—heavily a pasture-field. To continue it for any muzzled, it is true, but loose and free length of time is of course fatiguing, to strike with his feet. With a scream, and this is its advantage. A countrythe horse sprang at his supposed enemy; man, I believe, of Mr. Rarey, has inbut, seeing a stranger, motionless and geniously remarked that the leopard unprepared for combat, he paused mid- can change his spots, for when he is way, and drew near quietly to examine tired of one spot he can go to another. the intruder. Let not Mr. Rarey's, dis- So the horse, when he is tired of the ciples, however, till they have had no first stage towards lying down, and has less than his experience, and can work satisfied his mind that he cannot at prewith his most wonderful nerve, temper, sent get up, can change his position by skill, and activity, so presume. An advancing to the second stage of lying instant's wavering of heart, or the mi- down. This is exactly what the intellinutest failure in judgment, would fire gent animal does, and in so doing he the train. Yet we may remember, as finds not merely physical rest but moral confirmatory of Mr. Rarey's theory, that happiness. it is a known fact that many horses How far the conviction of human violent with men are tractable in a

supremacy thus wrought on the horse's lady's hands; and that we have well- mind is permanent and ineffaceable, is authenticated stories in which most a question which has been debated with savage animals have suffered infants to

an unnecessary degree of warmth. The play among their legs, and have been fact is, that to Mr. Rarey the most seen carefully lifting each foot to avoid vicious horses are ever after gentle ; and hurting the child.

equally-gentle to all who treat them I am anxious to press a little further gently. But of course Nature is not the consideration that in all this pro- changed; and the cruelty or folly that cess, rightly conducted, — and if not first excited resistance and then drove rightly conducted it will not succeed,- it to madness, will still produce again there is absolutely no pain inflicted. the same results.

Is Mr. Rarey's sysThe horse's spirit is forced to yield; tem, then, imperfect, because it is not and, till he recognises the necessity, he creative, but only educational ? Or is struggles violently. But his struggles the education imperfect, because with are so managed that they produce no some natures its teachings may be overphysical suffering whatever. The mus- powered by the sudden recoil of unprocles of the legs, which are restrained by voked suffering? I confess, in such a the straps—those muscles by which the case, I blame neither the education nor the nature to which it is applied ; I tion.

As evil tendencies grow so do blame only the guilty harshness or in- good. A man who is discriminatingly discretion which tempts a hasty nature kind to his horse must have sympathies to revolt, and forbids all hope of am- awakened with every living thing. It nesty on submission. I think I have is good to be obliged even to simulate heard too of little boys, whom a sense goodness. The human mind is fortuof unjust treatment has made doggednately too unelastic to avoid taking perlittle rebels or violent little savages, but manently something of the form which whose after life has shown that in them it externally puts on. Something, too, from the first had dwelt the spirit is gained on the side of goodness by which is breathed into heroes only. simply making thoughtless men think Who was to blame for these wild child- of it. hood days—the child, or the child's ill- Yet with knowledge comes, as ever, judging teachers? Perhaps they were responsibility. Hitherto we have looked mot cruel—perhaps with another child at the great sad problem of the sufferings the very same treatment would have of animals as if such liability were to been eminently successful. Perhaps them an inevitable condition of existence. they had only little cunning ways which We have laid the flattering unction to a less honest child would not have no- our souls that what the horse or dog ticed-perhaps they were guilty only of might suffer at our hands was in great petty exasperations, which a duiler child

part a necessary concomitant of his educawould not have felt. Is all this the tion to our service, and certainly was less child's fault? If, taken from such than he might have had to suffer had he charge, and placed in just and tender been left wild. The former position is hands, the fierce anger and despairing now untenable, and even the second recklessness are softened into submis- grows uncomfortably doubtful. To anision, is it a defect of that true educa- mals in a state of nature disease seldom tion that it never can bend the spirit comes; when it comes it is short-often to bear wrong with callousness, and to shortened by the instinct which makes see fraud with indifference ?

the companions of a sick or wounded tainly seems to me that Mr. Rarey's beast fall upon and kill it. Their main taming of a violent horse is as little suffering, then, in the wild state, is neither impeachable, from the fact that bad more nor less than simply the final agonies treatment will make the horse again as of death. Their death is either placid violent as ever.

from exhaustion, or violent, as by drownBut all rebellions have a beginning, ing, by the attack of carnivorous aniand all mental tendencies grow more mals, or by that of their fellow-species. fixed with indulgence. Mr. Rarey's How much suffering is there in these teaching will have this great practical modes of death? We fancy a great benefit, that it will cut away the occa- deal ; but is it not that with ourselves sion of many a rebellion.

Few men

“the sense of death is most in apprehencould subdue a made savage with Mr. sion"! Of drowning we know, by the Rarey's dexterity--but nearly all men testimony of those who have recovered, can, and I do hope will, come to follow that the sensation after the first momenhis teaching in its application to spirited tary shock of immersion is actually one of horses, whom an opposite course might intense pleasure. Of death by the attack render savage. For this never did any- of wild animals, we have a very singular one better deserve the thanks of the testimony from the experience of Dr. Liv. humane—I will add of the philan- ingstone.

He tells us that he was once thropist. This lesson of the infinite seized by a lion, which sprang upon him, power of kindness, taught with such threw him down, breaking his arm, and new and striking illustration, will go then taking him in his mouth shook him home to thousands of hearts in which as a terrier does a rat, or a cat a mouse.

It cer

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